Republicans want power not jobs...

Republicans want power not jobs...

Republicans in the House yesterday passed legislation giving themselves even more power. The “Regulations from the Executive In Need of Scrutiny Act” – or REINS Act – gives either chamber of Congress complete veto power over new regulations put in place by White House executive orders.

The bill most helps corporate polluters – as Republicans would be able to shoot down new environmental regulations that keep our children and environment safe – and to hell with the balance of power that’s supposed to exist in our government. The ironic thing about this legislation is that President Obama has enacted far fewer regulations than the George W. Bush – but there was no outcry about over-regulation during Bush's presidency.

So while Republicans pass legislation that won’t create a single job – and won’t even pass the Senate – the clock is ticking on middle class Americans who face a $1,000 tax hike at the end of the year unless House Republicans agree to extend the payroll tax cut.

Comments

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 2 years 45 weeks ago
#1

What if we should all tell our capitalist privateers that if they can play that game (like pre-paid fees some fire departments are demanding) then so can we. Unless the privateers pay each of us citizens a fee (maybe in the form of increasing taxes for the wealthy and decreasing taxes for the non-wealthy), we will not be willing to be good, responsible citizens and be willing to be witnesses or to testify on their behalf in the event of some "crime" committed against them.

If a bank is robbed, no one, except those receiving a pre-paid fee from the bank, will be willing to be witnesses and/or to testify on behalf of the bank. This would be taking the libertarian ideals to it's max...Oh! So you thought it was fair for you rich business owners to squeeze the little guy? So, why doesn't the little guy squeeze back? If the businesses can't be "good citizens" doing their part...then neither can the citizens. To hell with these greedy hypocrite capitalist pigs! We can play their game too! Oh, you rich bankster did not pay me a fee? Then I know nothing and saw nothing about the men (or was it women?) that robbed your bank and beat up the bank managers.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 2 years 45 weeks ago
#2

Well, there are certainly a lot of executives in need of scrutiny...including Obama...but not in the frame that those who are trying to push this bill mean. Obama has been the ruling elite's best friend...after all, they paid him the most to win in 2008 and are doing so again for 2012. The Republican politicians would sure like to see Obama lose so they could take over....but, for the ruling elite?

The ruling elite doesn't mind seeing the funny little game that is being played, the Democrats against the Republicans, because they know that they have them both under their thumb. It's all theater! Smoke and mirrors. Bait and switch. Good cop, bad cop. Our real enemy is the ruling elite and they are the "gods" sitting in the clouds playing one "owned" party off against the other "owned" party and laughing their heads off at the calamity and p1$$!ng down on the heads of all of us little people...that's the real "trickle down" theory.

I've been to places where the ruling elite owned factories, with no enforceable laws to regulate air pollution, that belch forth filth in the air so thick that one had a very difficult time in breathing and the eyes constantly watered. My throat, nose, and lungs actually hurt...like I was slowly suffocating.

I felt sorry for the poor people that had to live in such an environment all the time. Most of the worst places were outside of the US, but a few within. The ones outside of the US were much worse. My stay in these places were only from days to several weeks at a time but they were quite unbearable. I do hope that it ever gets that bad in the US.

KassandraTroy's picture
KassandraTroy 2 years 45 weeks ago
#3

I'm of two minds about this and the "payroll tax holiday". Bush/Cheney set up SO MUCH Executive branch overreach that the Congress could be well within their rights.....IF this was applied to things other than regualtions, to "rein" it in.

Remember, it won't always be Obama ( thank the gods!) or a Tea bagger Congress (hopefully). The executive branch DOES need more checks.....and not fewer into the Social Security Trust fund via the "payroll tax holiday" that's a razzle-dazzle" anmd worded so that it sounds like it's WITH-HOLDING that's being cut. Instead, it will keep bleed ding SS until they can honestly say...."IT'S BROKE!"

I don't trust any of 'em at this point.

Alan Lunn's picture
Alan Lunn 2 years 45 weeks ago
#4

Under Republican Bush2 we saw exectutive power on steroids. Now we see Republicans taking away executive power (should Obama have a second term). Our government is not ours any more. We're the riff-raff. Neither the owners of the GOP (Government Occupation Plutocracy) nor the Republicans themselves have a conscience or any sense of real allegiance to the spirit of the Constitution. It's all a game now. And what a heinous game it is. Built on the blood of the fading middle class.

Shark's picture
Shark 2 years 45 weeks ago
#5

Fire every last one of them. It's not necessary to have a Republican President as long as they have power over anything the President does... as long as they have the filibuster... as long as they own th media.

Speaking of media - there's not a word about this - anywhere!!!!

