Corporate crimes?

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Who do you blame for corruption? The corporations, banksters and union goons who are buying our government officials? Or the government hack who is accepting the bribe?

Most in this forum will blame the first two. I emphatically blame all.

The difference is: (warning, repeat post) The goverment can kick down your door and storm your house. The government can listen in to your phone calls and monitor your email. The government can take your money at any rate they choose and you are powerless to stop them. The government can spend all of your money on lavish trips for themselves and you are stuck with the tab.The government can drag you out of your car and taze you. The government can sieze your property and give it to the highest bidder. And they do.

That said, we love to blame "The Corporations" but we rarely mention them by name. So lets try some names to go with the crimes.

1) What crimes has Apple commited and how should they be punished?

2) What crimes has Disney commited and how should they be punished?

3) What crimes has your company commited and how should you be punished?

Corporations have no power over me. If the richest CEO in the world tries to give me an order, I will give him the finger and tell him to get the hell of of my lawn. And if he does not, I will toss his ass off.

rigel1's picture
rigel1
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Comments

Rigel1,

What it boils down to is that since corporations seek a profit for their shareholders, the company will do what it takes to make that profit. There are companies, but not all companies, that do something called "externalization." This is when any organization, not just a business, absorbs the benefits of its actions unto itself and sheds the negative consequences of its actions on a different business or even unto a non-business entity like an individual person or group of people. Like I said, there are those out there who do this, but definitely not everyone.

It could involve all kinds of various pollution and other unethical practices. To me, a "good" company not only makes a profit, but also willingly and thoroughly cleans up any mess that it makes.

micahjr34
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Feb. 7, 2011 4:57 pm

Apple uses sweatshop slaves in China. All corporate officers, bondholders and shareholders should be prosecuted then hung.

Disney has bought the govt on several occasions to change copyright laws. What is the proper punishment for bribery?

BP killed 12 workers, in most states , mass killers get the executed. So the whole board, officers bondholders and shareholders should be hung.

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Phaedrus76
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Sep. 14, 2010 8:21 pm

Corporations have no power over you? They have only co-opted your life. The problem with libertarian mythology like yours is that you confuse cause and effect. Why do we have a big, bad government that is intrusive and unresponsive to the people? You say it's the fault of government hacks accepting bribes from corporate and union criminals but that fails to realize the truth of the matter which is that our government has been hijacked by rich and powerful interests and so the very reason that these special interests can get favors or get away with murder is because those hacks in public office are their guys, not ours.

You also engage in a bit of misdirection by listing a few specific corporations and, while I'm sure that a bit of digging will produce results as regards your own choices I would effortlessly counter with: Union Carbide, BP, Dupont, Exxon Mobil, Archer Daniels Midland, Louisiana-Pacific, Genetech, Pfizer, Rockwell International, Royal Caribbean, Teledyne, Northrop, General Electric, Chevron, Tyson... These and hundreds of other major corporations are convicted felons.

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mdhess
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Apr. 9, 2010 11:43 pm

By proxy, the corporations own you Rigel through our bought and paid for government. The gov't couldn't do the damage conservatives claim without a whole lot of money supplied by our overindulged private sector.

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Laborisgood
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

The corporations and the banksters run the government so they will have the government do the dirty work. Essentially they are all one in the same with the banksters holding the most power. The banksters are the top dog controlling the corporations and they in turn use the government as their muscle. All under the guise of democracy.

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Bush_Wacker
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Jun. 25, 2011 7:53 am

I notice you left Financial companies off your list. That is a significant oversight. The fuel of financial corporations and banks these days is fraud - layers and layers of fraud. That stolen money buys politicians or political office. Often the gov't 'hack' is simply an employee of one of the corporations. The money is stolen from both the industrial sector and the private sector. As for Union money, it is not significant enough to buy anything these days. There are no union 'thugs'. I am in a union, and if there were a thug, I would know. Union thugs live in the same fairy land as the homosexual agenda and Obama's Kenyan birth certificate.

