The republicans are trying all that they can to capitalize on the political heat over the supreme court decision to uphold the Affordable care and patient protection act. Many right wing governors, such as Scott Walker and Rick Scott, have come out and said that they will not implement the law until after the November election. Mitt Romney continues to run against his own healthcare plan, and the House republicans are planning a vote to repeal the law, over the next few weeks. When the Supreme Court ruled that the so-called "mandate" is actually a tax, the republicans in the Senate saw this as their opportunity. Since tax laws cannot be filibustered in the Senate, the GOP would only need a 51 vote majority to repeal the bill. If they are able take control of the Senate in November, this is a real possibility. Of course, Mitt Romney would have to win the White House, or the bill would face a certain veto from President Obama. The real question though, is whether or not the GOP really wants to repeal this law. They are trying to capitalize on the anger throughout their base, over the passage of this bill. If they repeal the law, they will lose all of that clout in elections. Most likely, the health care debate will turnout very similar to the abortion issue. With a 5-4 conservative majority on the Supreme Court, the 5 conservative justices could conceivably ban all abortions tomorrow, if they wanted. They won’t do it because it is too hot of a campaign issue that will secure the votes of the religious right. So, is all of this just rhetoric? Time will tell, but we need to keep a Democratic Senate, a Democratic White House, and we need to take back the House of Representatives, just to be safe. www.civildiscoursepodcast.com

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GOP will Never Repeal ObamaCare

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When Eric Holder eventually steps down as Attorney General, he will leave behind a complicated legacy, some of it tragic, like his decision not to prosecute Wall Street after the financial crisis, and his all-out war on whistleblowers like Edward Snowden.