Demand withdrawl, Bring the troops home!

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Since 2001 in Afghanistan we have lost 2,013 brave service members in combat.

Since 2003 in Iraq we have lost 4,486 brave service members in combat.

Since 2001 in Chicago we have lost 5,922 private citizens! End the sensless murder of our citizens and demand the President withdraw from Chicago. I have provided year over year murder statistics for the city and its been far worse than Iraq. We should stop spending our blood and treasure in a failed urban war. Chicago has an evil dictator enslaving its citizens to never ending debt and one of the most corrupt governments on the planet. Since 1970 HALF the governors have gone to jail!

2001: 666 MURDERED
2002: 647 MURDERED
2003: 598 MURDERED
2004: 448 MURDERED
2005: 449 MURDERED
2006: 467 MURDERED
2007: 442 MURDERED
2008: 510 MURDERED
2009: 458 MURDERED
2010: 449 MURDERED
2011: 440 MURDERED
2012: 348 MURDERED so far, but only half the year is over!
We need to DEMAND Obama bring the troops home and send them Chicago! Either that or we should demand a withdrawal of Chicago and relocate the people to Iraq or Afghanistan where its safer for them to live without being gunned down. On the weekend Obama visited Chicago there were 35 wounded and 7 killed. That is higher than Iraq & Afghanistan combined!
If Obama refuses to withdraw from the Democratic strong hold of Chicago then would lobby the U.N. for international assistance. Maybe we could get the Security Council to deploy UN troops to Chicago? Replace the evil dictator Emanual and then we could stimulate jobs rebuilding the city with some no-bid contracts!
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liberalsyndrome
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All wars suck. But as wars go, this one has been the safest war in history for Americans. Think of it this way. We have lost 2000 brave souls in ten years of war. On Iwo Jima, in WW2 we lost nearly 7000 Marines in three weeks. The days of this type of combat are over. No Army with the possible exception of China will dare to face us on the battlefield. That is the way it should be. That said, numbers mean nothing to a grieving family. They are as heart broken as can be.

We have killed nearly everybody involved with 911. That is what we set out to do. We won already. Why the Hell are we building schools? Time to come home.

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rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 6:49 am

Libya proved that the 6000 deaths were unnecessary. Iraq was unneccessary from the beginning. The people that launched the war didn't pay any price at all, and never had. Iraq was a campaign maneuver for 2004, plain and simple.

W thought the planned terror attacks that he was breifed on and did nothing about were going to be like the world trade center bombing in '94. Only a couple hundred dead was worth the risk to lay the ground work for Iraq. OOPS!! 9/11, that's the stunned look he showed in the TX school book reading.

The intelligence always goes a little deeper to the consequences of an attack, option 1) successful, response, cost, final result 2) prevented, cost, final result. W chose option 1, because the the response had a higher cost benefit than prevention, both politically and financially.

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Libya proved that the 6000 deaths were unnecessary. Iraq was unneccessary from the beginning. The people that launched the war didn't pay any price at all, and never had, Vietnam either. Iraq was a campaign maneuver for 2004, plain and simple.

W thought the planned terror attacks that he was breifed on and did nothing about were going to be like the world trade center bombing in '94. Only a couple hundred dead was worth the risk to lay the ground work for Iraq. OOPS!! 9/11, that's the stunned look he showed in the TX school book reading.

The intelligence always goes a little deeper to the consequences of an attack, option 1) successful, response, cost, final result 2) prevented, cost, final result. W chose option 1, because the the response had a higher cost benefit than prevention, both politically and financially.

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

We've lost more veterans to suicide in the last 10 years than we have in combat. That tells me that the real battle ground is right here on American soil. While Iraq and Afghanistan get all the headlines as a triumph for Democracy, we are losing our Democracy in large chunks here in the United States Of America. The death toll will be larger than any war in history. Our focus however will be on the evil immigrants and debt and conference spending in Hawaii.

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Bush_Wacker
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Quote Bush_Wacker:

We've lost more veterans to suicide in the last 10 years than we have in combat. That tells me that the real battle ground is right here on American soil. While Iraq and Afghanistan get all the headlines as a triumph for Democracy, we are losing our Democracy in large chunks here in the United States Of America. The death toll will be larger than any war in history. Our focus however will be on the evil immigrants and debt and conference spending in Hawaii.

