Christopher Dorner LYNCHED by lLAPD/law enforcement, live on national TV, DURING the President's SOTU address!!

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Am I really the only person who has noticed this yet?

According to news reports, LAPD claims to have "no idea" how the fire started (highly suspect claim); according to CNN report, LAPD also refused exit to one person from the burning building (assumedly Dorner); LAPD also refused to allow firefighters near the burning building (even though they're completely equipped for the task, and that's their job); this all happend LIVE, during President Obama's SOTU Address.

In the American South, we would call that a "High Profile Lynching". Any thoughts, anyone?

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yabbadoody
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The LAPD is a sociopathic organization. The truth about what they did to push Dorner to the point he had nothing left to lose will never be exposed.

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darlinedarline1...
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Quote yabbadoody:[...]according to CNN report, LAPD also refused exit to one person from the burning building (assumedly Dorner);[...]

Links please.

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mjolnir
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Mar. 3, 2011 11:42 am

here's one:

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2013/02/12/police-checking-reports-that-ex-lap...

Though this isn't the report I heard of during a radio broadcast last night (sorry no link live radio), it's quite clear from this report that:

1. Multiple members of SWAT team enter structure where Dorner is believed to be present.

2. SWAT team used 'smoke' grenades (widely known to law enforcement as "incendiary devices", when used in rustic wood structures - WACO compound raid as an excellent example)

3. SWAT Team bellieves it killed suspect, yet leaves body behind (!!!)

4. firefighters not allowed to enter building, and there is no report of Police allowing them to fight the fire (due to suspected presence of "unknown quantity of rounds" - though there would be no reason to enter the building if suspect, dead or alive, had been removed from the structure)

With one suspect and multiple SWAT members present, and law enforcement fully knowing what 'smoke' grenades would do to this wooden structure, there's little room for doubt what was intended to happen. And there was a radio account last night where CNN had reported police did NOT allow an occupant to leave the structure.

IF the suspect was believed to be Dorner (and it's clear that it was), then LAPD Tactical Command would most certainly have been in direct contact, and thus directly involved in the operation, regardless of what authority was physically present on site.

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yabbadoody
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I would not use the term "lynching" to describe a hunt for a killer. Technically, lynching is violence to intimidate others than the victims and it includes a lot more than hanging from a tree.

I have no idea what the LAPD ran into up there with a highly trained renegade cop out for revenge.

I am not surprised to find that personnel policies are not great or that there would be unresoved grievances from what is not a highly regarded force. We will not find out much about what drove this guy over the edge, but by the time he had killed several cops and gone on the lam it is hard to think that they would not be bringing their full militarized arsenal to bear.

I also have no way of knowing whether Dorner was holding hostages or hiding with associates. I would not expect the cops to be kind to his friends helping him hide.

Fortunately, I was at a Mardi Gras jazz dinner instead of watching the State of the Union or the real live Cops instead of the usual tv version.

drc2
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Apr. 26, 2012 11:15 am

As per the TIMING of the event of Dorner being "apprehended" / murdered, then incinerated - DURING the SOTU Address, which was being given by the Nation's first African American President, in his final term of office - well, I guess one could only characterize that an an "unfortunate coincidence" for LAPD and law enforcement in general.

On the other hand, I guarantee you the point is NOT lost on the entire African-American community, that it positively REEKS of a modern "live lynching", and that similar to the Rodney King beating/LA Riots which resulted, LAPD will NEVER "live this down".

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yabbadoody
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from the CNN link above:

"[Updated at 9:14 p.m. ET] Earlier, we reported that U.S. Marshals Service district chief Kurt Ellingson told us a suspect tried to get out the back door of the cabin at some point today and was pushed back inside. But there are now conflicting reports about whether the suspect ever emerged.

Ellingson says authorities are not sure whether the suspect came out."

I can say this much about the report - US Marshalls are highly trained law enforcement officers, and as such are NOT prone to "making up non-existent information" or reporting non-incidents, reason being is that FALSE INFORMATION OFTEN GETS OFFICERS KILLED. Accuracy is important, even in statements to the press.

As such, the fact that there exist LATER reports of a reputed 'conflict of opinion' with the US Marshall's situation assessment does NOT reflect on the US Mashall's statement, and instead points to the reality that LAPD likely realized what a PR Nightmare they were stepping into with this, therefore the Marshall's statement MUST be refuted by "another source" (source as yet unidentified).