We need to get an overwhelming "liberal" Democratic majority in both houses of Congress in order to accomplish anything for the people. The 99% are only beginning.

David Cantrell's picture
David Cantrell 2 years 45 weeks ago
#6

In regards to the senate & congress being able to over rule the white house, If I were president, I would declare martial law and order the military to shut down the entire capital (except for social security & medicare). Hold trials and try the perpertrators of these actions as traitors against the U.S., and put them where they will never see the light of day again, no matter how long it takes. Anyone who tried to violate martial law would be shot on the spot. Despirate times created by these criminals require despirate measures.

George Reiter's picture
George Reiter 2 years 45 weeks ago
#7

Here is a quote from the book "Theodore Roosevelt: The Rough Riders/An Autobiography:

To quote Theodore Roosevelt,"... his labor - was a perishable commodity; the labor of to-day - if not sold was a perishable commodity; the labor of to-day - if not sold to-day - was lost forever. Moreover, his labor was not like most commodities - a mere thing; it was part of a living, breathing human being."

Old Kel's picture
Old Kel 2 years 45 weeks ago
#8

I think it is important to get money out of politics. Campaigns should be publicly financed. Debate should be limited to real debate on the issues, point counter point, not grandstanding, and all networks would be obliged to broadcast them. Any untruths should be called such during the broadcast by the moderator based on the facts of the issues scheduled to be discussed.

I also think it equally important to get politics out of governing. Contrary to popular mis-conception, good government does not follow from "the art of compromise", and compromise has been scarce for several years now anyway. What is good for the country and it's peoples and lands should be the rule; not half or three quarters of the good. We deserve the whole good and nothing but the good, and that is what our government should provide...not compromise. Politics is all money and compromise and has become totally dysfunctional because there is no longer any compromise allowed, just a lot of money.

I believe it was Plato who said the only leader you should elect is one who does not want the job.

historywriter's picture
historywriter 2 years 45 weeks ago
#9

David

What a terrible idea--declaring martial law. Apart from its lack of practicality, you cannot fight one stupidity with another stupidity, or one act of "violence"--so I consider it--with another act of violence.

Write to your representatives. Write to newspapers. Go to your caucuses and vote on this issue. Go out and work for the Democrats who refuse to vote for anything this insane.

We do not need to throw military force at every objectionable thing our Congress does. We would be (and maybe are) an armed state.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 2 years 45 weeks ago
#10

The problem with "writing or phoning your 'elected' officials" is that they don't read or listen to your letters and phone calls. Aides, and perhaps even only machines scan for key words that inform them of the general mood of their constituents. And even then, the general mood of their constituents doesn't even really matter. It may make them worry a little more about being re-elected next time. But they mostly count on whomever is shelling out the big bucks to get them re-elected. So, they are, in effect, working for the ruing elite and not for those who vote for them...they believe that the campaign funds they receive will buy enough psychological influence of potential voters through a PR company that will keep us hypnotized with flashy commercials and lots of campaign promises (lies).

I believe that it has gotten to the point where what you write or say to your political representatives really does not matter because, in the end, the only thing that really matters to them are what the ruling elite, who bribes these politicians, want. It has gotten to the point where only one thing will change the outcome and that is not by writing letters, making phone calls, or voting.

As they have come to realize in so many other countries, where the people massively revolted against the ruling elite, it's the only thing that really works.

The massive uprisings of the OWS movement in many cities and towns in the US was enough to send a message. And if they don't get it...if they continue to believe that the people will just get back into the futile groove of voting for corporate-owned tweedle dee or tweedle dum..then they will have played us all for the suckers that we are.

But if the OWS movement grows and intensifies the ruling elite will eventually have to give in. It sure has worked more than voting has in the few weeks it has been in existence. The ruling elite is hoping they will all get tired and discouraged. I hope not!

Even if you had all Democrats in power...they would still not turn things around in favor of the 99%. Obama had the edge when he first took office. But not only did Obama not act like a Democrat but many Democrats did not act like Democrats. Many have already been bought off and are likely culpable for financial crimes themselves...insider trading by congressional members..both Republicans and Democrats.

The system has been corrupted and it is too late to expect a few honest politicians to turn things around. We have to learn from history that the only thing that will make the wealthy see that they had better quit being so greedy and hateful is to massively rebel against them...and not play their rigged game of Democrat/Republican politics. No "pressure" will come from voting the right person, or persons into office....the pressure will come from a nation on the edge of revolution.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 2 years 45 weeks ago
#11

Which one of the Tweedle-dummies do you think will be ultimately picked to run against Tweedle-Obama?

