David From: Article written "Fear fueling Republican extremism"

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Last month, two political scientists published one of those rare op-eds that gets the political community talking.

The thesis of the piece was contained in the title: "Let's just say it: The Republicans are the problem."

FULL article here:

http://www.cnn.com/2012/05/14/opinion/frum-mann-ornstein/index.html?eref...

Thome should discuss this on his show

partyof5's picture
partyof5
Joined:
Apr. 6, 2010 9:24 am

Comments

Great article. "When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the country's challenges."

Phaedrus76's picture
Phaedrus76
Joined:
Sep. 14, 2010 7:21 pm

From the article:

Because Senate rules often require unanimous consent to move to the next order of business, a determined minority can force delay on almost any action it opposes.

Translation... if we had a MORE democratic Senate, a handful of far Right psychopaths could not hold the nation hostage.

At SOME point Dems have to realize that it's the anti-democratic elements of our federal system that gives the Right power it might never hold in a democracy. The Right got it's foot in the door when the EC threw the election to Bush, a canidate REJECTED by the People and they built upon that power ever since.

Pierpont's picture
Pierpont
Joined:
Feb. 29, 2012 1:19 pm

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