Ancient humans interbred with us

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I came across this story on the BBC, and I find it fascinating. It has long been suspected that some humans interbred with Neandertals, but a recent discovery found a previously undisclosed type of ancient human in Asia -- and their DNA lives on in at least some modern people.

Here are some details.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12059564

Ancient humans, dubbed 'Denisovans', interbred with us

By Pallab Ghosh

Science correspondent, BBC News

Scientists say an entirely separate type of human identified from bones in Siberia co-existed and interbred with our own species.

The ancient humans have been dubbed "Denisovans" after the caves in Siberia where their remains were found.

There is also evidence that this population was widespread in Eurasia.

A study in Nature journal shows that Denisovans co-existed with Neanderthals and interbred with our species - perhaps around 50,000 years ago.

will in chicago's picture
will in chicago
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

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Yeah, there's lots of news about pre history after the de coding of the neanderthal and homo sapiens genomes. Some neanderthal dna has been found in all homo sapiens populations except native africans. therefore, they met up and got together in the mid east. also, the roles of homo heidelbergensis and homo antecessor are in question. Both of those species seemed to have participated in cannibalism. There is a new study showing that homo sapiens and homo neanderthalis were descended from homo heidelbergensis, but what was the role of homo antecessor? It all seems to bolster the theory of regional development and accentuating differences between modern races. Also, neanderthal males seemed to have had high testosterone levels, ergo more sexually aggressive.

Personally, I don't see how we made it as a species at all before women started shaving their underarms..:D

harry ashburn
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

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