I don't mind having discussions with you rigel1. I enjoy the challenge, the input and the exchange. But please try to keep one foot in reality.

BTW, I don't like my union leadership, they are bordering on corrupt, but they have zero influence in national politics. Zero.

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planetxan
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm
Quote planetxan:

I notice you left Financial companies off your list. That is a significant oversight. The fuel of financial corporations and banks these days is fraud - layers and layers of fraud. That stolen money buys politicians or political office. Often the gov't 'hack' is simply an employee of one of the corporations. The money is stolen from both the industrial sector and the private sector. As for Union money, it is not significant enough to buy anything these days. There are no union 'thugs'. I am in a union, and if there were a thug, I would know. Union thugs live in the same fairy land as the homosexual agenda and Obama's Kenyan birth certificate.

I don't mind having discussions with you rigel1. I enjoy the challenge, the input and the exchange. But please try to keep one foot in reality.

BTW, I don't like my union leadership, they are bordering on corrupt, but they have zero influence in national politics. Zero.

I did not leave financial companies of the list. Isn't that what we call "Banksters"? You must have missed that one. I don't know what union you are in, but most unions contribute heavily to political campaigns.

Both feet firmly planted in reality.

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rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 7:49 am
Quote Phaedrus76:Apple uses sweatshop slaves in China. All corporate officers, bondholders and shareholders should be prosecuted then hung. Disney has bought the govt on several occasions to change copyright laws. What is the proper punishment for bribery? BP killed 12 workers, in most states , mass killers get the executed. So the whole board, officers bondholders and shareholders should be hung.

Good answer.

I totally agree with you on the China thing.

As far as Disney is concerned. You just admitted that the government is corrupt. Who did Disney bribe? If there is a charge of bribery, the first thing we need to do is to find the government officials who accepted the money. Are they somehow better than Disney? Your example illustrates my point perfectly. This is why I trust neither. At least with Disney and Apple, I can choose to opt out. I don't have to purchase their products. With government, the more power you give them the less control we have over their corruption and our lives.

Finally BP. Accidents happen. Is there any evidence that they purposely killed anyone? Did they violate any safety regulations? Has there been any real evidence presented to show that corners were cut in the name of profits? And if they were, did every high ranking person in the company agree to it as you claim? Why the Hell would BP want to burn down one of their oil rigs? makes no sense. If what you alledge is true, then why would the government be letting them off the hook? Have the feds been bought yet again?

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rigel1
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Rigel1,

You make an excellent point. It does not make sense to punish businesses for bribery, blackmail, etc. when the government does "stuff" like that anyways. Just look at the activities of the CIA!!!!!

The CIA has bribed people, has blackmailed people, has murdered people. If a private business of any kind has done stuff like that, people in this nation would be howling mad! It is hypocritical, because if businesses had done things like the CIA does things, there could be all kinds of people put in prison for corporate espionage and sabotage!

Rigel1, I do believe in government oversight of businesses, to stop anti-competitive practices and to protect consumers from greedy businesses that put profits first and public safety second. However, you do have a point in that it is hypocrisy to talk about oversight of businesses when government agencies like ther CIA get away with garbage everyday, both literally and figuratively. Just look at the "school of the America's" where the USA government has offered training to operatives or certain other governments that have used it to commit horrendous atrocities!

micahjr34
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Feb. 7, 2011 4:57 pm

Choosing to opt out isn't good enough. That's the whole point. You can't demonize the government and look the other way from the corporations. It takes two parties for there to be corruption. That's like saying if a man hires someone to kill his wife then the killer is the only one who should be punished. After all it was only his choice whether to go through with it.

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Bush_Wacker
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Jun. 25, 2011 7:53 am

What most laws actually do say is what the most powerful among you have as their vested interest.,our laws reflect where the power is i,e smoking is legal (tobacco plant)cannabis(HEMP PLANT) is illegal this is the same with health care, mass produced electric cars and using solar power and solar heat in every home ,this list could go on.

