Want a free vacation?

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Do you usually spend $230/ night for a hotel? I know what you're thinking. Typically not. But in this case you are. Just not for you. It's part of a million dollar vacation to Hawaii that you have generously given the 9th circuit court. They are justifying this vacation by calling it a "conference." Have you ever noticed that they never seem to have these "conferences" in Fargo? They always seem to be in Hawaii, Vegas or Puerto Rico. Why? BECAUSE IT'S A VACATION! You can have a conference in Dog Slobber, Mississippi if it were about work. But of course that would not be fun. So these rich government lawyers are forcing you to pay their bill to Hawaii. You may not be able to afford a trip of your own to Hawaii, but thank God you are graciously paying for yet another group of government fat cats to go to paradise. Did I mention its free? Hell, the American people give away more free vacations than Pat Sajak. We are so nice!

All I ask is that the 9th circuit send me a post card. Is that too much to ask for my kindness?

rigel1's picture
rigel1
Joined:
Jan. 31, 2011 7:49 am

Comments

I can send you a Mr. Rushmore post card if you like. :)

Bush_Wacker's picture
Bush_Wacker
Joined:
Jun. 25, 2011 7:53 am

Questions are, does Fargo have the facilities to host such a group?

And, if they held it in Fargo, what would attendence be vs Honolulu?

Are these conferences a part of vacations? Sure, but is that a bad thing?

And if by holding them in places people want to go, more people attend, is that a bad thing?

Phaedrus76's picture
Phaedrus76
Joined:
Sep. 14, 2010 8:21 pm
Quote Bush_Wacker:

I can send you a Mr. Rushmore post card if you like. :)

That's better than nothing......................I guess.

rigel1's picture
rigel1
Joined:
Jan. 31, 2011 7:49 am

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The GOP war on workers has killed again...

It’s time to stop the conservative's war on working people in America.

Since the birth of our nation, conservatives have always been wary of average working-class Americans having too much political or economic power. John Adams, the second President of the United States and a Federalist (precursor to today’s Republicans), was very wary of the working class, which he referred to as “the rabble.”

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