Teacher Unions and SAT Scores

2 posts / 0 new

Just found a really interesting posting at http://blogs.ajc.com/get-schooled-blog/2011/02/22/no-strong-teacher-unio...

There are five states in the US that make it illigal for teachers to form unions, namely South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, Texas, and Virginia. Their ACT/SAT rankings are, respectively 50th, 49th, 48th, 47th, and 44th. Does anyone else see a correlation?

The data is from a professor from Georgia Southern University named Michael More. No idea if he's related to the famous director of documentaries.

CarlMahler's picture
CarlMahler
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Comments

This just sent to me as a parent/advocate regarding California state teacher wages. It's a link to a new service provided by "Ed-Data" and the site's description follows. These folks are not millionaires by any means:

"In California’s public school system, each district negotiates a contract detailing salaries, benefits, and working conditions for its teachers through a collective bargaining process. This report provides information about teachers’ salaries and benefits and their credentials and experience. See Teachers in California for a more complete background and Negotiating Teachers’ Contracts in California for a description of how teachers’ employment contracts are determined.

Salary and benefit information in the following tables come from a teacher salary report (J-90) that districts are not required to file. About 20% (covering about 1% of the state's ADA) do not file and therefore will have no data in the Teacher Salary, Teacher Benefit, or Supplemental Salary tables."

http://www.ed-data.org/Navigation/fsTwoPanel.asp?bottom=/fiscal/teacherS...

As an added bonus, there's a Facebook page with a funny satire on teacher salaries. Type this title into facebook: "Are you sick of highly paid teachers?" posted by Meredith Menden on Friday, February 18, 2011 at 3:32pm"

Sluch
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Latest Headlines

One Iowa Caucus Delegate Comes Down To Coin Toss

The Iowa caucus convener flipped a coin. Bernie Sanders supporters called "heads" and it landed on tails.

Bernie Sanders leads Hillary Clinton by 31 points in N.H.: Poll

Sanders was at 61 percent support in the University of Massachusetts Lowell/7News poll, followed by Mrs. Clinton, at 30 percent

Martin O'Malley suspends presidential campaign after Iowa caucuses

The announcement came after O'Malley barely registered in Iowa against his better-known rivals Clinton and Sanders, failing to meet already low expectations

If You Want to Win, Go Progressive

The big question right now is whether to call Hillary Clinton a progressive, or a "moderate."

And then there's the question of who is more electable in a general election: an unabashedly progressive democrat, like Bernie Sanders; or a "centrist" democrat, like Hillary Clinton.

Powered by Drupal, an open source content management system