Americans Pay More In Taxes Than Food, Rent, Clothes

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http://jan.ocregister.com/2012/05/15/americans-pay-more-for-taxes-than-food-rent-clothes/79135/

This is a curious statistic. I wonder what the proportion is in truly Socialist countries like Sweden. If its close, then we are not getting much bang for our govt buck. Of course, those other countries aren't trying to be policeman to the world with a big military.

lovecraft
Joined:
May. 8, 2012 12:06 pm

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Does this pass the smell test?

Unfortunately, the link to the Tax Foundation in the OCRegister article, does not work. And I can't find it on their website either.

chilidog
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

The foundation said it was comparing what Americans spend on essentials vs. what they spend for government. The gap between the two has actually shrunk in recent years.

It peaked in 2000, when Americans gave 19% more to the government than they spent on these items. The growth in tax

collections was slowed because of the collapse of the “dot-com bubble” in 2001 and the financial crisis and recession in 2007-2009, according to National Bureau of Economic Research data.

However, the government is picking up a bigger portion of the tab for housing, food, clothing, healthcare and transportation through government social benefits such as Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

“For instance, in 1929, transfer payments represented only 0.5% of private expenditures on housing, food, clothing, healthcare, and transportation. By 1965, when Medicare began, this percentage had grown to about 11%. Today it stands at close to 35%, said the Tax Foundation.

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douglaslee
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

That's from the OCRegister Article citing the Tax Foundation. But you can't get the original Tax Foundation article.

I suppose when you average me and Bill Gates, yeah, we're paying more for taxes than food, shelter, and clothing.

chilidog
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

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