Could sanctions banning the importation of oil from Iran spark a military response?

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And finally – tensions continue to rise in the Middle East as the European Union ignored threats from Iran – and passed a number of sanctions banning the importation of oil from Iran to EU nations. In response – one politician in Iran has once again called for a military blockade of the Straights of Hormuz – through which roughly 40% of the world’s oil flows through. Such a move could spark a military response from the United States and allies – creating a very dangerous situation for the entire world. This is just another consequence of our nation failing to adopt a genuine energy plan that gets us off dirty foreign crude. We need alternative energy now, before war is inevitable.

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Thom Hartmann A...
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Quote Thom Hartmann Administrator:

And finally – tensions continue to rise in the Middle East as the European Union ignored threats from Iran – and passed a number of sanctions banning the importation of oil from Iran to EU nations. In response – one politician in Iran has once again called for a military blockade of the Straights of Hormuz – through which roughly 40% of the world’s oil flows through. Such a move could spark a military response from the United States and allies – creating a very dangerous situation for the entire world. This is just another consequence of our nation failing to adopt a genuine energy plan that gets us off dirty foreign crude. We need alternative energy now, before war is inevitable.

This is how these fools we elect to make these potentially catastrophic decisions get us into wars, over and over. And then, as Chris Hedges wrote so eloquently, War is a Force that Gives US Meaning.

The Presidency is constitutionally designed to be in charge of foreign policy making, and the resident president doesn't vary much from a prescribed course, a course that we now see has evolved to become the prurient course of Empire, ever lusting for war. In many ways that's not the president's choice. The nation is an assemblage of many things that who ever is in that position has to take into account. The most powerful of those things are organized, institutionalized groupings, and the most powerful of the institutions are those that control the economy. These are a combination of public and private. Corporations are not the only "bad guys" here. Nor is the MIC. Most people today are in some way minions of those powerful groups, and taking them down means ending many things, including the all important concept, "employment". So in the end, we all are involved in the force we are calling "The Economy" (stupid).

The policy making has its own history, in this case one going back to meddling in the affairs of Iran by taking down a democratically elected government during the Eisenhower Administration and installing a U.S. puppet, the Shah, which disrupted the internal political course that might have led to a very different Iran in the position of controlling the Straits of Hormuz today. You might call this our national karma.

Had that not happened would we have a belligerent Iran today? Would Carter have done his about face on the very energy policy many are calling for and declared his Carter Doctrine, from which all this current meddling is Presidentially and Constitutionally legitimized? Would we have meddled in the affairs of Iran and Iraq in the 80's (and Afghanistan), creating another set of puppets gone awry, Saddam Husein and the Saudi radicals who became Al Qaeda?

The U.S., and the rest of the world as well, needs more than alternative energy strategy. It needs to change the very nature of what it calls "economy" and how that dominant quasi religious belief system, based now on markets instead of some other concept, a force that drives all foreign policy today, affects everyone else. The summary of it always seems to come down to War and its meaning to get people to join the cause and go along. We have not really come very far from the foreign policies of the Middle Ages. We now just get to legitimize the stupidity with our votes every so often.

.ren's picture
.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 7:50 am

In response to the question posed in your thread title, I guess the answer is 'No".

US aircraft carrier enters Gulf without incident: "A U.S. aircraft carrier sailed through the Strait of Hormuz and into the Gulf without incident on Sunday, a day after Iran backed away from an earlier threat to take action if an American carrier returned to the strategic waterway. The carrier USS Abraham Lincoln completed a 'regular and routine' passage through the strait, a critical gateway for the region's oil exports, 'as previously scheduled and without incident,' said Lieutenant Rebecca Rebarich, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Fifth Fleet."

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Calperson
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Dec. 11, 2010 10:21 am

Of course, the only reason oil is shipped around in quaint aquatic vehicles is to control the supply, and keep expenses high for oil companies, since they are, second to the armies of the world, their next biggest customers.

Any military action would be ridiculous, except to the jingoists waiting to write about it, and drumming up your shock to awesome levels.

anonymous green
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Jan. 5, 2012 11:47 am

This is phase two of Operation Iranian Liberation (OIL) formerly known as Operation Iraqi liberation (OIL) until someone the pentagon caught the abbreviation and changed it to Operation Iraqi Freedom. Another pointless war to justify over spending on the defense budget and to keep oil prices high, Halliburton has to make a buck somewhere while they not polluting the gulf of Mexico.

We can’t let the American public know we actually have too much refined oil in the form of gasoline so we are having to export it to keep domestic stock down so justify $4 a gallon gas.

I expect we will be a war with Iran no later than Dec. 21, 2012.

Recovering conservative2's picture
Recovering cons...
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Feb. 14, 2011 11:01 am

I have been reeding so much a dokter Pauls writnins, I now see the lite.

We needs to invade Iran immeediatelty. How dare they be boorn on to pmy oil.

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Phaedrus76
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