So what is REALLY happening with the Gulf "spill"

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I imagine I am not the only one on this board, who thought it was a bit odd how all of a sudden the stories about the Gulf disaster just seemed to stop (well especially in the American media).

I mean, seriously did millions of gallons of oil just disappear? And what happens to that highly toxic dispersant they have been pouring into the Gulf?

I found this article in the Guardian today.

[quote] Scientists have mapped a 22-mile plume of oil droplets from BP's rogue well in the depths of the Gulf of Mexico, providing the strongest evidence yet of the fate of the crude that spewed into the sea for months.

The report offers the most authoritative challenge to date to White House assertions that most of the 5m barrels of oil that spewed into the Gulf is gone.

"These results indicate that efforts to book-keep where the oil went must now include this plume," said Christopher Reddy one of the members of the team from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.

The report, which is published in the journal Science, also said the plume was very slow to break down by natural forces, increasing the likelihood that oil could have travelled long distances in the Gulf before it was degraded.

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meljomur
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I imagine I am not the only one on this board, who thought it was a bit odd how all of a sudden the stories about the Gulf disaster just seemed to stop (well especially in the American media).

You may have been. I think this lack of interest is due primarily to the way Americans think, and not just due to the media. For example, most of the concern discussed about the effects of the oil spill were centered around the economic impact, whether people would be able to make money from the Gulf, with far less concern about less materialistic effects such as on wildlife. for example, take a look at polling, such as the GULF OIL SPILL POLL, and you'll see that people are more concerned with their ability to carry on as before as "48% favor increasing drilling for oil and gas in coastal waters, up from 45 percent in June."

If Americans were actually concerned about the effects that their behavior had then there'd have been an increase in the opinion that we live more efficiently, to use less oil and reduce the need for drilling off shore. Don't expect too much from people, especially self centered Americans and you will never be disappointed or surprised by their callousness.

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jeffbiss
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Well jeff, what came first the chicken (disinterested Americans) or the egg (poor media)?

So what is happening with the fishing industry in the Gulf? Who is going to be eating Gulf shrimp in the near future? What about the tourist industry? I read just the other week that it has dropped over 60% since the whole oil disaster started.

These scenarios must be hurting some people's pocket books.

Its pretty sad and scary to think this whole event has been largely forgotten. Will anyone be that shocked when cancer rates go up and birth defects increase in the area?

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meljomur
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm
Well jeff, what came first the chicken (disinterested Americans) or the egg (poor media)?

I think that the disinterested American came first, which created poor media. Had we been interested we would have refused poor media.

As for your questions about the effects on the locals, I think that they are concerned only with their immediate future, as shown by their push to get off shore drilling going. Cancer is only a concern when one gets it, but everyone wants money now, and the probability of getting cancer is small when compared with having no income now.

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jeffbiss
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

As BPs ad say's, their ready and waiting for when the oil comes ashore. Sad

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EdBourgeois
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May. 14, 2010 11:24 am

Mother Jones has a great article about the BP cover-up. It takes something like Mother Jones to do what all media should be doing.

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jeffbiss
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

I was vacationing last week, and so was exposed to TV (I don't have one, on purpose, and thus don't watch it normally). I was appalled at the amount of BP commercials during the evening news.

That should tell you everything you need to know.

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Common_Man_Jason
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jeff, (sorry I meant to come back to this topic sooner)

What about the economic destruction which has been done to the fishing industry and tourism in the Gulf region? Not everyone in the area works in the oil industry?

I read recently that the Gulf is the largest producer of shrimp in the country. Who in their right mind (okay no pun intended) is going to buy and eat Gulf shrimp for the next few years?

And tourism accounts for much of Florida's economy (not oil). Aren't these people being financially devastated by this "spill"?

Are that many Americans really that stupid?

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meljomur
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

The new is controlled by Rupert and his Orcs. We will probably never see another BP story--unless Godzilla rises from the oil slick.

kwikfix
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Apr. 9, 2010 12:51 pm
What about the economic destruction which has been done to the fishing industry and tourism in the Gulf region? Not everyone in the area works in the oil industry?

From what I've heard and seen, Louisianans fully support the oil industry. They may be mad about BP right now, but their anger is structured around jobs, and as soon as BP hires them they appear to forgive. They want BP to clean up and get back to work. Most see the Gulf as a resource to be exploited, and cared about only to the extent that it can continue to meet their needs.

I read recently that the Gulf is the largest producer of shrimp in the country. Who in their right mind (okay no pun intended) is going to buy and eat Gulf shrimp for the next few years?