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yabbadoody
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Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

From the point of view of law enforcement: If Dorner HAD exited the structure, he would be an EXPOSED TARGET for any of the multiple officers / snipers located within yards of the structure.

Case closed, game over, suicide by cop. Which is precisely why I feel the US Marshall's earleir statement was contradicted, since:

1. there is no mention of gunfire during that exchange, whatever it was that happened - and if gunfire had been exchanged by the suspect, the US Marshall would've made note in their statement

2. There was no reason or evidence to believe that Dorner had otherwise 'wired' himself with explosives, or was in the presence of some mass-incendiary device

3. there was no particular tactical reason to have the 'target' remain hidden from armed law enforcement present on the scene at that time

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yabbadoody
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http://www.alternet.org/news-amp-politics/how-law-enforcement-and-media-...

The account begins thus:

"At approximately 7 PM ET, I listened through a police scanner as San Bernadino Sheriffs gave the order to burn down the cabin where suspected murderer Christopher Dorner was allegedly hiding."

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yabbadoody
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Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

Why local news staff would censor themselves at law enforcement request, when reporting from a remote mountaintop in the woods, remains a mystery.

Why they would not investigate further the nature of an INTENTIONALLY SET FIRE BY LAW ENFORCEMENT is nothing less than a complete breach of public trust, and a dereliction of duty.

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yabbadoody
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Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

Christopher dorner was a bad cop that lied about what happened at a traffic stop the LAPD investigated his claims, they were found to be false. He was fired from his job for filing a false police report (criminal act). The navy refused to let him re-enlist for conduct unbecoming an officer or whatever other reason they wanted to use with this p.o.s. of a person.

He released a manifesto that said he was going to take revenge on those who did this to him. He killed people that had nothing to do with him being a p.o.s. The marshals and the LAPD did what they had to do to put this mad dog nut job down just as they should have.

The p.o.s. throw a smoke canister out the back door in order to escape yet again. Once the door opened officers pushed the armed suspect back inside. ( I think by returning fire)

The P.O.S. would have been given a few minutes to come out if he did not come out the police outside will launch teargas into the building. The teargas canisters can start stuff on fire but the suspect can leave the premises anytime they want at that point. If the building does catch on fire the police will not allow fire fighters any where near the structure until they know that structure is secure either by verifying that the suspect is dead or by having the suspect in custody, because the suspect did not come out of the building that kept the fire fighters from doing their job.

I say good riddance

firearm owner
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Jan. 18, 2013 8:52 am

Interesting POV, firearm.

Unfortunately in modern parlance, it's called "You have the right to be burned alive" - though law and practice do not support that claim, and as a result officer's actions may result in civil penalties and incarceration.

Just like in war: There is conduct which is condoned, and there is conduct which is NEVER condoned.

I take it you were never an officer.

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yabbadoody
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drc2,"I would not use the term "lynching" to describe a hunt for a killer. Technically, lynching is violence to intimidate others than the victims and it includes a lot more than hanging from a tree."

Ever hear of a metaphor? The metaphorical "lynching of Dorner was the racist LAPD's message to intimidate others not to cross the unspoken "blue line" of the brotherhood of the LAPD. Ever hear of Rodney King? That was not was not meant for the public's eyes. They are a bunch of sociopaths. Dorner was just not your right victim in your world of victimhood.

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darlinedarline1...
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Aug. 29, 2012 8:27 am

L A police has changed a bit.

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douglaslee
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Apparently, it took law enforcement some 45 minutes to realize they'd better 'get their story straight' if they were to deny setting fire to a live suspect:

"[Updated at 8:34 p.m. ET] At some point today, a suspect tried to get out the back door of the cabin, but he was pushed back inside, U.S. Marshals Service district chief Kurt Ellingson told CNN's Brian Todd.

We're still waiting for details about the fire at the cabin, which began about an hour ago."

Retraction of this initial incident, filed by a US Marshall District Chief, would not happen for nearly an hour:
http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2013/02/12/police-checking-reports-that-ex-lap...

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yabbadoody
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Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

This guy was pissed off, too.

When you fire someone should you consider whether they are a gun nut or not?