Looks like we're all in agreement. Time to come home from Afghanistan. We need to pressure the president to get out. Unfortunately the left has largely given him a pass. The demand to come home is not there. Where is the left?

What evil immigrants? Mr sister-in-law and my brother-in-law are both immigrants. Why do you call them evil?

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rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 6:49 am

Of course the continued occupation of Afghanistan is a problem. I've personally come to the conclusion that Afghanistan isn't worth two Nuclear powers becoming enemies. Many of the drone strikes in Pakistan aren't really about destroying Al Qaeda, but protecting our troops across the border. Now we just took out a militant who threatened to ban polio vaccinations until the drone strikes stop. By the way, we used a drone.
http://news.yahoo.com/us-drone-strike-kills-least-five-pakistan-170506890.html

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AjaxMinoan
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm
Quote AjaxMinoan:

Of course the continued occupation of Afghanistan is a problem.

What is the difference between an occupation and a war? If I'm not mistaken an occupation happens after a war as it did in Japan and Germany. S.Korea is not an occupation, we are there because they want us there. Afghanistan is still a war in progress. Correct?

But I agree, our objectives have been met and we need to get out. Why is there no pressure from the left for the president to get out?

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rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 6:49 am
Quote rigel1:

Why is there no pressure from the left for the president to get out?

Probably for the same reason you don't know it's there, has always been there. Ignore it and there's no pressure.

Here are just a few from an easy to find and access site for anyone with even a minimal level of curiosity to go with their flatulent questions (check out the references for yourself):

Protests against the War in Afghanistan 2001-2011

Samples:

On March 20, 2009, in the first large demonstration in Washington, D.C. since Barack Obama became President, thousands of Americans, some bearing mock coffins to protest war casualties, took the streets on the sixth anniversary of the 2003 Iraq invasion to protest the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.[40]

More than 10,000 people marched on the Pentagon. Led by a contingent of Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans, the protesters proceeded on to the headquarters of major military-industrial corporations such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics, and KBR, corporations that the demonstrators characterized as "merchants of death" and to which they sought to deliver symbolic coffins.[41]

In Los Angeles, thousands marched down Hollywood Boulevard to call for all U.S. troops to be brought home. A 4,000-strong crowd took part in the "Stop the Wars" march and rally.[40][42]

Another 4,000 people demonstrated in San Francisco.[41] Rallies against the wars similarly took place in New York City, San Diego, Saint Paul, Minneapolis, and other American cities.[40][43][44][45][46][47]

On October 7, 2009, Students for a Democratic Society called a national day of action against the war in Afghanistan. Over 25 chapters of SDS planned and held various actions around the country.[49][50] A "Funk the War" march led by Rochester SDS was forcibly ended by the police, with 12 of the 60 marchers arrested and later released or bailed out.[51][52]

On the weekend of October 17–18, 2009, anti-war protests took place in 50 cities across the United States. In Boston, hundreds of protesters gathered at Copley Square to protest the war in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq. Zoya, a 28-year-old Afghan woman spoke against the U.S.-led war in her country, saying her homeland does not need more foreign occupation. Suzette Abbot, carrying a sign that read "Yes We Can Get Out of Afghanistan", said "Obama needs to make good on his promises. We all worked to get him elected. Now he needs to earn that peace prize."[53][54][55]

In Minneapolis, 400 people marched, calling for an end to the U.S. war in Afghanistan and an end to the continued U.S. occupation of Iraq.[53]

The organizers in Minneapolis stated:

President Obama is reported to be listening to the generals about the next steps in Afghanistan; he should be listening to the people, who want an end to the war. During the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, the U.S. government is spending billions for wars and occupations, while millions lose their jobs and housing and go without health insurance.