Our society has to be dragged ,kicking and screaming,to consider the common good.Whenever common good or collective good is mentioned ,everyone yells communism.In our society,if providing for the good of the many does not produce a huge profit for someone,the good of the many is more often than not ignored.

The basic question facing human kind is can self interest ever be replaced by the best interest ,the common interest,of humanKIND.

Will power is what would work seeing another,s plight as our own.

Our entire planet faces a crises of consciousness,we must decide to care for each other that is the only solution.We must construct a new model and eliminate all separations between us this is what all evolving civilizations eventually do ,its the only way for species survival.Humans must understand we are one family.

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humanitys team
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Dec. 24, 2010 4:53 am
Quote rigel1:

Accidents happen.

Know much law?

chilidog
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm
Quote micahjr34:

Rigel1,

You make an excellent point. It does not make sense to punish businesses for bribery, blackmail, etc. when the government does "stuff" like that anyways. Just look at the activities of the CIA!!!!!

The CIA has bribed people, has blackmailed people, has murdered people. If a private business of any kind has done stuff like that, people in this nation would be howling mad! It is hypocritical, because if businesses had done things like the CIA does things, there could be all kinds of people put in prison for corporate espionage and sabotage!

Rigel1, I do believe in government oversight of businesses, to stop anti-competitive practices and to protect consumers from greedy businesses that put profits first and public safety second. However, you do have a point in that it is hypocrisy to talk about oversight of businesses when government agencies like ther CIA get away with garbage everyday, both literally and figuratively. Just look at the "school of the America's" where the USA government has offered training to operatives or certain other governments that have used it to commit horrendous atrocities!

Can you think of any other government corruption outside of national defense? That's not really thinking outside of the box for a liberal is it? Any others?

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rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 7:49 am
Quote Bush_Wacker:

Choosing to opt out isn't good enough. That's the whole point. You can't demonize the government and look the other way from the corporations. It takes two parties for there to be corruption. That's like saying if a man hires someone to kill his wife then the killer is the only one who should be punished. After all it was only his choice whether to go through with it.

Remember this statement?

Who do you blame for corruption? The corporations, banksters and union goons who are buying our government officials? Or the government hack who is accepting the bribe?

Most in this forum will blame the first two. I emphatically blame all.

I see absolutely zero expectations for government responsibility in this forum. Why is that? You have it exactly backwards. You are asking one corrupt organization to police another corrupt organization.

Why do you think that people in goverment are morally superior to those of us who are not? Are you that naive?

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rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 7:49 am
Quote chilidog:
Quote rigel1:

Accidents happen.

Know much law?

Yes.

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rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 7:49 am

Let's see, the question was can I think of anything devious that a corporation has done along the lines of the examples given? Hmm, thinking . . . something has to be out there . . . hmm, oh yes:

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505245_162-57417203/developments-in-british-phone-hacking-scandal/

April 19, 2012 4:11 PMDevelopments in British phone-hacking scandalDevelopments in a phone-hacking scandal involving British newspapers owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp.:

November 2005: News of the World royal reporter Clive Goodman writes story saying Prince William has a knee injury. Buckingham Palace complaint prompts police inquiry.

August 2006: Goodman arrested along with private investigator Glenn Mulcaire for suspected hacking into voicemails of royal officials.

January 2007: Goodman jailed for four months; Mulcaire given six-month sentence. News of the World editor Andy Coulson resigns but insists he had not known about the hacking.

May 2007: Conservative Party leader David Cameron taps Coulson to be his media adviser.

July 2009: Coulson tells parliamentary committee he never "condoned use of phone hacking."

September 2009: Rebekah Brooks, former editor of the News of the World and its sister paper The Sun, named chief executive of News International, News Corp.'s British arm.

February 2010: Parliamentary committee finds no evidence that Coulson knew about phone hacking but states it's "inconceivable" that no one apart from royal correspondent Goodman knew about it.

May 2010: Cameron becomes prime minister; Coulson named communications chief.