Not me ever, but I'm a vegetarian. and why should I worry about these shrimpers? I just read in that Mother Jones' article that many of them, worried about the shut-down, simply closed the mandatory TEDs, that they fought hard against, to catch as many shrimp as possible and knowingly drowned any turtles that couldn't escape their nets. Great people.

And tourism accounts for much of Florida's economy (not oil). Aren't these people being financially devastated by this "spill"?

I'd guess yes to a point, but BP has been filling rooms with workers and stuff.

Are that many Americans really that stupid?

Yep. They really are. Just take a look at our behavior, it's totally disconnected from what we say. We said that what happened in the Gulf is horrible yet we refuse to use less energy or push for ever increasing energy efficiencies for everything we use. So, yes we are a nation of self-centered idiots.

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jeffbiss
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

The Gulf has been dying for some time. Big Ag is polluting it with runoff from industrial farming going down the Mississippi and into the Gulf.

The BP spill is just the death blow.

The oil is out of sight...not out of the Gulf. The world's 7th largest body of water is in its death throes.. It's land counterpart would be the vast Sahel...turning into desert...another dead zone.... from human activity.

The Gulf Crisis is Not Over Slow Violence and the BP Coverups

http://www.counterpunch.org/mcclintock08232010.html

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

polycarp2
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Well, here's some new news about what researchers found about microbial action on the oil.

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jeffbiss
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm
Quote jeffbiss:

Well, here's some new news about what researchers found about microbial action on the oil.

So jeff, do you think this is a positive development? I read the article, and while it seems like a good thing; the scientist are still unsure of how these new microbial with ultimately effect the life of the Gulf. It seems early days on the eventual outcome.

BTW, why haven't there been more studies on this toxic dispersant which has been poured into the Gulf? According to my husband (he has been in the oil industry for almost 25 years) this dispersant can actually be worse for the Gulf than the oil itself.

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meljomur
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Oh as a side note, I too am a vegetarian, however I still realize that many people make their living off of fishing. Its a big industry in America, and just because I don't eat the stuff they catch, doesn't mean I don't recognize that many people's livelihoods have been devastated.

As far as catching turtles in the nets. There should be federal laws around shrimping, but perhaps they are as lax as the regulation for the oil industry.

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meljomur
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Louisiana fishermen net more cash working for BP

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/22f0dc08-ae19-11df-bb55-00144feabdc0.html

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stwo
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm
So jeff, do you think this is a positive development? I read the article, and while it seems like a good thing; the scientist are still unsure of how these new microbial with ultimately effect the life of the Gulf. It seems early days on the eventual outcome.

I think it merely indicates that nature can take care of this and that we should not add to the mess through harmful technology, such as with dispersants.

BTW, why haven't there been more studies on this toxic dispersant which has been poured into the Gulf? According to my husband (he has been in the oil industry for almost 25 years) this dispersant can actually be worse for the Gulf than the oil itself.

As far as I can tell it's due to the Toxic Substances Control Act in that it doesn't require companies to prove their chemicals safe nor tell what's in them. Essentially, it's due to business control of our government. All chemicals should be controlled and many not allowed to be manufactured and used, but we'd need an objective process to do that and with companies running the asylum that won't happen.

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jeffbiss
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

:A dying Gulf.......on film:

http://videocafe.crooksandliars.com/node/38092

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

polycarp2
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

FYI. The latest addition to BP's propaganda arsenal was on the Weather Channel yesterday.

It asserts that a lot of oil from downed WWII vessels may start leaking and showing up in the oceans.

So when oil starts showing up again we should think it's from WWII - not the BP disaster.

Also seems strange that a craft was able to revisit the site of the Titanic (even though Mother Nature chased it away the first time, messing up the original timing of the media distraction event - away from the 5-year anniversary of the Katrina/FEMA debacle) - yet we are somehow not able to get any institutional crafts down to look at the floor of the gulf.

Biggest disaster in the Gulf and we can't task a sub or two?

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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

In early March, the Senate passed its version of the RESTORE Act by an overwhelming bipartisan margin. The RESTORE Act directs 80 percent of the penalties that will have to be paid by BP and others responsible for the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil disaster to Gulf Coast restoration, potentially directing as much as $15 - $20 billion to Gulf restoration. The RESTORE Act would be the single largest investment ever made Congress in environmental restoration. The Senate bill also included another provision that provides $1.5 billion in funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which protects precious lands across America. Audubon President David Yarnold called the strong bipartisan vote in favor of these two measures "a moment for hope and healing...the most important conservation victory in a decade."

However, final passage of these measures was delayed when the House and Senate failed to agree on a final version of the transportation bill, the larger bill that contains these vital conservation measures. Both the House and the Senate have voted strongly in favor of RESTORE Act principles, however. When Congress returns from the spring recess, it will take up the transportation bill again.

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