The DSM: Psychiatry's Deadliest Scam

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The DSM: Psychiatry's Deadliest Scam

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PcuhhJ1BaMk

antikakistocrat's picture
antikakistocrat
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Apr. 18, 2012 3:41 pm

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Thanks for the link. I can't wait to watch this one.

Why is psychology even allowed in court?

spicoli's picture
spicoli
Joined:
Jun. 4, 2010 12:12 pm

The problem is that you don't know enough about the subject matter to make a broad, sweeping statement about it. Unless you went to medical school and are some kind of disgruntled or renigade psychiatrist, I disagree. It seems like having read something on the Interment somewhere makes everyone an expert these days.

Robindell's picture
Robindell
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Because many of our laws are couched in terms of sanity and rational morality, psychology at its best observational operation can help disabuse those using "law" of its moral clarity. When used with modesty and moral respect for its ability to be part of civilization, the law is a very good thing. When taken as a valid observation rather than ultimate science, psychiatric insight can lead us toward moral realism and compassion. This is good.

drc2
Joined:
Apr. 26, 2012 12:15 pm
Quote Robindell:

The problem is that you don't know enough about the subject matter to make a broad, sweeping statement about it. Unless you went to medical school and are some kind of disgruntled or renigade psychiatrist, I disagree. It seems like having read something on the Interment somewhere makes everyone an expert these days.

Were you referring to my post? It wasn't a statement, it was a question. Then you assume I read something on the internet to come to some sort of conclusion. I was just asking a question.

Quote drc2:

Because many of our laws are couched in terms of sanity and rational morality, psychology at its best observational operation can help disabuse those using "law" of its moral clarity. When used with modesty and moral respect for its ability to be part of civilization, the law is a very good thing. When taken as a valid observation rather than ultimate science, psychiatric insight can lead us toward moral realism and compassion. This is good.

That makes sense and is more on the lines on what I was looking for.

spicoli's picture
spicoli
Joined:
Jun. 4, 2010 12:12 pm
Quote antikakistocrat:

The DSM: Psychiatry's Deadliest Scam

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PcuhhJ1BaMk

To call it a scam is a bit ridiculous. Most of it is based on peer reviewed research and helps millions of suffers.

However, there are side effects to most drugs so they should be used with caution, as a last resort. I think a lot people take these drugs without fully appreciating their risks.

Dr. Econ's picture
Dr. Econ
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

I agree with Dr. Econ. After all, he is a doctor.

Psychiatry is not an exact science. When you have a tragic or at least desperate situation involving an individual's mental well-being, and it ends up in the courts, there has to be some procedure to determine if someone is at least capable of understanding the charges against him. If not, he or she would not be receiving a fair trial. What has to be said is that you have people who kill others who, if they are first-time offenders, receive a reduced sentence, while others who are insane may be locked up for the rest of their lives. Someone who is mentally ill would likely have a difficult time researching the law and advocating for oneself. Even if a lawyer is appointed or is willing to help, the person may or may not be able to communicate rationally.

Research that is well-regarded and largely accepted has found that mentally ill people actually have a lower rate of committing murders than does the general population. As PBS Frontline has reported, many seriously mentally ill people end up in prison, including state penitentiatries. More often than not, their offenses are relatively minor. That is why in some jurisdictions, there are specialized mental health courts. In many states such as Ohio, Illinois, and California, prisons have become the largest mental health providers. In Minneaplis, the Hennepin County Hospital is the only one that I know of that has two emergency departments, a regular emergency room, and a psychiatric emergency room, only for psychiatric cases. Mental illness often involves the breakdown of a person's ability to function. For that reason, it is a complex area that cannot be taken lightly. My concern is that ignorant, bigoted Republicans will further cut the funding for vital programs that allow people to live in the community and survive.

As it is, Democratic Mayor Rahm Emanuel in conjunction with the Chicago City Council closed several mental health clinics that were owned and operated by the city. Chicago's financial deficit along with Illinois's brought this about. Protesters chained themselves to one of the clilnics before it closed and had to be removed by police. At the Nato Summit protests, some of the demonstrators had signs which referred to the closing of the city's mental health centers. Previously, protesters in Chicago interrupted a neighborhood meeting by an alderman who is considered a good guy by many, but who voted in favor of the closing of the clinics. They were later interviewed on the radio and said that clients of the facility in their ward, because of their condition, would not be able to travel a long distance via public transportation to receive treatments at a distant, unfamiliar location in the city. The city's plan to provide treatment elsewhere was not viable, they said. The alderman was also interviewed and said that he didn't see any other choice but to save money by consolidating the services, given Chicago's massive budget imbalance.

Illilnois and California, both of which have Democratic governers and I think Democrats in the majority in their general assemblies, are cutting Medicaid, which is relied upon by many disabled people, including those with mental illness, to pay for ongoing treatment and health care services. Mentally ill people often are in need of case management to make sure that they are following up with treatment and to help them participate in other services or activities and to check on their mental state. Without these services, their ability to function would deteriorate. Even when professional help is available and is accepted, patients may only improve to a limited degree. Cutting them off from all services would be deterimental and unethical.

Robindell's picture
Robindell
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

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