Jan. 14, 2011: British police reopen investigation into phone-hacking charges against News of the World.

Jan. 21: Coulson resigns from Cameron's office amid claims he had sanctioned phone hacking. Coulson continues to deny any wrongdoing or any knowledge of hacking.

April 5: Police arrest two journalists, including Ian Edmondson, the tabloid's former news editor, on suspicion of intercepting voicemails. More than a dozen arrests of journalists and some police would follow in the coming months as inquiries into phone hacking and police corruption continued.

April 8: News of the World admits it was responsible for phone hacking and says it will set up a compensation plan to deal with claims fairly and efficiently. It was the newspaper's first admission of liability.

April 15: Judge allows actress Sienna Miller and three others to proceed with lawsuits over phone hacking against the newspaper despite an ongoing criminal investigation.

May 13: Miller's lawyer says lawsuit settled for 100,000 pounds (about $165,000 at the time). Since then, News International has reached settlements with several others to avoid trials.

June 30: British regulators give News Corp. tentative approval to take full control of satellite broadcaster British Sky Broadcasting.

July 4: The Guardian newspaper reports that News of the World journalists hacked into voicemails left for murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler, and gave her parents and police false hope she was alive by deleting messages when the mailbox became full.

July 6: Cameron demands inquiries after the Guardian report.

July 7: News International shuts down the best-selling News of the World tabloid.

July 8: Coulson and two other men are arrested in the widening police inquiry.

July 10: News of the World publishes its last edition after 168 years.

July 11: News Corp. withdraws offer to spin off Sky News in attempt to save bid for complete control of satellite broadcaster BSkyB. British media report that two other News Corp. newspapers in Britain engaged in hacking, deception and privacy violations that included accessing former Prime Minister Gordon Brown's bank account information and stealing the medical records of his seriously ill baby son.

July 13: News Corp. pulls its bid to take full control of BSkyB.

July 14: Murdoch agrees to appear before a parliamentary committee, defends News Corp.'s handling of scandal. Reports emerge that FBI opens inquiry into possible phone hacking of 9/11 terror victims.

July 15: Resignations of Rebekah Brooks, the chief of News Corp.'s British operations, and Les Hinton, publisher of The Wall Street Journal's publisher and one of Murdoch's staunchest allies. Hinton was chairman of News International during some of the time phone hacking took place. Murdoch meets with Milly Dowler's family to apologize.

July 16: News Corp. runs a full-page ad in seven British newspapers apologizing for "serious wrongdoing" at the News of the World.

July 17: Brooks is arrested by U.K. police in the hacking scandal. London police chief Paul Stephenson resigns amid criticism over his alleged links to Neil Wallis, a former News of the World executive editor arrested in the scandal. Murdoch publishes another ad in British newspapers titled "Putting right what's gone wrong."

July 18: London police assistant commissioner John Yates resigns. He made the decision two years earlier not reopen police inquiry into phone hacking — a decision he said he would have made differently with the benefit of hindsight.

July 19: Rupert Murdoch appears at a parliamentary hearing alongside his son James and says he was humbled and ashamed, but accepted no responsibility for wrongdoing. James Murdoch, executive chairman of the British newspaper unit, apologizes for the scandal. He tells British lawmakers that "these actions do not live up to the standards our company aspires to," but he denies he knew hacking was widespread at News of the World.

July 21: James Murdoch's former legal adviser and a former editor contest his testimony to British lawmakers.

Aug. 16: British lawmakers release written testimony in which lawyers and former executives cast additional doubt on the denials made by Coulson and by Rupert and James Murdoch. Former Murdoch lieutenants accuse the pair of misrepresentations and exaggerations.

Aug. 24: U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder calls a report of possible phone hacking targeting 9/11 victims and their families very disturbing and says the department is pursuing a preliminary criminal investigation of the matter.

Sept. 2: Long-time independent board member Thomas Perkins announces he is leaving News Corp.'s board of directors, but he cites his upcoming 80th birthday and not the scandal.