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"[Updated at 7:22 p.m. ET] Black smoke is rising high in the air from the cabin area, video from CNN affiliate KABC shows. The video appeared to be taken from a distance; authorities had asked news helicopters to keep well away.

[Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET] Authorities have launched tear gas at the cabin, and a tactical operation is under way, Former FBI Assistant Director Tom Fuentes tells CNN."

So, if we are to believe CNN reports made at the time of the seige: The cabin had been afire [due to incendiary cannisters being used, here called 'tear gas'] for more than an hour before the US Marshall District Chief's statement that a man had attempted to leave the [burning] cabin, reported at 8:34. Then 45 minutes after THAT statement, the District Chief's statement is 'amended', reported at 9:14.

Apparently, this was done to soften facts of the situation at hand, and the nature of force and tactics used against a live suspect.

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2013/02/12/police-checking-reports-that-ex-lap...

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yabbadoody
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It is here, after supporting extemporaneous news documentation has been presented, that I would like to REMIND those of us not hailing from the American South, that BURNING A MAN ALIVE was but one of the methods more commonly historically used in the mass crimes known as "lynching" of black men and boys in America.

The practice has subsequently been refined ("necklacing", et al) and has unfortunately become common in certain regions of the Carribean, as well as in some parts of Africa during unrelated regional conflicts in recent years.

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yabbadoody
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Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

I think "lynching" is an appropriate description -- reflecting INTENTIONAL RACIST MESSAGING by the LAPD and many paramilitary in the police forces.

As soon as my friend and I heard that the building was burned, we looked at each other and said this is a racist tradition! This is what racist police do to blacks:

o Philadelphia police burned blacks alive in their house -- the MOVE group, including children and women-- coverage on Democracy Now http://www.democracynow.org/2010/5/13/25_years_ago_philadelphia_police_bombs

o Burning suspects who are black in a building happened back when the SymbioneseLiberation Army members were trapped, also: http://articles.latimes.com/1994-05-18/local/me-59109_1_east-54th-street

o We know there was a southern racism so heinous, its perpetrators (including public officials and police who were KKK members) tortured their victims in numerous ways, that they lynched many blacks, AND also burned down many black homes, often trapping their victims inside. This occurred post Civil War 1800s and also in the twentieth century. These crimes went unpunished, as law enforcement was part of the problem evidently.

The law enforcement community is supposed to protect the community, including every citizen -- and that includes protecting us against HATE CRIMES, too. However, it appears the LAPD is too awash in racist hatred to care to completely fulfill its duties. From the events before us, institutional racism is being kept alive by this particular institution.

By reports on this blog, it appears no attempt was made to capture Dorner alive and deliver him up for trial.

Dorner's EXECUTION BY FIRE perpetrated by this LAPD that thinks it is Judge-Jury-Executioner and acts as Judge-Jury-Executioner, only proves the racial abuse Dorner experienced was real, and it is totally believable that he was ostracized first because he was black and second because he stood up against racist bias and treatment in the LAPD.

Another dismal chapter in the American story of injustice and violence, and broken trust initiated by those in authority.

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nora
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

You point out this occurred during the SOTU speech.

Thanks for making that point.

Do you think it was only coincidental?

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nora
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nora, "Dorner's EXECUTION BY FIRE perpetrated by this LAPD that thinks it is Judge-Jury-Executioner and acts as Judge-Jury-Executioner, only proves the racial abuse Dorner experienced was real, and it is totally believable that he was ostracized first because he was black and second because he stood up against racist bias and treatment in the LAPD."

Not only did it send the "lynching" message of intimidation. Dorner's "lyching" insured that he would not be able to attempt to expose any more ugly realities regarding the policies and practices of the LAPD.

darlinedarline1@aol.com's picture
darlinedarline1...
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I enjoy reading all the support for a man who hunted people. I can only assume the support for his is due to skin color, political beliefs (read his manifesto) and cop killer. I can only imagine the posts if he was a white tea party member.

Marlin60
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Apr. 9, 2012 3:04 am

If he was a Teabagger, the LAPDogs still would have killed him to stop him from voicing any more opposition during his trial to this bullshit war criminal country.

And more importantly, if he was a Teabagger, he wouldn't have had the balls to take on the system in the first place. Remember how Teabaggers voted for Palin and then for Mormney? Teabaggers are too fucking stupid to know who to rebel against.

