10/10/10 climate events

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Starting now, people at 7347 events in 188 countries are getting to work on the climate crisis.

People are digging community gardens, installing solar panels, planting trees and more. We’re sending a clear message to our political leaders: “if we can get to work, so can you!”

Learn more about 10/10/10

More at 350.org

I walked to the shops wearing my 350 T shirt and bought a solar battery charger.

What did you do?

SueN's picture
SueN
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

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Harvested beets, zuchini, bell peppers and cilantro from my organic raised bed gardens. Going to expand garden area for next year.

Choco's picture
Choco
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Today specifically I zero-scaped a 5-plex I own and installed a drip system for what will be native trees instead of the water sucking blue grass that was there when I bought it.

10/10/10 has got to be everyday though..

This year I...

Harvested tomatoes, squash, broccoli, pumpkins, strawberries, cucumber, hot peppers, rhubarb, and planted grapes, raspberries, pears, plumbs for next year, and replanted most of yard to buffalo grass which is a low water drought resistant grass native to my area.

And then I'm self-canning w/ a pressure cooker and reusable glass mason jars what I can't use.

Composted all organic matter that was not edible.

Remodeled an old barn behind my house and turned it into a garage instead of building a new garage from new materials.. involved putting on a tin roof, reinforcing existing 2x4's and cross bracing.

Made my driveway, for the garage, out of recycled runway asphalt. It is high grade, and cost $6 a square foot. Mulch costs about $30 per square foot. Entire 75ft driveway cost about $100-200.

Remodeled my entire house.. refinished floors which were bare wood (instead of buying new), put a smooth coat of mud and painted old worn out drywall (instead of new drywall), put an extra R31 layer of insulation in attic (to save heat), put an extra double glazed pane of glass over single pane windows, then put thermal blinds and thermal curtains made in the USA inside.

Installed a multi-fuel pellet stove (made in the USA) which uses wood, corn, cherry pits, olive pits, biomass pellets, or newspaper pellets. Wood pellets are a byproduct of forest thinning and made in the USA. Fuel is 90% efficient and puts out cold air via direct vent (all heat is used by stove).

I'm looking into wind and solar power, I'm buying a wind gauge so I can see if getting a small 1000watt turbine would be worth it.

I bought all my clothes from goodwill. $60 shirts made by Ralph Lauren, Tommy Hilf., Polo, Nautica etc cost $3ea.

I bought 3 clothes racks to put in front of my pellet stove so I don't have to use an electric dryer during winter.

I am considering putting recycling bins for tenants in the unrented basement portion of a 5-plex I rent out. I don't have a truck though so not sure how it will work transporting it out.. I might get a small truck since I do lots of remodeling work in my spare time, a small 4 cyl. diesel truck and then I could make bio-diesel fuel from old cooking oil via filtration and then mixing in lye..

I'm still thinking of other ways. They mostly all save money. I was thinking about washing clothes by hand in my upstairs bathroom tub since I don't use it for anything else.

makuck's picture
makuck
Joined:
Mar. 31, 2010 10:13 pm
Quote makuck:10/10/10 has got to be everyday though..

Enjoyed your list.

Make up some compost tea brews to stimulate the soils where your making the nice landscape transitions and plantings.

EdBourgeois's picture
EdBourgeois
Joined:
May. 14, 2010 12:24 pm

In an effort to change my investment in solar panels from a total waste to something productive, I converted my lighting to DC. Replacing the incandescent lights with LED and florescent bulbs that run on direct current provided by batteries, has proven to be very efficient and economical. My solar panels do much (but not all) of the battery charging, so not only is my lighting almost free, the ROI was just 6 months.

Paleo-con
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm
Quote Paleo-con:

In an effort to change my investment in solar panels from a total waste to something productive, I converted my lighting to DC. Replacing the incandescent lights with LED and florescent bulbs that run on direct current provided by batteries, has proven to be very efficient and economical. My solar panels do much (but not all) of the battery charging, so not only is my lighting almost free, the ROI was just 6 months.

OMG, I am glad I had swallowed my water before I read this post, because it made me laugh really hard (not its intention I suspect).

Every other post on here is about doing something to save the environment. And while you are obviously doing just that, you are far more interested in how much money it saves you. I guess that means if it wasn't cheaper, you wouldn't do it.

Oh god, you conservatives are so nuts!

meljomur's picture
meljomur
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Oh and my 10/10/10 commitment is to only buy British made food. (which surprisingly is not that difficult in this country).

I wish I could garden, but I live in a communal building with shared gardens. So I do the next best thing and try to shop at farmers markets and buy only British produce, dairy, meat and fish (for the husband).

I walk almost everywhere, and if its too far I ride the Tube or the bus. We don't own a car.

meljomur's picture
meljomur
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

I'm impressed with all of you.

I've nothing against saving money, being more self sufficient, buying locally, etc. And they very often fit hand in glove with being environmentally friendly, particularly if you take the long view (that is, for at least the duration of your own possisble life span, if not your children's and grandchildren's). Getting a speedy return on investment is encouraging and sets you up to be in a position to do something further.

This year I've harvested runner beans, peas, tomatoes, raspberries, blackberries, blackcurrants, blueberries, apples, potatoes, parsley, lettuce and other salad leaves, mint, a variety of herbs, etc., etc. and I have been expanding my vegetable garden. Now if only it stays dry long enough for me to dig some more!

My biggest step though is going to be downsizing; moving to a smaller, easier to heat and maintain house and freeing up capital for solar roof panels on it, etc. I don't have the capital to do anything major on this one, however much it would save me. So I am busy sorting out as much as possible for chariity shops or recycling.

