Rep. Issa: Fascism is Here!

61 posts / 0 new

Comments

If you are doing a deep redesign on the concept of "free markets," you need to get that revision into your posts. Otherwise you will be responsible for our reading them as defenses of the "free market" in the commons sense of use. I think the term is deeply misleading because "free market" is something that requires design and control. It does not happen by getting government out of the economy.

You are arguing with the wrong people if you think Progressives oppose the vibrant free market outside the Commons. It is the battle for the ownership of the Commons that defines the ideological differences between "Free Market" ideologues and economic realists who support a strong state hand on the economy to insure fairness and social responsibility. Your references to the "nanny state" reflect an ideology about government that I find deeply unhealthy and polemical. Those who warn about "nanny states" are too ready to provide the "bully state" to keep people in line when the economic austerity kicks in.

The idea that we don't need any infrastructure of prosperity and security to help us in our economic and political lives, you know, all those things governments do with our taxes, is what I oppose as ideological dogma. Economies are social reality zones, and ideologues of individualized "freedom" do not recognize social reality sufficiently to get the interdependence. Free education and healthcare are just the investments we could make in collective prosperity; but we choose to do it the ineffective individualized way. The results are that others are moving ahead of us because they are being realistic and we are not.

DRC's picture
DRC
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Excellent comments, DRC, esp.:

Quote DRC:

Your references to the "nanny state" reflect an ideology about government that I find deeply unhealthy and polemical. Those who warn about "nanny states" are too ready to provide the "bully state" to keep people in line when the economic austerity kicks in....

...Free education and healthcare are just the investments we could make in collective prosperity; but we choose to do it the ineffective individualized way. The results are that others are moving ahead of us because they are being realistic and we are not.

Speaking of fascism—Issa is bad, but look at Obama today, with a bankster-corporatist whispering in his Left ear now: http://www.democracynow.org/2011/1/7/from_wall_street_to_the_white

Zenzoe
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Now that Obama's love affair with Wall Street has been made public with his new Chief of Staff appointment, Michelle should probably file for divorce.

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

polycarp2
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

That's a good one, poly.

Zenzoe
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

I'm still trying to understand how a representative of Congress desiring to hold meetings with his constituents can be called fascism. I would say that's called a representative democracy. That's Issa's job. He's supposed to talk to his constituents and find out what they want.

If Issa exclusively met with only CEOs of major corporations, ok, then we can say that's an issue....but it isn't fascism. That's called not doing the business of the people.

If Issa writes legislation or votes for legislation that is fascist, then one could make the claim.

FreeMarketeer's picture
FreeMarketeer
Joined:
Oct. 11, 2010 11:00 am

FM, his "constituents" appeared to be from the conservative side of Commerce where "regulations" are evil, not necessary. Unless you mean the rules they get to write to their advantage, and then it is that old private/public partnership in fleecing the public.

That is not democracy or free government; and it is not how private business can run the best free market economy to serve a healthy democracy.

The problem with Issa is that he does not listen to other voices than his business buddies and their club talk about public policies. This leads him to believe a lot of pure ideological crap and to mislead instead of participate in solving problems.

There are some legitimate complaints when Commerce is isolated from the public policy formation; but when they come as hostiles it is hard to work with them. When they renege on agreements and sabotage policies with poison pills and floods of cash, they declare themselves the enemies of democracy. If we had the strong government we needed, they would all be taken down and the criminals punished. The ill gotten gains would not be kept by the crooks.

The ideology practiced by the Right has abandoned all possibility of serving the public interest, and even departed from any conversation about socially responsible corporate structures and behaviors. When they want to talk about stakeholder boards and other ways to bring integrity to their fiscal fantasies, we can talk about civil discourse with Commerce. While they insist that we play Monopoly with America and the world, there is no compromise that makes any sense.

DRC's picture
DRC
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm
I'm still trying to understand how a representative of Congress desiring to hold meetings with his constituents can be called fascism
You really don't know the definition of "fascism", do you?

Art's picture
Art
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm
Quote Elbridge:
Quote Art:

By "people", are we referring to corporations and humanoids?

By people, I am referring to any”BODY” who can help congress stimulate job growth. if you like playing the bullshit "talk to the business charter or building" that would be why Dems lost the house and with continued luck, the Senate and President also

To act as if corporate persons will help "stimulate job growth" in the US when it doesn't benefit them to do so is naive. They (corporate persons) have, over the last few decades, been the ones to convince congress that job growth in China is where their stimulation is best focused. That, my friend, is what we're trying to stop.

Only a fool would ask a rat to consider a non-cheese diet or a multi-national, slave trading corporation to give thier opinion on protectionist legislation.

The Dems lost the house because they are, largely, no better than the Republican'ts and the American people haven't figured out they are being played like a fiddle.

D_NATURED's picture
D_NATURED
Joined:
Oct. 20, 2010 8:47 pm

So, nobody can adequately prove that "fascism is here", simply because a congressman is trying to hold meetings with some CEOs. Everything you have said is based solely upon assumption, your preconceptions, and what "appears" to be so. Right.

FreeMarketeer's picture
FreeMarketeer
Joined:
Oct. 11, 2010 11:00 am

Musollini wanted to replace parliament with representives from the corporate sectors.

We've set up a system where that doesn't have to be done. Lobbyists write the legislation for the sectors they represent, Congress rubber stamps them.

The difference between overt fascism and covert fascism is a pretty fine line

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease".

polycarp2
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Currently Chatting

The GOP war on workers has killed again...

It’s time to stop the conservative's war on working people in America.

Since the birth of our nation, conservatives have always been wary of average working-class Americans having too much political or economic power. John Adams, the second President of the United States and a Federalist (precursor to today’s Republicans), was very wary of the working class, which he referred to as “the rabble.”

Powered by Pressflow, an open source content management system