Daily Topics - Monday March 19th, 2012

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Catch The Thom Hartmann Program LIVE at our new time, 3-6pm Eastern!

Hour One: Privatized libraries?! Seton Motley, Less Government

Hour Two: The 1% vs the 99% - why OWS will never go away

Hour Three: The most conservative congress ever! Professor George Lakoff

shawnt56's picture
shawnt56
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Comments

Thom,

I think that you should have cut off Seton when he said "whiny little b--". I'm sick of listening to gutter talk on the radio. It's about time that people who use that language get cut out of the dialog. He also was screaming the entire time so we had to shut it off because it made me so upset and anxious. Is it possible to find right wing people who are able to speak on an even level instead of scream and who can make their case without uses obscenities? Why is it legal to use obscenities on the air? It's offensive.

dalaine's picture
dalaine
Joined:
Oct. 17, 2011 10:58 am

Thom—
What were you thinking when you paid that $210 medical billing if you didn't owe it?
First, you encouraged the insurance company to screw you further in the future by not protesting that they pay it.
Worse, you encouraged the collection company that bought the paper from the insurance company to continue this dispicable practice when you paid up because they bugged you.
You have to walk the walk if you are going to talk the talk.
While it may or may not be true in your present case, these "collection agencies" buy paper from companies with no regard as to whether the billing was even owed. I know: Qwest billed me for two months of phone service at an address I didn't live at any more after I told them I had moved. I even kept the confirmation numbers they gave me to verify it. Qwest not only didn't acknowledge my letters, they sold the company to CenturyLink, who sent the billing to a collection agency.
I wrote both and asked to see a phone log showing I ever made even one call from that address after the date I moved and informed them of that move. (I didn't get a response, of course.) The first collection agency instead sold the bill to a 2nd collection agency. I repeated my demand. Now I'm getting a letters from the 3rd collection agency for the same billing.
But here is the point, and you need to take this to heart: I WILL NEVER PAY IT. I don't owe it, and I'm through cooperating at all. It takes time, but I'm sending complaints to each Attorney General in each state involved (5 different ones, including Qwest, CenturyLink, and 3 collection agencies). I'm also sending letters to all three credit bureaus. I will make sure they spend far more money just fighting off all the repercussions from these complaints than it is worth to them.
Their threats, by the way, are hollow, and you should know that. The "collection agencies" don't have the time or resources to come after people like me for a bill under $500; it's just not feasible for them, particularly if they realize it will be a fight of any kind.
Their only recourse is to attempt to ding your credit. Even if you care about your credit rating (and many people don't anymore because it's already in the toilet), you just protest to the credit card companies and, if it is an anomoly, the credit companies remove that item from the equation.
Better yet, do what I did: Cut up all your credit cards, put your money in a credit union, and use your debit card on the rare occasions when you need a card for identification purposes. We don't need the credit card companies; they need us.
Democracy does begin with each of us, as you have said. But so does cleaning up these pyramiding collection schemes. If enough people just quit cooperating, this house of cards (which isn't that much different from the whole "derivatives" scheme) will come tumbling down.
Next time, Thom, make them prove it, or don't pay it!
Blessings,
An avid Seattle listener

ndesanta
Joined:
Mar. 19, 2012 3:00 pm

Currently Chatting

The GOP war on workers has killed again...

It’s time to stop the conservative's war on working people in America.

Since the birth of our nation, conservatives have always been wary of average working-class Americans having too much political or economic power. John Adams, the second President of the United States and a Federalist (precursor to today’s Republicans), was very wary of the working class, which he referred to as “the rabble.”

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