Governor Rich Scott creates a "task force" to look into Florida’s “Shoot First” law

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Today, Florida Governor Rich Scott will name members of a task force responsible for looking into Florida’s “Shoot First” law – following national outrage over the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin and the mishandled investigation that followed. As Governor Scott said last month, "After listening to many concerned citizens in recent days, I will call for a Task Force on Citizen Safety and Protection to investigate how to make sure a tragedy such as this does not occur in the future."

Unclear if this is a PR stunt by the radical right-wing Governor or an honest effort to assess the risks associated with shoot first laws. But if it is an honest effort – then he doesn’t have to look much farther than the numbers. In 2004 – the year before the Shoot First law was signed by then Governor Jeb Bush in Florida – there were 31 so-called justifiable homicides in the state.

But by 2009 – four years after the law was signed – the number of so-called justifiable homicide had spiked to 105. It’s pretty clear – Shoot First laws don’t make us safer – they just give cover to the trigger-happy and paranoid among us. Oh – and they also give legal cover to corporate gun sellers like Wal Mart.

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Thom Hartmann A...
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How many of those justifable homicides weren't ? Just because the number has risen proves nothing. A person has a right to defend themselves and their homes and their loved ones. And how many crimes have not been commited by the people who were killed by these justifiable homicides. If the United States was attacked by another country would you wait for someone else to save you or would you be willing to take up arms against the aggressor? I know what I would chose. If I am going to die I might as well die fighting.

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