On October 24, 2009, more than 10,000 people marched through the streets of London in protest against the war, which they said is a futile and unwinnable conflict. Protesters called for the withdrawal of British troops from Afghanistan, gathering first at Speakers Corner, Hyde Park, before marching to Trafalgar Square. The number of British soldiers killed in the eight-year-long war was 222 at the time of the protest.[56][57][58][59][60]

Lance Cpl. Joe Glenton defied orders from his commanding officer to become the first serving soldier to openly attend a national anti-war demonstration. He stated:

When I went to Afghanistan I was proud to serve the Army and to serve my country, but before long I realised the government as using the Army for its own ends. It is distressing to disobey orders, but when Britain follows America in continuing to wage war against one of the world's poorest countries I feel I have no choice.

Paul McGuirk, who served in Afghanistan until April 2008 but left the Army because he could not support the war in Afghanistan, said:

I think the government should stop pretending it's a just war and wasting the lives of our guys, and stop pretending it's a winnable war.

The oldest protester taking part in the march, Hetty Bower, 104, lived through both World Wars and said she felt nothing has been learnt. She recalled seeing cheering young men as they marched to the trenches when she was nine-years-old.

It didn't take long before we saw those men coming back missing legs and missing arms, totally blind and war was no longer fun.

2011

In Los Angeles, around 100 people marched downtown to call for an end to the war in Afghanistan on its 10th anniversary. The demonstration started with a prayer service at a church followed by a march to a civic center federal building. 14 peace activists were arrested by authorities for blocking traffic in planned civil disobedience.[70]

Among those attending the protest was actor Mike Farrell from M*A*S*H who said he believed the war has wasted billions of dollars without significantly affecting terrorism. Farrell also stated his disappointment that President Barack Obama, who was given a Nobel Peace Prize, had continued the war in Afghanistan.[70]

In New York City, a protest against the war took place in Times Square. Led by the Granny Peace Brigade, they called for the war in Afghanistan to be ended immediately and troops to be brought home.[71][72]

In New Jersey, around 70 people led by Princeton-based Coalition of Peace Action demonstrated in Trenton to protest the war in Afghanistan on its 10th anniversary – the longest war waged by the United States in its history. Rev. Robert Moore called for American troops to be brought home now, rather than in 2014, in order to save Afghan civilian lives, the lives of American soldiers, and billions of dollars needed at home:[73]

On October 8, 2011, anti-war protesters at the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. were pepper-sprayed by security forces and the museum was closed early. The protesters, estimated at 100 to 200 people, had planned to participate in a "die-in" at the museum's "Military Unmanned Aerial Vehicles" exhibit to protest the massive military spending and the U.S. use of unmanned military drones against civilians in the war in Afghanistan. Under the Obama administration, drone strikes quadrupled from less than 50 under the Bush administration to more than 220 in the past three years. Dozens of protesters were sickened by the pepper spray, and several people fell to the ground in agony.[74][75]

In Chicago, a crowd of around 700 people gathered downtown to protest the decade-long war in Afghanistan. The rally began at noon at Congress Parkway and Michigan Avenue, before the anti-war protest marched through downtown Chicago to call for an end to U.S. military action in Afghanistan. Stopping at President Obama's campaign headquarters for the 2012 presidential election, protesters likened Obama to many of his Republican predecessors in his policies on the war and economy.[76]

Speaking to the crowd, Dennis Kosuth, an emergency room nurse, said:

There's always money for more wars. But there's never enough money for the jobs that we need.

May 16, 2012:

Recent opinion surveys show that American public support for the war in Afghanistan is down to 27 percent, and only 37 percent of Republicans support the ongoing war effort. But some Republican lawmakers have criticized the president for moving too quickly to draw down American troops from Afghanistan, jeopardizing hard won gains.

US Lawmakers Calling for Faster Withdrawal From Afghanistan

For some strange reason we don't find many conservatives in the anti-war camp.

2010:

House rejects call for withdrawal from Afghanistan

The House on Wednesday soundly rejected an effort by anti-war lawmakers to force a withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Afghanistan by the end of the year.

The outcome of the vote, 356-65 against the resolution, was never in doubt. But the 3 1/2 hours of debate did give those who oppose President Barack Obama's war policies a platform to vent their frustrations.

Opposing the resolution was easy for almost all Republicans, who have been solidly behind Obama's decision to increase U.S. troop strength in Afghanistan from 70,000 to 100,000. Only five Republicans supported the measure.