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JTaylor
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Quote Marlin60:

I enjoy reading all the support for a man who hunted people. I can only assume the support for his is due to skin color, political beliefs (read his manifesto) and cop killer. I can only imagine the posts if he was a white tea party member.

100% correct, and where is all the outcry for the fact this "left wing gun nut" had access to those evil "assault weapons". Only on a progressive board could a story about a rogue cop, turned murderer, that was caught and killed in whatever manner, be turned into a "rascist" ,"society turned him into something he wasn't" pile of crap story. If anything, his love for the likes of Mr. tingle up my leg Chris Matthews pushed him over the edge. Maybe at the next state of the union speech Michelle can put the widow and two little children of Jeremiah MacKay on display in her box. God forbid, if this guy had been right wing survivalist type.

Dorner got exactly what he deserved, and in the process saved the State of California millions of dollars in trials and riot/looting damages.

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Redwing
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Quote Marlin60:

I enjoy reading all the support for a man who hunted people. I can only assume the support for his is due to skin color, political beliefs (read his manifesto) and cop killer. I can only imagine the posts if he was a white tea party member.

Yeah, me too. Weren't his first two victims "people of color"? Not that it makes any difference. He had opportunities to surrender, chose not to, and paid the price.

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mjolnir
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Quote JTaylor:

If he was a Teabagger, the LAPDogs still would have killed him to stop him from voicing any more opposition during his trial to this bullshit war criminal country.

And more importantly, if he was a Teabagger, he wouldn't have had the balls to take on the system in the first place. Remember how Teabaggers voted for Palin and then for Mormney? Teabaggers are too fucking stupid to know who to rebel against.

Typical response "Teabagger" cops are bad, country evil war criminal, insult Palin, criticize Mormons, curse(can't make a point without cursing) call people stupid. I bow to your intellect, No, I am doubled over laughing!

Marlin60
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Apr. 9, 2012 3:04 am
Quote yabbadoody:

Interesting POV, firearm.

Unfortunately in modern parlance, it's called "You have the right to be burned alive" - though law and practice do not support that claim, and as a result officer's actions may result in civil penalties and incarceration.

Just like in war: There is conduct which is condoned, and there is conduct which is NEVER condoned.

I take it you were never an officer.

I understand that there are some things you just do not do even in war, putting your people needlesly in harms way is one of them, the police could not say for sure that the left wing mad dog cop killer was not waiting inside for the unarmed fire fighters to enter the building or not. they introduced tear gas it is up to him to come out at that point, if he does not come out and the building catches on fire and he still does not come out. the police will wait a certain amount of time before they allow anyone to get near the building so that they do not introduce hostages or more deaths to the situtation.

when the police say the left wing mad dog cop killer was pushed back into the building did he come out unarmed, or did he throw a smoke gernade out the door and come out armed?

firearm owner
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Jan. 18, 2013 8:52 am

The LAPD has a history of being like a gang culture and racist. Does anybody remember Rodny King, Rampart?

Rampart officers also wore tattoos of the CRASH logo, a skull with a cowboy hat surrounded by poker cards depicting the “dead man's hand,” aces and eights. Other CRASH units wore similar tattoos. CRASH paraphernalia, with this logo, is still for sale at the LAPD gift shop.

An officer could not join Rampart CRASH without a reliable “sponsor” to vouch for the officer's “character.” Officers who had worked with the prospective initiate were contacted to find out if the candidate was too “by- the-book,” that is, undesirable for initiation. A “solid” or “stand-up” candidate was someone who bent the rules—planting evidence, falsifying probable cause to arrest and committing perjury in court testimony.

Once in the unit, the officer's conduct was closely monitored to make sure he or she could be trusted to be “in the loop.” Once in, the officers were trained in CRASH methods, such as planting weapons. The job of CRASH supervisors “in the loop” was to protect the CRASH line officers from investigation by higher-ups of their misdeeds.

If only Dorner had stuck to lawless brutality against the poor and powerless, rather than engaging in lawless brutality against his fellow officers and their families, he'd have been fine. Maybe even make captain someday.

The problem, viewed from the perspective of The Sociopathic System, isn't that he was a lawless killer. It's that he was a lawless killer killing people that The Sociopathic System deemed important.

