One of the big things of Tea Party candidates is to be opposed to the TARP bailout program of Wall St. institutions and of other banks. Muordock is a Tea Party extremist (running for the U.S. Senate in Indiana) and I read that he accepted campaign contributions from banks which have received federal bailout assistance. An Indiana state trooper has asked the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to investigate Muordocks financial ties to the financial services industry in connection with "pay-to-play" and Muordocks role as state treasurer in which he expressed interest in managing a state police pension fund of some kind. A small number of Republicans in the state including the head of a manufacturing firm have come out for the Democratic opponent, Joe Donnelly, saying that he would be a more positive representative for Indiana in the Senate, and that Muordock is too extreme with his statement that he would not compromise with Democrats.

In the meantime, Illinois Tea Party U.S. Representative Joe Walsh was caught on video making offense statements about African-Americans, Latinos, Democrats, and the Rev. Jesse Jackson. His opponent, Tammey Duckworth, had her campaign manager issue a statement condemning Walsh's comments as being offense, and that the district deserves better.

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