CNN Coverage of Wisconsin Labor Fight

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CNN Coverage of Wisconsin Labor Fight

I got fed up with the CNN coverage of the union busting attack in Wisconsin with their talking heads refering to "union bosses" and using other negitive terms, so I posted the following on their site (probably wont do any good but at least it felt good):

I do my best to not call CNN journalists "corporate propaganda mouthpieces" so in return is it too much to ask that your on air news readers and field reporters not refer to our union members as "goons" and our democratically elected union leaders as "bosses" - The protesters in Wisconsin are not gangsters, they are teachers and firefighters, nurses, social workers and other highly skilled and dedicated hard working people who willingly take pay cuts below their education level from their first day on the job because they choose to serve the public. I'm sure your 8th grade English teacher would agree with me.

DB

DancingBear's picture
DancingBear
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Comments

CNN was attempting to make a bunch of teachers appear as thugs and gangsters?

Since when did they decide to adopt the Fox news stance?

Why does so much of the media in the USA believe the American public has a collective IQ of 50!

meljomur's picture
meljomur
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm
Quote meljomur:Since when did they decide to adopt the Fox news stance?

since the day news corp started kicking their a$$es in ratings.

i'm not sure why anyone would attempt to get useful information from any cable "news" source - unless you want to study what the absence of a fourth estate looks like.

sleeper's picture
sleeper
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

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