I just received the below email, stating that I have now become a CYBERBULLY.

Carolyn,

The best way to know that we're having an impact? When our opponents lash out at us. And boy did they ever.

Politico wrote an article that highlights some of the work we've done in opposition to CISPA -- including our campaign to call Mark Zuckerberg out on lining up Facebook in support of the bill:

Facebook, IBM and other firms — along with lawmakers — have been targeted this week in attacks on Twitter and Facebook, via email and online petitions.

What do the powers-that-be think of our grassroots activism?

“Cyberbullying,” one tech company insider dubbed it.

Right on. We want to be free to 'bully' mega corporations and politicians whenever they deserve it. And your donations keep us independent and make it possible for us to do so.

We haven't won yet, but they're calling us cyberbullies because we're having a tangible impact on the workings on Capitol Hill.

We're making it harder for big businesses to push a pro-corporate, anti-Internet, anti-consumer agenda.

Over the last month alone we've generated more than 300,000 emails to Congress, nearly 200,000 signatures on our open letter to Facebook, and more than 15,000 phone calls to lawmakers.

And we've seen tangible results:

  • Amendments were adopted that made CISPA (marginally) better.
  • Earlier this month CISPA was supposed to sail through, but we helped foment real opposition, and the House vote was far closer than anybody could have imagined even a couple of weeks ago.
  • Most Democrats held firm in opposition, and more than two dozen libertarian-leaning Republicans defied their leadership and vote no.

Thanks so much for your support!

-Demand Progress

~~~~~~~~~~~~

THEY'RE STILL AT IT... The wanton desire, by the greedy few, to sabotage Internet creativity is still going and going like the Energizer Bunny. I hope we, who use the Internet for creating and viewing and learning and interaction with other Internet entities will have a voice in President Obama to stop this new threat upon our civil liberties in the guise of protecting us. Hmmm, again, where have I heard that before? Please tell President Obama to stand strong against the new SOPA bill called CISPA... http://act.demandprogress.org/sign/obama_cispa/ thinkingblue

CISPA by any other name would smell as SOPA

CISPA has garnered favor from corporations and lobbying groups such as Microsoft, Facebook and the United States Chamber of Commerce, which look on it as a simple and effective means of sharing important cyber threat information with the government. CISPA has been criticized by advocates of internet privacy and civil liberties, such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the American Civil Liberties Union, and Avaaz.org. Those groups argue CISPA contains too few limits on how and when the government may monitor private individual’s internet browsing information. Additionally, they fear that such new powers could be used to surveil the general public rather than to pursue malicious hackers.

Some critics saw CISPA as a second attempt at strengthing digital piracy laws after the anti-piracy Stop Online Piracy Act became deeply unpopular. Intellectual property theft was initially listed in the bill as a possible cause for sharing web traffic information with the government, though it was removed in subsequent drafts.

The legislation was introduced on November 30, 2011 by U.S. Representative Michael Rogers (R-MI) and 111 co-sponsors. It was passed in the House of Representatives on April 26, 2012.[9] President Obama has argued that the bill lacks confidentiality and civil liberties safeguards and has threatened to veto it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyber_Intelligence_Sharing_and_Protection_Act

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Are You A Cyberbully?

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