Sept. 6: Four former News International executives challenge statements made to Parliament by Rupert and James Murdoch. One says Rupert Murdoch wrongly blamed outside lawyers for improperly investigating his company's phone hacking scandal.

Oct. 21: Rupert Murdoch faces disgruntled investors at the company's annual shareholders meeting. He defends his handling of the scandal and deflects any notion that he plans to step down soon.

Oct. 24: News Corp. discloses that more than a third of the ballots cast oppose the re-election of Rupert Murdoch's sons James and Lachlan to the company's board of directors.

Nov. 1: Documents show a legal adviser to the company's newspapers warned three years earlier that there was overwhelming evidence that several senior journalists at the News of the World were using illegal methods. The documents bolster claims that high-ranking executives were aware that phone hacking was more widespread than they let on.

Nov. 10: James Murdoch returns to Parliament. He insists he hadn't been told of widespread phone hacking and blames two of his senior lieutenants for failing to warn him of a culture of criminality.

Nov. 14: Opening of a media-ethics inquiry set up by Britain's prime minister. The two-part inquiry was tasked with investigating the role of the press and police in the phone-hacking scandal.

Nov. 24: Miller, the actress, tells the media-ethics inquiry that she was left paranoid and scared by years of relentless tabloid pursuit that ranged from paparazzi outside her house to the hacking of her mobile phone.

Nov. 29 James Murdoch re-elected chairman of BSkyB.

Jan. 9, 2012: News Corp. names Gerson Zweifach as its group general counsel, replacing Janet Nova, who had been serving in an interim basis for the past six months.

Jan. 19: It's revealed that News International agreed to cash payouts to 37 people, including movie star Jude Law, who were harassed and phone-hacked by his tabloid press. Financial details of 15 of the payouts, totaling more than 640,000 pounds (about $1 million), are made public at a court hearing.

Jan 27: GlaxoSmithKline says that James Murdoch has decided not to seek re-election to the drug company's board so he could focus on his duties at News Corp.

Feb. 2: Lex Fenwick, a Bloomberg LP executive, is named Hinton's replacement as CEO of Dow Jones & Co., the News Corp. subsidiary that publishes The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires.

Feb. 8: News Corp. says net income grew by nearly two-thirds in the final three months of 2011, despite expenses related to ongoing phone hacking investigations of its U.K. newspaper unit.

Feb. 17: Following the arrests of several reporters at his other title, The Sun, Rupert Murdoch warns staff at The Sun that he won't protect reporters found to have broken the law, but he pledges unstinting support to the title he claimed is among his proudest achievements.

Feb. 22: The lawyer for the wife of former Prime Minister Tony Blair says she is suing over phone hacking.

Feb. 26: The Sun launches a Sunday edition with a familiar mix of celebrity news, scantily clad women and defiant language in place of the News of the World. The next day, Rupert Murdoch tweets that the edition sold 3.26 million copies.

Feb. 29: James Murdoch steps down as executive chairman of News International. News Corp. says Murdoch will remain its deputy chief operating officer and concentrate on expanding its television business.

March 5: Reports emerge that the FBI is investigating whether a Russian billboard company once owned by News Corp. bribed local officials to get sign placements approved. The investigation grew out of Britain's phone-hacking scandal.

March 8: Britain's Press Complaints Commission, an industry-funded regulatory body that has been called weak and ineffective by victims of the scandal, confirms it is to be abolished and replaced with a new agency.

March 9: Britain's communications regulator says it's monitoring the case to be sure that BSkyB is a fit and proper holder of a broadcasting license.

March 14: In a letter to British parliamentarians investigating the scandal, James Murdoch reiterates that he didn't know the extent of the illegal behavior, but he says "it would have been better if I had asked more questions."

April 3: James Murdoch steps down as BSkyB chairman, remains on board.

April 10: A blogger publishes what he says were more than 1,000 recorded transactions between journalists and a private investigator who was convicted of trading in illegally obtained information. The journalists included those at News Corp.

