Who is the Enemy in the Afghanistan "War"?

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In 1994 the US brought to power the Taliban, Koran students raised in Pakistan's refugee camps. From this fundamentalist Stone Age troop, the US hoped for stable political conditions to lay pipelines across Afghanistan for natural gas and crude oil production from Turkmenistan to the Indian Ocean. This Taliban created its own brutal social order and offered refugee and training to the Saudi Bin Laden and his Al Qaida organization.

Attacking Afghanistan on account of Al Qaida would be like bombing Germany on account of the skinheads. No one can seriously believe terrorists can be defeated with aircraft carriers, missiles, fighter bombers and tanks.

Do German soldiers only defend the US' superpower claim at Hindukusch, not German security?

to read Heidemarie Blankenstein's article published in: Freitag 4/4/2010, click on


demandside's picture
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm


Actually, it's not a war but an occupation. The problem seems to be a legacy of the ignorance and incompetency of the Bush administration. There is only a political solution to Afghanistan, that more than likely has to include the Taliban. Also, there must be regional buy-in from the likes of Pakistan and Iran for stability to take hold.

One of the core problems is that it appears that Afghanistan society runs on "corruption". This may be a poor word, because it may be "normal" for tribal societies as the powerful are afforded certain privileges so long as they provide basic necessities such as security. This may be the way things will operate until the majority of the people see that the central government must be stronger than the local warlord. It may take a while to evolve. Which makes me think that the "problem" is more our belief in American style democracy than what is happening in Afghanistan.

jeffbiss's picture
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

The enemy are the Pushtan. They are an ancient nation of twenty million which who's land is intersected by the Afghan-Pakistan border. They have a self-governing familial-tribal heirarchy independent of both the Afghan and Pakistani governments. Their median age is 17 which is perfect for a warrior people. They will never let any government run their lives. They will never be converted into accepting democracy. They only way for the U.S. to accomplish its goal of bringing democracy to all of Afghanistan is to butcher them all. Since this isn't politically feasible, the U.S. can never 'win' and should probably change its aim to dominating a smaller portion of the country or just withdraw altogether.

Austro-Libertarian's picture
Apr. 10, 2010 7:31 am

Income Inequality Has Gone Up

The chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, Jason Furman, recently wrote in the Washington Post that "Last year saw the largest single-year reduction in poverty since the 1960s."

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