Tweedle- Romney or Tweedle-Trump? Tweedle-Cain is out...for now. I wonder how Tweedle-Paul would be? He says a lot of pleasant things..but then so did Tweedle-Obama when he was trying to get votes.

But, just like Tweedle-Obama, it really doesn't matter at all because they are all owned by Wall Street. They all blatantly lie their way into office, and have nice revolving doors to untold riches in the private sectors if they are good boys and do the bidding of their Wall Street masters.

All of those Tweedles in Congress are all owned by Wall Street...with the exception, maybe, of a few who have actually held their own against the wide-spread corruption.

The Greenies are looking promising!

PhilipHenderson's picture
PhilipHenderson 2 years 45 weeks ago
#12

Elect progressive Democrats until there are so few Republicans in Congress that they can do nothing. Give money to progressive Democrats. Help to support the campaigns of progressive Democrats. If you can find a Republican who does not kiss the ring of Grover Norquist, consider supporting the Republican.

dean123's picture
dean123 2 years 45 weeks ago
#13

Don't vote for Republicans.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 2 years 45 weeks ago
#14

I most wholeheartedly agree that we need a lot more progressive Democrats...if they REALLY ARE progressive Democrats.

chazzz77's picture
chazzz77 2 years 45 weeks ago
#15

This is a global problem @ has to be solved that way same has nuclear proliferation We all live or die together If gigrich does get in even his name tells you who he is for or buying all that stuff at tiffineys should give you a clue.We have to stop electing the riches guy at the table @ start electing the man who is best for the people.Tom love your show you do alot

2950-10K's picture
2950-10K 2 years 45 weeks ago
#16

"We The 99%" could rein in the 1% party with the creation of a National News Network that simply broadcasts the unbiased truth!

dlweirich's picture
dlweirich 2 years 45 weeks ago
#17

Thom,

This appears eerily similar to the events of the Supreme Court case, INS v. Chadha 462 U.S. 919 (1983). In Chadha, the ability of either house of Congress to override the decision of a federal agency was deemed unconstitutional. This REINS legislation would probably fall into the same category, and would therefore be unconstitutional.

Remember how the House Republicans, on entering office this past January, read the entire Constitution out loud (except for certain parts such as slavery)? Beat them over the head with the INS v. Chadha case, which this REINS legislation blatantly violates. If the Republicans won't call out the Supreme Court for the Citizens United ruling, they will have a hard time complaining about the Chadha decision.

arky12's picture
arky12 2 years 45 weeks ago
#18

I received this resonse from my Senator regarding the national def auth act. I made bold and underlined the part of it that concerns me and I believe everyone about this act.

Dear Ms. Zitko,

Thank you for contacting me regarding the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12) , and your concern related to detainee language in the bill . I appreciate hearing from you.

The FY12 NDAA authorize s funding to procure key hardware and munitions; funding to upgrade, re-supply and re-equip troops with basic equipment; and funding to support health and mental health care for military personnel and veterans. I was supportive of this bill and it passed the Senate on December 1, 2011, with a vote of 93-7.

One of the specific concerns you mentioned in your letter relates to particular detainee provisions in the bill. Section 1031 affirms existing law regarding how we deal with suspected terrorists. Furthermore, this section expressly notes there will be no change to current law on that matter. Section 1032 requires that members of al-Qaeda or associated forces be transferred to the military if they are captured in the course of hostilities. There is an express exemption for US citizens as well as an option to waive this requirement if in the interest of national security.

Overall, I believe these provisions provide viable options for both our military and law enforcement officials without compromising due process or national security. I will continue to monitor this situation and will certainly keep your thoughts in mind as this matter is further addressed in the Senate.

Again, thank you for contacting me. I value your input. Please do not hesitate to contact me or my office regarding this or any other matter of concern to you.

Sincerely,

Mark Pryor
United States Senate

ron943's picture
ron943 2 years 45 weeks ago
#19

I certainly don't wish violence on Republicans but I do think these unpatriotic bastards should be deported for treason. Who knows who their corporate masters are. They could be Chinese or Saudis or Emirati (Dubai) or who knows what else. They do not have the USA as their primary concern.

Douglas Murphy's picture
Douglas Murphy 2 years 45 weeks ago
#20

JP Morgan and 6 others met in the early 1900's to decide how they would monetize the United States. They decided they could monetize the US, ONLY if the vehicle would shelter them from the risk that comes with lending money to people and companies you dont know. This is the origin of the FDIC. Call it the backbone of fraud. Over the past century, there have been a continual stream of bailouts forced upon the people. Conrail, NYC Railroad, etc. The money of the people going to save these corporations that are 'too big to fail'. When you consider the collection of entities in charge of spending this nations money, they operate under the same principle, spending is fine, as the citizens are there for a bailout. This is almost like the directions on a bottle of shampoo, 'wash, rinse, repeat.'