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darlinedarline1...
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Since when did it become acceptable in this country to burn a man alive no matter what he's accused of doing? I understand being pissed off at someone who killed your co-workers. I get that. I'd be boiling pissed as well. That doesn't make it ok to burn a POS alive. Nothing makes that OK. It was done intentionally even though the Police Captain stated that they didn't burn the cabin down on purpose. Police Scanner recordings say the exact opposite. The officers involved are saying "burn the effin cabin", "burn that effer". It's all on tape. No matter what the circumstances are, here in America the police are not given authority to be judge, jury and executioner. Let alone execute by means of burning someone alive.

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Bush_Wacker
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Jun. 25, 2011 6:53 am

For the technically challenged: When ammunition is subject to extreme heat, such as a burning building, it explodes. When it explodes, the casings and bullets fly off in random directions at a high velocity. Firemen wear fire resistant suits, not bullet resistant suits. Therefore, it is common practice for firemen not to enter a building when it contains suspected ammunition or explosives and to let the fire burn itself out.

Now for the sociopathic nut cases making excuses for this evil man, Dorner. Four people were killed that had nothing to do with his imaginary maltreatments. Children, one as young as four months, will now have to live without loving fathers. Dorner was dismissed from every organization he was in once they discovered what a scum bucket he was. The only thing that might be sicker than Dorner is the pathetic minds that actually machinate excuses for a serial killer. Disgusting!

Speaking of disgusting, listen to all the outcry for gun control, mental background checks, and magazine limits. Oops, we don't hear anything at all. Funny how heads are turned when it is one of their own. Dorner was not the victim. The victims can be found at the other end of his trigger finger.

Paleo-con
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm
Quote Bush_Wacker:

Since when did it become acceptable in this country to burn a man alive no matter what he's accused of doing? I understand being pissed off at someone who killed your co-workers. I get that. I'd be boiling pissed as well. That doesn't make it ok to burn a POS alive. Nothing makes that OK. It was done intentionally even though the Police Captain stated that they didn't burn the cabin down on purpose. Police Scanner recordings say the exact opposite. The officers involved are saying "burn the effin cabin", "burn that effer". It's all on tape. No matter what the circumstances are, here in America the police are not given authority to be judge, jury and executioner. Let alone execute by means of burning someone alive.

Dorner is the only one that made the decision to burn himself alive; if he was alive. If you can show us that the Sheriff entered the building, incapacitated him to make sure he couldn't leave, then exited the building and set it of fire, then I am with you. Until then, this just looks like misdirected empathy for a murderer of innocent people.

Paleo-con
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Good riddance, I could agree with you, execpt I remember the whole story. It is not that Chris Dorner was cheated due process. It is that we were cheated due process. LAPD was determined to execute, as a result two women were shot in the back by those sworn to protect them. LAPD should be congragulated for makeing us safe from Chris Dorner, then they should tried for murder, executing civilians they've not yet identified suggest an extreme act of deparation.

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dialindicator
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Dec. 15, 2012 6:44 pm

Should the LAPD be given an automatic pass, no matter how sociopathic their behavior was in this and past incidences, because THEY are the authorities? And the authorities are always in the right and never commit any atrocities and if they do, they are always right no matter their sociopathic schemes.

In the progressive world of victimhood triumphancy, Dorner was not the right victim.

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darlinedarline1...
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Quote dialindicator:

Good riddance, I could agree with you, execpt I remember the whole story. It is not that Chris Dorner was cheated due process. It is that we were cheated due process. LAPD was determined to execute, as a result two women were shot in the back by those sworn to protect them. LAPD should be congragulated for makeing us safe from Chris Dorner, then they should tried for murder, executing civilians they've not yet identified suggest an extreme act of deparation.

Perhaps you don't really remember the whole story. The police shot at three innocent people. One was shot in the back, one got a cut from broken glass, and the other was unharmed. Nobody was killed or murdered. If anyone had died, then I would agree to the murder charge. As is, I feel that the police involved should be charged with reckless endangerment, if not attempted murder. Nobody is above the law.

Of course, none of this has anything to do with the issue of Dorner murdering four innocent people. Dorner should be held accountable for his own crimes just as the police above will be held accountable for their own crimes.

Paleo-con
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

I may be mistaken, but if I am correct then forensic officials are still trying to identify the body.