SueN's picture
SueN
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

I make my own jam, apple sauce, etc in glass jars from my own produce, and freeze small amounts of excess. I've not tried canning yet.

I have 4 compost bins and 2 rainwater butts. I'm lucky to have very good recycling facilities here.

I've bought some clothes from charity shops, but they have very little in my size/shape unfortunately.

I have dramatically decreased my mileage by working from home and walking to the shops where possible.

I don't have a clothes drier, the clothes just hang in a spare room.

The next project is probably to renovate my bicycle, which I haven't used for maybe 3 years. That will bring a few more shops in range without driving.

The next area to look at is permaculture. I also need to take a holistic view at solar for when I move, because as Paleo-con found out, it is not enough to just buy a solar panel or 2 and think that will save you money and save greenhouse gases. You have to study your energy needs. But good for you for going solar, Paleo-con.

With me it is a gradual thing, taking one small step at a time, but they all add up. Of course, that will change for a while when I move, as I'll have the capital for all the things I can't afford to do here.

Makuck, how did you find the time and energy for all that?


SueN's picture
SueN
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm
Quote meljomur:

Every other post on here is about doing something to save the environment. And while you are obviously doing just that, you are far more interested in how much money it saves you. I guess that means if it wasn't cheaper, you wouldn't do it.

Oh god, you conservatives are so nuts!

No, Mel, if it wasn't cheaper, I would not do it. Not everyone here has the benefit of that sizable bank account. Do you really think most people, especially the poor or middle class, would adopt green technology if it increased the cost of their day to day living? Don't you think more people would adopt green technology is it was proven to save them money?

Okay, two scenarios of me speaking to friends and neighbors...

1) I switched to DC lighting and it paid for itself in 6 months. Now my electric bills are 25% lower.

2) I switched to DC lighting, but it cost me twice as much to light the house. But at least I'm saving the world.

Which one do you truly believe would encourage more people of moderate means to switch and in the long run help us be more energy efficient?

Paleo-con
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Sorry Sue, I should not have mocked Paleo for his solar panels. I just found it ironic that what motivated him to become more environmentally conscious was primarily financial gain. It just seems an odd way to look at preserving the environment.

BTW, Sue. I have to comment on how pleasantly surprised I am at how easy it is to buy and eat almost exclusively British food. I am so impressed that this seems to be such a big priority in this country.

meljomur's picture
meljomur
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Paleo, I understand what you are saying. I was just struck by how your primary motivation was financial gain.

But I guess its a good thing that solar panels do make lighting cheaper. However, I imagine once those energy companies in America figure this out, that trend may change quickly.

meljomur's picture
meljomur
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

SueN: Makuck, how did you find the time and energy for all that?

My family helps me, I have a very supportive wife.

I do most of that stuff for fun. But it's definitely been hard, I haven't had a day of R&R in about 1yr! I'm gonna relax this winter before I make any big projects for myself.

PaleoCon: I switched to DC lighting and it paid for itself in 6 months. Now my electric bills are 25% lower.

Direct current is more for solar. Makes sense that you're using it. I'd love to see more cons give into the fact that solar saves money in the long run.

Alternating current is more efficient if you're tapping the grid. Voltage makes a huge difference too. Baseboard heater connected directly to a 220v breaker in your circuit breaker box is going to be much more efficient than a plug in ceramic heater. There is much more resistance with a ceramic heater is the layman's way to put it.. not going into frequencies etc.

makuck's picture
makuck
Joined:
Mar. 31, 2010 10:13 pm

BTW, Sue. I have to comment on how pleasantly surprised I am at how easy it is to buy and eat almost exclusively British food. I am so impressed that this seems to be such a big priority in this country.

The important thing is that we have good labeling, so we know where our food is coming from. Not much point deciding to choose local food if you cannot tell where it is from. Of course, not everything grows here, the US has a far wider range of climates, I think.

SueN's picture
SueN
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Yea, the US has a much wider range of climates. Everything form temperate rain forest in the north west to dessert in the mid-south. The greater the spread from the equator the greater the climate spread. Of course shipping from Washington to Texas is about as feasible as shipping from the country Chile to the mid-west (which is done). So even if you're in the US buying food grown in the US it might not be as local as you think... Britain is different, all of Britain is smaller than most US states. If you're in Britain buying food from Britain you can be sure it's local.

makuck's picture
makuck
Joined:
Mar. 31, 2010 10:13 pm

"Local" is very much a subjective thing. The one concern here is that something that may have been grown right next door to you could have been shipped a long (to us) distance by a major food chain to one of their major distribution centres, only to be shipped back again to the local store. So if we really want to be local, it is best not to buy from the supermarkets, but from a local source.

SueN's picture
SueN
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

It would be great if Britain were self sufficient in food, but we just don't have the climate for some healthy fooods that we have all got used to, like bananas and citrus fruit, and we have got used to having some foods all year round whcih can only be produced here during a limited season.

I try to restrict my foreign food purchases to those items which are really valuable for a healthy die; I buy seasonal British food as much as possible.

Unfortunately, thanks to the free market, I have seen many apple orchards dug up and instead of getting British apples, we get most of ours from France or New Zealand. I mostly avoid those. We have a wide range of suppliers, particularly from the Commonwealth and the European market. But we get stuff from the USA too, like raspberries when they are not in season here (Scottish ones are best, though).

When buying from abroad, it is not enough to simply buy the food that comes the shortest distance. There can be more CO2 produced by flying in food from a relatively short distance than food brought by ship from the other side of the world. Nowadays supermarkets are labelling food brought in by air.

It's not easy being green, but very satisfying. :)

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SueN
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

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