Federal policy provides a path to freedom from obligations such as pensions, and the economic responsibility that comes with the power to affect the economy in dramatic fashion by erasing domestic jobs, make them foreign jobs, and doing so under the guise of being a Corporate Citizen. How is it that a Corporation with no HQ offices here in the US, not paying their taxes, can spend DIME ONE on a political campaign? Easy, the banks are truly the ones in control. Their Republican Right are their puppets, and occasionally they get a few Democrats to sell out the taxpayers, like Clinton did with NAFTA. Look into what Unilever did with Breyers. A 129 year old business, with $1.2 Billion in annual sales. They closed the plants and moved them to Russia in 2009. 1000 direct jobs lost, a third of that again for the suppliers, and a third of that again to the second tier. We didnt lose 1,000 jobs, we lost closer to 1600. Strong likelihood that lead to 300 to 400 foreclosures, which are also a part of the bailout. How about a Blight Tax, which may be levied as long as that company has been in business, and as long as the Brand Name is sold, and as long as the owners of the brand are in business selling to that market under any brand name..

I say enough. We need to recind their right to spend directly. I dont know if it can be done by petition, but a petition is the only way to get enough voice to be heard on a single item. As a country, we can STOP paying the collection of crooks by discontinuing to purchase products and brands that are not held by companies truly housing their HQ in the USA, and are participating in the Tax System, instead of being a blight. Unilever is one, Whirlpool another, Kraft is teetering. All of the largest banks that hold our personal debt do not HQ here in the USA. We HAVE TO TURN OUR BACK ON THEM.

Since they are leveraging the International Monetary Fund, which is also largely underwritten by US Dollars to bail out European countries, that level of urgency cannot be any higher.

These people are not connected to normalcy. We have to take away their power. The election method is not working. Consuers need to turn their backs. We need help from civic leaders to affect local ordinance and policy to box out the thieves.

It will be painful. But it has to happen. Waiting for Capital Hill to act in our interests is already too late.

Clarissa Smith's picture
Clarissa Smith 2 years 45 weeks ago
#21

"How do you think we can rein in the Republican Party?"

Frankly I've given up on them. I don't waste my nerves and time on convicted right-wingers. I'm rather trying to reach out to those who are possibly ready, able and willing to move. They need to be educated and I try to do my part to make them more critical. After all it's the common fellow American who votes for Republicans, so we have to change them. Anyway I think those shocking things we see in the GOP are an exact mirror image of the low education level of the average American citizen -- we have to do something about it. Well, actually you do work on it, and it's great work (that's why I'm here). I'm going to express my view now -- what I experienced these days as ex-unpolitical film blogger:

As I saw on my blog again: Americans don't eat so easily what hurts their national vanity. I 'abused' Pearl Harbor day to remind of the end of the 30s protest/occupy movement. This is why America developed so awfully unpolitical and silly since World War II. I compared the sophisticated 30s Jean Arthur type to the 40s/50s stupid Marilyn Monroe type. The birth of the "ugly American". My message on my blog occupied sweet&hot is: "Prefer critical 30s movies, and watch the uncritical 40s and 50s more critically!" I'm not ready anymore to discuss Hollywood love stories and the beautiful dress an actress wore on the 1939 Oscar award. Many Americans like to hear that silly stuff, but they don't get it anymore -- I want to educate (as much as I can as amateur)!

Frankly my Peal Harbor article was a flop. Normally American readers dominate on my blog, but suddenly I had more Russians(!!). Yesterday I published a more positive message: The 30s forgotten man is back in 2011 and how to express it via improvising the 30s music style of the movie Gold Diggers of 1933. Well, Americans obviously like to eat that -- suddenly they click like crazy and that's alright with me. I told 'em how to consider the political messages in this film. The occupy movement is not just hippies, we're those 30s guys as well. Feed 'em a little political honey after the Pearl Harbor blow. Poor suffering Americans -- I love them!

I'm gonna show 'em the female type of the "ugly American" -- I was drawing 'her' yesterday. Before that I looked 'her' up via googling various images of 'her': Fat, butterfly glasses, hair more yellow than blonde, screwy, grotesque -- just terrible. You don't wanna look like that. There's your average GOP-voter, folks! ..... You really don't wanna look like that LOL.

ginico55's picture
ginico55 2 years 45 weeks ago
#22

PASS THE WORD . . . OUR THEME FOR 2012 . . . SAVE OUR COUNTRY, VOTE OUT A REPUBLICAN!

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