As such, at present we only know that a 'black male suspect' was attempted to be burned alive by police agencies, likely at the direction of LAPD Tactical Command. Upon that realization, it also appears that in all liklihood the suspect took his own life - thus depriving police of their attempted act of murder, acts of which are not covered in any police manual, nor sanctioned under law.

Whether the man eventually identified is Dorner or not, I'd say the timing, the circumstances, and the tactics used against the suspect are due cause for citizen alarm and should subsequently spark a Federal Gran Jury.

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yabbadoody
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Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

I stand corrected. It appears you caught me shooting at the facts from behind. Media reports sometimes confuse me. Photographs of a truck with the tailgate and rear cab shot full of holes seems clear however. Original reports said there were two gunshot victims, one serious. I have not seen any recent follow-up reports. I sincerely hope the victims have and will completely recover and LAPD is only tried for attempted murder.

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dialindicator
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Dec. 15, 2012 6:44 pm

While it REMAINS unclear who the suspect is, it is patently clear that Dorner chose not to "burn himself alive". Police have no right to murder with impunity - kill in self-defense, correct. Not murder with impunity, even though many 'get away with it' due to the code of silence.

It's most unfortunate in this case that we have various comments of the law enforcement 'cheering section' on tape... not only as evidence of the crime being committed in real time, but because of the loss of public trust invovled, and the loss of the officers' honor.

In the military there's a phrase for a group of soldiers who've lost all respect and responsibility to their superiors or the laws of war (and there ARE laws of war):

It's called "murderous mob".

Many soldiers spend the better part of their lives in brig for simply 'forgetting who they are' and whom they represent, even for a moment. Even for one moment.

Should we expect less of our civilian law enforcement officers, many of whom a recruited directly from military service? I think not.

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yabbadoody
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Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

dialindicator: that is correct, assuming you're speaking about the LAPD's vastly overreaching efforts at apprehending Dorner - without substantiation of the target identity PRIOR TO LIVE FIRE IN PUBLIC.

If I'm not mistaken, at least 3 civilians in two separate incidents were nearly PUBLICLY ASSASSINATED WITHOUT CAUSE for nothing more than the "offense" of driving a vehicle SIMILAR to the one Dorner was believed to be driving.

One of these was a septaugenarian Latino woman whom was delivering newspapers with her daughter.

Great resemblance to Dorner there, eh? (Guess "they all look alike" to LAPD)

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yabbadoody
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Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

People should note that the fire started with the second infusion of the much more effective pyrotechnic tear gas cannisters following the first barrage of non-combustible and less effective gas. Dorner knew the techniques involved since all major departments teach the difference following the Philadelphia tragedy. He had a chance to surrender and chose not to do so. May GOD forgive him.

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mjolnir
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Mar. 3, 2011 11:42 am

correction, the suspect (not yet identified as Dorner) was not ALLOWED to do so by law enforcement on the scene - who could've killed him easily at that point in time, had he posed further threat.

Read the news report, CNN, 8:34 p.m. day of the incident... then read the retraction, 45 minutes later at 9:14. Building had been burning for more than one hour. It took US Marchalls almost an hour to "coincide" their earlier report with San Bernardino County Sherriff's cover story, thereby casting doubt that the event ever happened when it was clearly reported an hour earlier.

Not allowing a suspect to leave a burning building is murder - whether it's Philly PD, whether the FBI does it at WACO, or whether San Bernadino Sherriff/US Marshalls refused the suspect exit and surrender in the woods above LA County.

That's called 'murder', and in this case it's an execution style, mafia hit-style revenge killing. There is no Statue of Limitations for murder. There is no immunity for law enforcement officers from charges of deliberate murder, even in the apprehension of suspected murderers.

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yabbadoody
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Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

To anyone who thinks "deliberate murder" is an effective "weapon" to use against criminal suspects, or against any criminal suspect:

Good for you. Great idea. Perhaps you should convince your local police departments to begin recruiting new officers from among violent offenders in Death Row instead of the ranks of those with distinguished military service... likewise, they might possibly begin accepting job applications from "Mafia hit men", or violent "fixers" involed with organized crime.

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yabbadoody
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Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

yabbadoody sounds like someone from the Randi Rhodes message board where every action is racist. Be careful who you want to make a martyr or hero out of. I suspect most people including the police and Dorner knew he wasn't coming out of that cabin alive. It's not like he walked into a police station and gave himself up. With his home invasions and carjackings in Big Bear, he was obviously a danger to all at that point. Yabbadoody, your outrage is better expressed at the killings of unarmed black men by the police rather than this guy.

