frAHnce?

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Thom, you're the best and I love you ..... BUT

please don't say frAHnce. You're not French. You don't have a French accent. You should say frANce.

Listen to any British speaker. They NEVER try to use the accent of the country from the word they are saying.

They keep it real and just say all words as if they were English words. The main reason, in my opinion, is that it always sounds

pretentious. For those with a discerning ear, it sounds goofy to try to immitate an accent that you don't really speak.

I'm from the south, and I cringe when someone not from here tries to sound southern.

peace

Gore2008nm
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Comments

I think we should call all countries by their native name and/or pronunciation. . Deutchland, Nederlands, Norge, MeHico, Italia, Espana etc etc. Why not?

Erik300's picture
Erik300
Joined:
Apr. 2, 2010 10:44 am
Quote Gore2008nm:

Listen to any British speaker. They NEVER try to use the accent of the country from the word they are saying.

They keep it real and just say all words as if they were English words. The main reason, in my opinion, is that it always sounds

pretentious. For those with a discerning ear, it sounds goofy to try to immitate an accent that you don't really speak.

Seriously? So a Brit will say "Nise" instead of "Neese"? "Provins" instead of "Proavons"? I knew a nun that advocated this years ago, I think she was Italian.

chilidog
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

I'm not saying that Brits don't have their own sound/accent. Obviously, they do... they sound British. Just they don't try to sound like anything else just because they happen to be using a word or title that is not native to Great Britian. Listen to them for a while, and you'll see what I mean. KEEP IT REAL

Gore2008nm
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

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