Free Internet Book: "Global Employment Trends" 2013, ILO

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"This Global Employment Trends report for 2013 is a special edition, warranted by the resurgence of the crisis in 2012. The year 2011 saw a tapering off of the recovery, followed by a dip in both growth and employment in 2012. Unemployment increased by a further 4 million over the course of 2012.
The report examines the crisis in labour markets of both advanced economies and developing
economies.

The epicentre of the crisis has been the advanced economies, accounting for
half of the total increase in unemployment of 28 million since the onset of the crisis. But the
pronounced double dip in the advanced economies has had significant spillovers into the labour
markets of developing economies as well. A quarter of the increase of 4 million in global unemployment
in 2012 has been in the advanced economies, while three quarters has been in
other regions, with marked effects in East Asia, South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.
The report estimates the quantitative and qualitative indicators of global and regional
labour markets and discusses the macroeconomic factors affecting the labour markets in order
to explore possible policy responses."

to read the 7-page executive summary "Recovering from a second jobs dip" published January 21, 2012, click on

http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---dgreports/---dcomm/---publ/documents/publication/wcms_202215.pdf

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demandside
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