DynoDon
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Jun. 29, 2012 9:24 am

DD - "Dorner knew he wasn't coming out of that cabin alive."

You're actually backing up Dorner's manifesto when you say this. You're also condoning potentially unlawful actions by law enforcement, which further justifies and corroborates the accusations Dorner made in his manifesto, which I'm pretty sure is what you were trying NOT to do.

Dorner went Looney Tunes to be certain - yet the circumstances surrounding his death are proving he had something to be afraid of, PRIOR to his mifesto and killing spree: The unlawful sanction of unwarranted public violence as committed by LAPD (shooting 3 unarmed civilians in their 'pursuit' of the suspect, who was not present at either scene), and potentially the actions of other law enforcement in trying to cover for officer's complicity in the deliberate murder of a suspect, whom has YET to be positively identified as Dorner.

These are crimes of State-sanctioned violence against the general populace. As such, they're also much larger and far more dangerous to the average citizen than the entire supposed "Benghazzi scandal", of which many conservatives in Congress still have their "panties tied up in a wad" about, which has absolutely nothing to do with abuse of police power whatsoever (more likely "the lack of adequate police power", due entirely to lack of adequate Embassy funding).

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yabbadoody
Joined:
Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

I'm saying it is just as likely that Dorner was going to kill himself anyway after being cornered anywhere. The shooting of innocents is a separate issue. Like I said, use your indignation energy for the shooting of unarmed civilians.

DynoDon
Joined:
Jun. 29, 2012 9:24 am

I find black humor in the fact that, after all the police, SWAT, FBI searching for days, it was Fish & Game wardens that spotted him. And he was hiding close to the police command center. There's some law enforcement ineptness maybe.

DynoDon
Joined:
Jun. 29, 2012 9:24 am

To be precise, I haven't characterized anything as 'racist' except perhaps LAPD guniing down two Latino women in a supposed case of 'mistaken identity'. Those incidents are going to cost the department BIG - I'd like to be present when the defending attorney attempts to explain this 'mishap' (unarmed persons nearly died from police gunshot wounds) in civil court.

Again to be precise, I've drawn the COMPARISON to Dorner's being burned alive, by incident accounts WITH COORDINATION AND APPARENT INTENT of law enforcement officers present, with the Southern American practice of Lynching.

Lynching was not simply the act of a mob hanging a black man or child from a tree. More often than not, mobs were "recruited" from the citizenry under false charges, with victims being forcibly located and then burned and beaten before or after being hung, the citizen-assailants responsible taking their crimes in no particular order.

The most recent incident of a 'textbook' lynching appears to have occured in 2003, perhaps as part of a rash of such recent racial killings in Springfield, Missouri.

As for the involvement of other law enforcement agencies:

1. Dorner was located outside the jurisdiction of LAPD, thereby requiring presence of other jurisdictional officers (US Marshall, .

2. LAPD would most certainly have been intimately involved in Dorner's (suspect's) approach and apprehension at this point through back-channel communication between commanders, as best anybody can tell.

3. Using cover of other agencies and personnel, one would expect LAPD to maneuver any apprehension of suspect (Dorner) toward a 'fatal resolution' at the scene, but especially so if they did not want Dorner's testimony on the record in open court.

What we may now have is evidence of good cops (other agencies) filing accurate reports with press, later having need to cover for bad-faith actions by other officers (those seeking to execute Dorner/suspect without trial, for alleged crimes) due to their involvement in Dorner/suspect's apprehension. Yes, it's very messy.

yabbadoody's picture
yabbadoody
Joined:
Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

Haditha, 2005: American Marines executed 24 civilians and burned the bodies to cover evidence.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/americas/2012/01/2012123204949434335.html

No one was punished.

The same tactics are seen here on American soil. Kill the suspect, regardless of if they're the right person or not. If it is the right person, then chalk it up as a victory for justice. If it's the wrong person, as in the case of the women riddled with bullets by LAPD because they were driving a blue truck, then there's no punishment because "shit happens" and everyone just goes about their business. The actual rule of law be damned.

And then the corporate-owned media will attempt to clean it all up with uninformed pundits telling moronic voters what to think. The crimes of state can be dismissed, or easily spun so that voters not only accept the grotesque injustices but actually defend them, as we see here from comments like, "Dorner got what he deserved."

