Why is Oregon So Progressive?

1 post / 0 new

This Wikipedia article describes some of the political milestones that took place in the 20th century. We locals are well aware that, during the earlier half of the century, Oregon was a home for the KKK and that many of Government's more memorable characterers were Conservatives. Sometime around the middle of the century, we started getting politicians like Wayne Morse, followed by Republicans like Mark Hatfield and Tom McCall. (These would be called Socialists or Communists by today's Republicans). What happened?

One thing that stuck out to me was that around the turn of the century, the State started getting landmark laws with a "populist" emphasis. Oregon was the first state, for instance, to have an intitative and referendum. That is, The people were beginning to put some strings on Government's power. Now, the word "populist" has taken on a murkey meaning. The Tea Partiers think that they are populists, and the OWS people are certainly populist. Populism cannot, at this time, be equated with "Progressivism", although, I suspect that if the liberals are able to claim the label as their own, the Tea Partiers will quickly find a way to demonize the label. This is all incidental to the main question I am asking.

How did Oregon get to be the way it is, and what does that protend for the larger picture of America?

Art's picture
Art
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Latest Headlines

Who rejected United States-North Korea peace talks?

There were conflicting reports on Sunday regarding a recent proposal for United States-North Korea peace talks which was allegedly made before North Korea"s recent nuclear test

U.K. Pound Falls As Markets Get Brexit Jitters

Bloomberg said on Monday the pound had sustained its biggest fall against the dollar in 11 months

Clinton: I'll defend Israel but push for 'two-state solution

Hillary Clinton believes both Republican candidates Donald Trump and Ted Cruz "missed the mark" with their approach to the Israel-Palestinian Arab conflict

July 4th 1776 - The First Brexit

The markets have recovered from the Brexit panic, but people are still reeling in the aftermath of the UKs vote to leave the European Union, at least in part because it seems like such an unprecedented action.

But it really isn't so unprecedented.

Powered by Pressflow, an open source content management system