Corporations are not people? Huh?

58 posts / 0 new

Comments

Quote drc2:

It matters a lot if the corporation exists to make money as its primary duty. It can only be involved in bribing public policy for its own profit. Even if it believes that it is doing "God's Work," it needs to let the citizens decide that without the "special interest" of profit speaking at all if it cannot respect the speech of others. Rich people can always just join together to advocate for elite privilege, but they have to spend their own money so it can pass through a human bank account.

No, drc, it doesn't matter at all. All corporations, even unions and the Sierra Club, exist to make money as their primary duty. The only difference is what they do with the money after its been earned. Respecting or disrespecting what is done with that money or what kind of speech the organization engages in, is a perfectly reasonable reaction from you or me. It is not a valid reason for the government to decide who the winners and losers are for 1st amendment protection. The 1st amendment must apply to everyone equally.

Paleo-con
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm
Quote Paleo-con:

All corporations, even unions and the Sierra Club, exist to make money as their primary duty.

How do you figure?

chilidog
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

If corporations are people, will BP and all of their People Stockholders being going to prison for killing 12 workers?

Phaedrus76's picture
Phaedrus76
Joined:
Sep. 14, 2010 8:21 pm

Phaedrus, "If corporations are people, will BP and all of their People Stockholders being going to prison for killing 12 workers?"

No, because of the legal technecality afforded only to corporations od limited liability.

camaroman's picture
camaroman
Joined:
May. 9, 2012 11:30 am

Oh, so when they want more power, they are people, when the rich are to be held accountable for their actions they have have special immunities. I got it.
Can you show me in the constitution where groups of rich people get this special immunity?

Phaedrus76's picture
Phaedrus76
Joined:
Sep. 14, 2010 8:21 pm

Limited Liability of a CorporationX By Richard Morgan, eHow Contributor Corporations have certain financial protection in lawsuits.

If a corporation is engaged in a lawsuit, certain protections allow the company owners from being directly targeted. The corporate acts as a unique entity, which means its liability is limited to corporate assets. Any assets not part of the corporation are exempt from any financial awards as a result of a lawsuit.

A corporation can also spin certain assets or products off into other corporations. Just like monsanto has done with round-up and its other chemicals. They spun them off into a new corporation, Solutia, basically a dummy corporation, to protect corporate asstes from lawsuits regarding round-up and other chemicals. Although, Solutia is a publicly held corporation. Here is a nice tidy history of one of the most evil and harmful monopoly multinational corproations on earth, IMO.

http://bestmeal.info/monsanto/company-history.shtml

camaroman's picture
camaroman
Joined:
May. 9, 2012 11:30 am

Monsanto should be the poster child against 1st and 14th amendment rights for corporations.. The limited liability laws protects the money and assets of owners against their dastardly pollution and evronmental damamges caused by their operations and use of their deadly chemicals. If the federal government really wanted to do something meaningful about the environment, they would pass laws and go after the real culprits like monsanto and its top management. Let the stockholders suck on their pollution. But that ain't gonna happen in today's continuing corporate/government collusion.

camaroman's picture
camaroman
Joined:
May. 9, 2012 11:30 am

Currently Chatting

The Ferguson Effect On Our Great Grand Children

A few weeks ago, Congressman Paul Ryan released his latest proposal for tackling America’s poverty epidemic. Unfortunately, the plan does very little to combat poverty in our country, and instead, continues the devastating austerity policies that Ryan himself helped to create. Thanks to those policies, entire communities across America are underwater, and struggling to survive in tough economic times.

Powered by Pressflow, an open source content management system