This doesn't mean that Dorner was right, but simply that the LAPD is wrong.

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JTaylor
Joined:
Mar. 19, 2012 1:04 pm

yabbadoody, you sure use a lot of assumptions, conjecture, and downright untruths to support the idolization of your murderous hero. Mayhap, if you reserved your righteous indignation for true victims of police actions, you might get a sympathetic ear. Right now, we just see a sad poster, who adores a sad murderer.

Just to help you fill in the rhetoric. When the police kill someone who is shooting at them, it is not murder. You may want to bing the term "justifiable homicide" before you dig the Dorner's altar any deeper. Of course, we have no proof that the police killed him; but just in case you have time to ponder.

Paleo-con
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

If I'm making assumptions, then I'd like for someone - anyone - to point out a SINGLE incident in the United States, in recent memory, where a WHITE former Police Officer could have ALLEGEDLY been burned to death in an intentional act by other active duty Police Officers, wherein there is any incidental corroborating evidence to that allegation whatsoever. So yes - for just a moment, we'll agree to PRETEND that LAPD didn't nearly assissinate 3 innocent bystanders in their futile, widespread, and extremely violent (all court admissable evidence of revenge) search for Christopher Dorner.

Now on the OTHER hand, it very EASY for me or anyone else to point to recent references - VERY recent references - of White/Anglo officers shooting former police/law enforcement officers, whom were also former military, where the victim in those crimes is an African American.

NOW - to that informaton, let's consider that African Americans make up approximately 13 percent of the entire US population. Therefore, for every ONE such incident of a "wilding" officer like Dorner, one would expect to find 3 or 4 references to similar style law enforcement apprehensions for non-African American officers. And yet overwhelmingly, whenever an officer is shot by other officers whom happens to be non-white, American journalists and "internal law enforcement investigations" OVERWHELMINGLY "turn a blind eye" to the potential of obvious racial offense.

I'm waiting, so please be sure to cite evidence and links to corroborating information.

yabbadoody's picture
yabbadoody
Joined:
Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am

Paleo: For the record, officers specifically do NOT have any legal or lawful right WHATSOEVER to shoot unarmed assailants when those assailants are seen or reasonably believed to be "in the process of peaceable surrender", as appears to have happened with Dorner (shortly after law enforcement started the fire which destroyed the cabin he was in), as initially reported to CNN by a US Marshall District Supervisor.

No legal justification, whatsoever. None exists in international law either.

JT: For every incident of an unpunished military misconduct like this that you can find, a reasonable search of available military prosecutions will turn up perhaps a half-dozen successful prosecutions of execution-style killings or wrongful civilian deaths via military personnel, leading to extended prison sentences for those found responsible, often for entire platoons or patrols.

However inefficient the process, I can guarantee you that the military has no desire to LOSE the hearts and minds of those they seek to control by force, simply because that only costs more American lives - and therefore will police itself to whatever ability allowed, given larger mission parameters and other factors.

OBVIOUS exception these days are killings reported due to drone strikes - now THERE we have a 'smoking gun', perhaps just the loophole certain types in the Pentagon have been looking for for years.

yabbadoody's picture
yabbadoody
Joined:
Dec. 27, 2012 11:37 am
Quote yabbadoody:[...]correction, the suspect (not yet identified as Dorner) was not ALLOWED to do so by law enforcement on the scene - who could've killed him easily at that point in time, had he posed further threat.[...]

There is absolutely no proof of that yet, just conflicting reports. I saw, I believe, the sherrif say that there were two seperate dispersions of gas, the last one pyrotechnic. Untill we find out the facts I am going to hold judgement.

As a trained law enforcement official he had to know that as soon as his cover was blown his chances of escape were almost nil. He could have surrendered to the owners of the cabin or to the man whose truck he hi-jacked and had witnesses to protect him. Instead he chose to run, to fight, and to kill another victim.

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mjolnir
Joined:
Mar. 3, 2011 11:42 am

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The world we're leaving for today's teens...

Without immediate global action on climate change, today's teenagers will be forced to live with the consequences of our inaction. The World Bank has issued their third report of climate change, and it says that global temperatures could rise by as much as 4 degrees Celsius by the time today's teens hit their 80th birthday.

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