Spin ding...

I think that people lost their jobs because of downsizing (not enough money circulating in the system), not because of government spending (Mrs. sad ad lady). Did the people Mayor Booker fired lose their pensions and benefit eligibility, or were they disallowed from bargaining with management, as was often Mr. Romney's modus operandi? Wealth extracted from commerce (but not "confidently" re-invested), resulting in "contraction" (job loss), and the retraction of public services and sureties have "depressed" us most, I feel, not government spending. If I happen upon more sedate discussions of some fundamentalist/libertarian utopia, where "market forces" prevail, everyone plays nice, no standards are necessary, and the bravest profit most, and I will become 'nauseated' myself. Some fairly smart 18th century thinkers decided that protecting and promoting the general welfare and regulating national commerce were good reasons to establish a government. Lawless markets are not merely "free" to operate but permitted to do damage. It is not an indictment of business in general to point out that we should avoid the arrant damage that some private interests can do to working communities, but it is important to consider whether such hazardous business models as they represent are sufficient for "good governance" (in general).

Smack Talk...

It is not the President who is "scary" (after four years in office), as some moneyed reviewers will still shamelessly see him, but the presumed gullibility of the electorate and the time and treasure spent responding to (debunking) unworthy political oppositeness to "common sense" that frightens me. It is not the anti-colonial influences the younger Mr. Obama might have considered (back in the day) that we should discuss but, rather, the oligarchy of conglomerate influences on our politics that we must confront now.

Capital Gains...

hire Senators like Elizabeth Warren. speculative trading taxation. infrastructure investment. restoration of civil and voter rights. comprehensive immigration reform. "triggered" budgeting (for "market confidence"). restraint/regulation of systemic risks of new models of financial engineering. waste-fraud riddance and funding reform (higher SSI cap?) of entitlements. CAMPAIGN FINANCE REFORM (lol).

we have already bailed our banks out (unlike Euro-zone has yet been able to do with 17 countries and weaker/different currencies) remember

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Who Should an Economy Serve?

The top one percent own half of all the world's assets. In stark contrast, the bottom fifty percent of the world owns less than one percent. According to the 2014 Global Wealth Report from Credit Suisse, global inequality has surged since the 2008 financial collapse. The report explains that while global wealth has more than doubled since the year 2000, the vast majority of overall growth has gone to those who were already wealthy.