April 12: The U.K.'s police watchdog says senior members of Scotland Yard showed poor judgment in their handling of the scandal. It says senior officers in the London police force broke the rules when they hired Wallis, a former tabloid executive, to help run public relations and helped Wallis's daughter get a job.

Wednesday: Britain's chief prosecutor says criminal charges are being considered against four reporters, one police officer and six others in four cases related to investigations into tabloid phone hacking and other alleged misconduct.

Thursday: Britain's media ethics inquiry says it will hear testimony from Rupert and James Murdoch next week. Officers arrest three people in the investigation of corrupt ties between the British police and the press.

Choco's picture
Choco
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm
Quote rigel1:
Quote Bush_Wacker:

Choosing to opt out isn't good enough. That's the whole point. You can't demonize the government and look the other way from the corporations. It takes two parties for there to be corruption. That's like saying if a man hires someone to kill his wife then the killer is the only one who should be punished. After all it was only his choice whether to go through with it.

Remember this statement?

Who do you blame for corruption? The corporations, banksters and union goons who are buying our government officials? Or the government hack who is accepting the bribe?

Most in this forum will blame the first two. I emphatically blame all.

I see absolutely zero expectations for government responsibility in this forum. Why is that? You have it exactly backwards. You are asking one corrupt organization to police another corrupt organization.

Why do you think that people in goverment are morally superior to those of us who are not? Are you that naive?

Wow, you totally misread what I wrote. They are all to be held accountable. That is what I said, not you. You said you "blame" them all but you have nothing to fear from anyone except the government. You want to put the "ultimate blame" on the government and leave the champions of free market alone. You are in the position of blaming the gun instead of blaming the guy pulling the trigger. That's kind of an about face for you isn't it.

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Bush_Wacker
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Jun. 25, 2011 7:53 am

Probably when a corporation is found guilty of wrong-doing, the CEO responsible for the corporation's decisions should be the one going to jail or paying the fine.

A dead corporate charter sitting in a safe can't do anything on its own, can it? Blaming and fining the dead charter ...a piece of paper... for wrong doing is rather stupid.

Whenever any society encourages large disparities in wealth, wealth ultimately captures government either through hired force or corruption. When in history has that not been so?

The only time that doesn't occur is in egalitarian societies. The Iroquois Confederation comes to mind..If our democracy lasts as long as theirs did, we'll be doing well.

Complaining about corruption without tackeling the roots of corruption is an excercise in futility.

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

polycarp2
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm
Quote rigel1:
Quote Phaedrus76:Apple uses sweatshop slaves in China. All corporate officers, bondholders and shareholders should be prosecuted then hung. Disney has bought the govt on several occasions to change copyright laws. What is the proper punishment for bribery? BP killed 12 workers, in most states , mass killers get the executed. So the whole board, officers bondholders and shareholders should be hung.

Good answer.

I totally agree with you on the China thing.

As far as Disney is concerned. You just admitted that the government is corrupt. Who did Disney bribe? If there is a charge of bribery, the first thing we need to do is to find the government officials who accepted the money. Are they somehow better than Disney? Your example illustrates my point perfectly. This is why I trust neither. At least with Disney and Apple, I can choose to opt out. I don't have to purchase their products. With government, the more power you give them the less control we have over their corruption and our lives.

Finally BP. Accidents happen. Is there any evidence that they purposely killed anyone? Did they violate any safety regulations? Has there been any real evidence presented to show that corners were cut in the name of profits? And if they were, did every high ranking person in the company agree to it as you claim? Why the Hell would BP want to burn down one of their oil rigs? makes no sense. If what you alledge is true, then why would the government be letting them off the hook? Have the feds been bought yet again?

On Disney, the bribes are legal PAC contributions, but I'd say change the law, outlaw PACs and SuperPACs.

ON BP, immediately after it occurred, the engineers from Halliburton made it clear that they did everything they could to get BP and Deepwater to change/ improve the blowout preventer, which would have cost an extra 1 day, and about $200,000.00. And are you saying that the strong leaders at the top of BP are actually completely ignorant of their operations? That they aren't competent managers, earning their keep?

