Oil Spill is a Win Win for Developers

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hereticus
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Now that all of the wetlands along the Gulf Coast are going to die, property values will plummet. This along with the fact that there will be no negative environmental impact  when developers buy up miles of dead shoreline at low prices and develop this entire coastal region into the new Gulf Riviera, I find only new business opportunities for this region.

Third generation fishermen can be retrained, just as we did for the multitudes of Americans as their jobs were exported Mexico, Asia and anywhere cheap labor could be found.

I see dollar signs for savvy developers.

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Poor Richard
Poor Richard's picture
hereticus wrote: I see dollar

hereticus wrote:

I see dollar signs for savvy developers.

What else is new?

Maybe some of the opportunists will be green free-enterprise entrepreneurs, worker-owned companies, citizen associations, environmental mitigation companies, etc.

May we live in interesting times!

I like your handle, hereticus.

Poor Richard

Poor Richard's Almanack 2010

GreenMule
GreenMule's picture
'Beyond this point there be

'Beyond this point there be Dragons' no longer applies to the ancient maps as it concerns the Gulf of Mexico.  A pseudo-pristine water of death will make it an ideal place for the new Monte Carlo.  It's the end of Shark Attacks and Man-of-War Stings.  It will become the optimal zone to prevent underwater spying / attacks against the USA.  The Top Kill that began with the early European Settlers, as in removing threatening animals and food for Native Americans, has been revisited as the Bottom Kill, as in removing threatening / all sea creatures.  There is nothing new under the Sun as in the Defunct American Farmer, so goes the Defunct American Fisherman.  Giant corporations took over the once independent business of farming.  Farming has become Cow, Pig & Edible Plant Cities.  Mix in copious amounts of genetics, chemicals, and cruelty to equate with the American Diet.  People have become so evil as to work the Bee to death to increase their output of honey.  I can envision others going to a Corporate Owned Aquarium, as in Farmed Raised Sea Food, to make a purchase / to dine in.  One man's trash, as in Gulf of Mexico, is an other man's treasure...I think.      

douglaslee
douglaslee's picture
Quote: I can envision others

Quote:

I can envision others going to a Corporate Owned Aquarium, as in Farmed Raised Sea Food, to make a purchase / to dine in.

I think it will be more of the people being food, like the movie from '60s or '70s.

Another minor point is why the travesty keeps being referred to as a spill. You have to have something before you spill it. I think this is more like a fatal infection, and BP/Halliburton were carriers, though they themselves were immune. 

 

 

 

meljomur
meljomur's picture
Apparently the initial author

Apparently the initial author of this post has never seen the Niger Delta to look at the LONG term impact of oil seeping into the water.  It destroys the entire coastal region.

Why would any "savvy" developer want to invest in an area like that?

SueN
SueN's picture
Developers are quick to build

Developers are quick to build over contaminated land if they think they can get away with it. Love Canal, for example. if the land is ultra cheap because it is contaminated, they can afford to cover it over with concrete and still make a profit.

Add a few artifical lakes and rivers for fisherman, etc, and they will be able to have gated enclaves. And th poor will live in the surroundings because they need the jobs.

Any contaminated fish and plants still surving can be sold to countries with lower standards. 

And with the damage already done, it will be easier to do more drilling.

Tourism and fresh sea fishing may be drastically reduced, and the lives and livelihoods of those living in contaminated areas may be devastatetd, but there will be winners. Capitalism will march on.

meljomur
meljomur's picture
Perhaps Sue, but I do

Perhaps Sue, but I do question the sanity of the person who would actually pay money to live in such an environment?

Proving once again you don't have to be too bright to have alot of money...

hereticus
hereticus's picture
Here we go. The dredging of

Here we go. The dredging of the coast is a precursor for a new deep-water port to service oil tankers. Then comes economical development of the Louisiana coast. In about five years, the oil smell will dissipate. As long as you do not eat the fish, or drink the water, your exposure will be minimal. In ten years, land values will skyrocket. In twenty years, the coast will be developed, relatively oil free, and a very nice place to live, if you have money.

Next year, I may take a trip down there and buy a property at tax auction for $1,000, or not.

Don't get me wrong. This situation sucks. I love the gulf, the seafood and many of the locals. I thought about moving there before this mess happened. I guess I will stay on Maui for now. No oil wells here, just volcanoes and hurricanes.

meljomur
meljomur's picture
Except for the fact that it

Except for the fact that it isn't just an oil smell, its a toxin which long term exposure to can result in cancer and other life threatening illnesses.  Not to mention birth defects in babies.  The list is endless.

Yes, go spend your money there.  I mean you have to die sometime, and just as long as you are past child bearing years, that won't be an issue either.

Seriously, people are ignorant to the REAL hazards of this type of prolonged spill.  You can cement over it all you want, doesn't change what's there, and it certainly doesn't change the threat.

I tell you what if I lived in that region, I would move out as fast as I could, and quite honestly never return.

hereticus
hereticus's picture
I lived on a ship for many

I lived on a ship for many years. The water in the shower smelled of JP4 jet fuel. When you showered, you got coated with it and you felt like you were slimed. I worked on airplanes since I was eighteen. . I have been exposed to so many carcinogens I would be shocked, shocked I tell you, if I do not get cancer at some point in my future. That, along with my sedentary lifestyle,  drinking diet Pepsi and eating pork sushi,

When I was a child, I watched the oil trucks spray oil on the dirt roads to keep down the dust, as the DDT sprayer fogged the forests and swamps to kill the mosquitoes. While all of this was going on, I was sucking on  pistachios covered in red #4 dye which had been proven to cause cancer in rats. Good thing I was not a rat.

I suspect most of the social security payments I made will go to someone else after the stroke I will inevitably suffer will end my life.

On the other hand, I may live to ninety, at which time I die in a water skiing accident in the Gulf of Texico.

But seriously, I understand where you are coming from.

Poor Richard
Poor Richard's picture
hereticus wrote: Next year, I

hereticus wrote:

Next year, I may take a trip down there and buy a property at tax auction for $1,000, or not.

Buy plenty of extra acreage or stay a few feet above sea level because the lowest topographical elevation (most fouled)  will go under water as polar and glacial ice melts. Look for corporations with large portfolios of such "future waterfront" now and in the near future.

Great user name, Hereticus!