Secure voting technology IS possible

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Love your show Thom. I've been a listener/viewer for years along with the other prog heroes like Big Eddie, Rachel etc.

I would quibble with your statement earlier today that it is impossible to have a secure voting technology. I have almost 40 years of experience in computer technology (last 30 years as a full-time professional software engineer, developer, consultant and educator) and it IS in fact possible. The problem with current voting technologies (the term "technologies" encompassing computer hardware, software, networking and data communication contexts) is a lack of expertise and thoroughness in their creation - in addition to the very real possibilities of purposeful corruption as you have been discussing on your show today (7/12/2012) as a consequence of it being done by a private (not to mention right-leaning) company.

I, as a SINGLE software developer, could architect, design and develop a voting technology that would be virtually impregnable and impossible to "game". I have actually thought on this topic ever since the presidential election was stolen in 2000, and the recent results in Wisconsin look mighty fishy to me. I would be glad to have further correspondence with you about the details concerning secure voting technology (which of course become pretty technical but I am good at explaining highly technical subjects to non-technical peeps).

Sincerely, Warren

stillrockin77's picture
stillrockin77
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Jul. 12, 2012 12:27 pm

Comments

Why don't we stick with something we can see and touch? Paper ballots, stones, etc.

chilidog
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

I am real old school here. Paper ballots and pencils. Ballots counted by hand and eye and kept for any requested audit. With people watching each other, it works. If people are conspiring together, finding ways to stuff the ballot box or cheat is hard to stop.

But, paper ballots and some ability to track real voters from forged numbers or ballots are far better than black box machines with software privately owned and unavailable to public officials. What we have is an invitation to fix elections.

drc2
Joined:
Apr. 26, 2012 12:15 pm

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mark.felmo
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Aug. 6, 2012 11:44 pm

You really only need secure machines and proper ratios* in swing states with republican governors and republican secy of states. The red states don't matter.

The ratios are not a problem if the voting starts on a thursday and ends on the following monday. Most civilized, corruption free countries, aka democracies, have whole weekend voting, .

Airport kiosks handle tickets securely, don't double ticket, verify identity, and print the transaction.

Barcodes don't require photos and only count once. If the program won't accept your vote, someone has likely stolen your ID.

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

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teddy.jolex
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Aug. 29, 2012 4:22 am

You're only talking about the Presidential election. ALL the elections are important, starting with the dogcatcher. That's how the right wing got its tentacles everywhere. We're never going to get 218 Representatives if we surrender the handful we get out of the Confederacy.

chilidog
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

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