Phaedrus76's picture
Phaedrus76
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Sep. 14, 2010 8:21 pm
Quote Laborisgood:

By proxy, the corporations own you Rigel through our bought and paid for government.

Who did they buy the government from? The tooth fairy?

rigel1's picture
rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 7:49 am
Quote Phaedrus76:
Quote rigel1:
Quote Phaedrus76:Apple uses sweatshop slaves in China. All corporate officers, bondholders and shareholders should be prosecuted then hung. Disney has bought the govt on several occasions to change copyright laws. What is the proper punishment for bribery? BP killed 12 workers, in most states , mass killers get the executed. So the whole board, officers bondholders and shareholders should be hung.

Good answer.

I totally agree with you on the China thing.

As far as Disney is concerned. You just admitted that the government is corrupt. Who did Disney bribe? If there is a charge of bribery, the first thing we need to do is to find the government officials who accepted the money. Are they somehow better than Disney? Your example illustrates my point perfectly. This is why I trust neither. At least with Disney and Apple, I can choose to opt out. I don't have to purchase their products. With government, the more power you give them the less control we have over their corruption and our lives.

Finally BP. Accidents happen. Is there any evidence that they purposely killed anyone? Did they violate any safety regulations? Has there been any real evidence presented to show that corners were cut in the name of profits? And if they were, did every high ranking person in the company agree to it as you claim? Why the Hell would BP want to burn down one of their oil rigs? makes no sense. If what you alledge is true, then why would the government be letting them off the hook? Have the feds been bought yet again?

On Disney, the bribes are legal PAC contributions, but I'd say change the law, outlaw PACs and SuperPACs.

ON BP, immediately after it occurred, the engineers from Halliburton made it clear that they did everything they could to get BP and Deepwater to change/ improve the blowout preventer, which would have cost an extra 1 day, and about $200,000.00. And are you saying that the strong leaders at the top of BP are actually completely ignorant of their operations? That they aren't competent managers, earning their keep?

If that is the case and they did risk lives, the people who made the decision to procede with an unsafe operation should be charged. But not every senior manager is involved in oil drilling safety. So you can't send everyone to jail. If there was a crime, why is the Obama adminstration dragging it's feet?

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rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 7:49 am

Rigel wrote: If that is the case and they did risk lives, the people who made the decision to procede with an unsafe operation should be charged. But not every senior manager is involved in oil drilling safety. So you can't send everyone to jail. If there was a crime, why is the Obama adminstration dragging it's feet?

:poly replies: Probably because there is one justice system for the top tiers, and another for everyone else. Don't you read even media news? It's pretty easy to discern that.

A neighbor of mine was charged with stealing a $35 axe...charged as a felony misdemeanor.. (He didn't do it. His so-called friends he was hanging with pointed the finger at him. to avoid being charged themselves).

He was given "Diversion" rather than jail time.

Diversion for two years includes paying over $1,000 a year for Admin. fees to oversee him, He was required to obtain services of private firms for Anger Management, another for Stress Management, another for Budget Management, another for Ethics, another for Alcohol Abuse (he doesn't drink) and twice-a-week drug testing at a tidy sum per week..

The justice system is a pretty good scam to rake in the money by private firms who lobbyed for their own particular cut of the justice pie. Welcome to market-based Colorado. If Colo. can figure out a way for private business to profit from executions we'll put Texas to shame.

.Probably the private prisons are licking their chops...hoping that many under the programs won't be able to pay the fees in this jobless economy. and undoubtably, many won't. Buy prison stock

However, those who commit the bigger crimes have a corporate scapegoat to take the fall...They get off Scott Free

We have two justice systems. One serves to enrich private businesses set up to profit from it, The other justice system protects corporate bigwigs by bringing charges against a dead piece of paper (corporate charter) sitting in a safe when the top execs commit wrong-doing in the name of the corporation.

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

polycarp2
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