Could antibiotic-resistant diseases be the biggest threat to mankind?

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Move over climate change – Experts working with the British government have published a new study citing a “massive” increase in antibiotic resistance, which poses a tremendous risk to global health. The Chairman of the study – Professor Peter Hawkey described the rise in resistance as medicine’s equivalent of climate change.

The study points to a 30% increase in cases of a resistant strain of E. coli. Already – 25,000 people die a year in the European Union as a result of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. And in a globalized world – diseases travel across oceans with ease.

Thom Hartmann Administrator's picture
Thom Hartmann A...
Dec. 29, 2009 10:59 am


As far as I am concerned, nothing has yet dethroned Dick Cheney as biggest threat to mankind.

planetxan's picture
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

He has certainly left the biggest and ugliest footprint in our lives. There is no foreign terrorist who can hold a candle to the Darth.

DRC's picture
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

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