It was a harder vote for some Democrats, particularly in an election year where opposing the war can be equated with opposing the troops. Several expressed discomfort with a war that has lasted 8 1/2 years and cost the nation more than 930 American lives and the treasury more than $200 billion, but said they were voting against the resolution because it was ill-timed and unrealistic.

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.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am

What's appalling to me in this thread is any remorse for the hundreds of thousands of innocent people who have been murdered or displaced by the NATO occupation. Does an Afghani mother grieve any less for her murdered child than an American mother of a killed soldier? Why don't people consider the untold suffering of these faceless people? How can we be so callous?

dhavid
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Jul. 16, 2010 9:41 am
Quote dhavid:

Why don't people consider the untold suffering of these faceless people? How can we be so callous?

What do you expect from a thread of this nature, given the tone of the OP? I don't know about conservatives as a whole group, but the one's that post on this board are flagrant in ommitting any demonstration of their lack of concern in that regard.

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.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am
Quote .ren:
Quote dhavid:

Why don't people consider the untold suffering of these faceless people? How can we be so callous?

What do you expect from a thread of this nature, given the tone of the OP? I don't know about conservatives as a whole group, but the one's that post on this board are flagrant in ommitting any demonstration of their lack of concern in that regard.

Fortunately the crowd I run with does not like to see anyone suffer. We pray for all the innocent victims of war. I think there are more people like us then you realize.

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rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 6:49 am
Quote rigel1:Fortunately the crowd I run with does not like to see anyone suffer. We pray for all the innocent victims of war. I think there are more people like us then you realize.

Any chance the crowd you run with might start praying for NO WARS ?

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Karolina
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Nov. 3, 2011 6:45 pm
Quote Karolina:
Quote rigel1:Fortunately the crowd I run with does not like to see anyone suffer. We pray for all the innocent victims of war. I think there are more people like us then you realize.

Any chance the crowd you run with might start praying for NO WARS ?

Nope it would be impossible for us to start praying for no war. Because we already do it.

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rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 6:49 am
Quote rigel1:
Quote Karolina:
Quote rigel1:Fortunately the crowd I run with does not like to see anyone suffer. We pray for all the innocent victims of war. I think there are more people like us then you realize.

Any chance the crowd you run with might start praying for NO WARS ?

Nope it would be impossible for us to start praying for no war. Because we already do it.

My favorite Movie now is Rambo 3.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rambo_III

At the end of the battle Rambo and Trautman say goodbye to their Mujahideen friends and leave Afghanistan to go home. The movie ends with two quotes: "This film is dedicated to the gallant people of Afghanistan." and "I am like a bullet, filled with lead and made to kill". However, this was not the original quote in the movie. The first ending quote of the movie read "This film is dedicated to the brave Mujahideen fighters of Afghanistan".

anonymous green
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Jan. 5, 2012 10:47 am
Quote anonymous green:
Quote rigel1:
Quote Karolina:
Quote rigel1:Fortunately the crowd I run with does not like to see anyone suffer. We pray for all the innocent victims of war. I think there are more people like us then you realize.

Any chance the crowd you run with might start praying for NO WARS ?

Nope it would be impossible for us to start praying for no war. Because we already do it.

My favorite Movie now is Rambo 3.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rambo_III

At the end of the battle Rambo and Trautman say goodbye to their Mujahideen friends and leave Afghanistan to go home. The movie ends with two quotes: "This film is dedicated to the gallant people of Afghanistan." and "I am like a bullet, filled with lead and made to kill". However, this was not the original quote in the movie. The first ending quote of the movie read "This film is dedicated to the brave Mujahideen fighters of Afghanistan".

Yeah, that was back in the day when they were using American weapons and expertise to kill communists. Long before the Taliban took over and they started the beheadings, stonings and shooting women in the back of the head for being seen with a man.

Ah, the good ole days!

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rigel1
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Jan. 31, 2011 6:49 am

I wish that you would stop calling the Soviet Union communists—it was a totalitarian, authoritarian, oligarchical government and a police state. Just like here now.

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Karolina
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