Chemical Industry Lobbyists Sneak Amendment into Farm Bill to Allow Unlimited Toxic Pesticide Contamination of Surface Waters

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The pesticide industry has launched a sneak attack on water quality by attaching a toxic pesticide amendment to the unrelated Senate farm bill. The pesticide lobby wants to rewrite the Clean Water Act by pushing what's known as the "Hagan amendment" to allow unregulated pesticide applications directly into U.S. waterways. Attaching this provision to the unrelated agriculture legislation creates controversy and bogs down the farm bill.
Source: http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/press_releases/2012/pesticides-06-14-2012.html . . ( Center for Biological Diversity WASHINGTON June 15, 2012 )
"We can't sacrifice human health and the environment to pesticide-industry profits," said Bill Snape, senior counsel at the Center for Biological Diversity. "The Clean Water Act can help stem the toxic tide of pesticides in our waters, and it's wrong for special interests to interfere with that protection."

Clean Water Act regulations require a simple, routine permit for those applying pesticides to waterways — both to ensure the uses are reported to the EPA and to help limit chemical exposure for impaired waterways and sensitive wildlife. The permits carry a minimal burden while protecting human health and the environment from toxics.

Two billion pounds of pesticides are sold each year for use in the United States, with long-term persistence that hurts both wildlife and humans. The U.S. Geological Survey found that more than 90 percent of U.S. waters and fish tested across the country are contaminated with pesticides; the result is a major loss of fishes, amphibians and birds. Pesticides are disastrous for endangered aquatic species already facing extinction.

"The Clean Water Act has been working for more than 30 years to protect our waterways and wildlife," said Snape. "Industry's poison pill has to be rejected."

Many approved pesticides are linked to higher cancer rates, hormone disruption and other human-health problems. Pesticides are a major source of occupational injury and illness for farm workers, and new research indicates that the effects can cascade down to offspring, hurting future generations as well. Reducing pesticide use in waterways will help prevent these impacts.

EPA's simple permitting process has minimal impacts on family farmers; these permits do not apply to land-based pesticide applications, and the cost of a permit is minuscule when compared to the benefits of protecting water quality, wildlife and health.

The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 375,000 members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.

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Sacramento Dave
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Amendment would eliminate duplicative permitting
Thu, 2012-06-14 22:37
The NCC

The National Cotton Council expressed its gratitude to North Carolina Sen. Kay Hagan on Thursday for her submission of an amendment to the 2012 farm bill that would reduce the regulatory burden on producers and reaffirm the primacy of the Federal Insecticide Rodenticide and Act (FIFRA) in regulating pesticide applications, including those over and near bodies of water.

The amendment includes the language of H.R. 872, which was passed by the House in March 2011 and was approved by the Senate Agriculture Committee.

The letter from NCC President/CEO Mark Lange thanked her for her leadership and stated that U.S. cotton’s central organization strongly supports her amendment and looks forward to working with her to ensure its adoption on the Senate floor.

The letter noted that the requirement for producers to obtain a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for certain pesticide applications, as mandated under National Cotton Council v. EPA, adds unnecessary, duplicative and costly requirements for farms already operating on the margins and which are already in compliance with FIFRA pesticide use restrictions. Since the inception of the Clean Water Act (CWA) in 1972, water quality concerns from pesticide applications have been addressed during the registration and labeling process under FIFRA.

“Pesticides must undergo a minimum of 125 safety tests -- including impacts to aquatic environments -- before they receive a registration for use,” Lange said. “Permitting under the CWA is duplicative regulation which will burden applicators with high costs and liability without providing additional environmental protection.”

The letter said EPA estimates that NPDES permit requirements will affect about 365,000 pesticide applicators nationwide that perform 5.6 million applications annually. Further, EPA estimates it will cost $50 million and require more than a million hours per year to implement. Industry cost estimates are much higher. The permit’s complex compliance requirements will impose additional burdens on thousands of small businesses, communities, counties, and state and federal agencies legally responsible for pest control, and expose them to liability through citizen suit provisions in the CWA.

Source URL: http://deltafarmpress.com/government/amendment-would-eliminate-duplicati...

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stwo
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Since the inception of the Clean Water Act (CWA) in 1972, water quality concerns from pesticide applications have been addressed during the registration and labeling process under FIFRA.

“Pesticides must undergo a minimum of 125 safety tests -- including impacts to aquatic environments -- before they receive a registration for use,” Lange said. “Permitting under the CWA is duplicative regulation which will burden applicators with high costs and liability without providing additional environmental protection.”

Here is how I read that. The cotton farmers don't feel that they need to let anyone know when, where and what they are spraying since the actual pesticides water quality concerns were done during the registration and labeling of the product/chemical before they bought it. In my opinion, that doesn't mean that they are going to read the label and follow the directions.

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MrsBJLee
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Feb. 17, 2012 9:45 am

I would assume that if ALUMINUM and BARIUM were to go into a water source... I don't know... the size of LAKE MICHIGAN from a man made fake cloud that was formed through the use of a CHEMTRAIL... than it's OK.

Because I live 5 minutes from Lake Michigan and that's precisely what happens when it rains.

But since CHEMTRAILS appear to be part of the United Nation's AGENDA 21 progam... no one is allowed to talk about it.

CHEMTRAILS...

AGENDA 21...

Bueller... Bueller... anyone... Bueller... Bueller...

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Fletcher Christian
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Our kids are counting on us to reverse austerity.

According to UNICEF, even in the world's richest countires, children remain “the most enduring victims” of the recession. In the last six years, 2.6 million more kids have fallen below the poverty line, and more than half of them live right here in the United States.

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