ADHD Symptoms May Decline From One Grade to Next, Duke Study Finds

On July 23, 2016, we discontinued our forums. We ask our members to please join us in our new community site, The Hartmann Report. Please note that you will have to register a new account on The Hartmann Report.

3 posts / 0 new

Many elementary-aged children with clinically elevated attention problems in one grade no longer demonstrate these problems the following year in their new classroom, according to a study led by researchers at Duke University.


The findings underscore the importance of annually reevaluating children diagnosed with attention disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to avoid treating them for problems at school that may no longer be evident, said David Rabiner, lead author of the study and a faculty member in Duke’s Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and Center for Child and Family Policy.


The research, published online March 17 in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (http://journals.lww.com/jrnldbp/Abstract/publishahead/Instability_in_Teacher_Ratings_of_Children_s.99910.aspx), looked at three independent samples of elementary school children. Two samples – 27 first-graders and 24 fourth-graders, respectively -- consisted of children rated as highly inattentive by their teacher but who did not have a formal ADHD diagnosis. The third sample consisted of 28 children in grades first through fourth who had been diagnosed with ADHD.



More

SueN's picture
SueN
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Comments

What about from one teacher to the next?

bonnie
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

It could be the curriculum, too - maybe there is more activity in the next year.

Or if they are measured at the end of one year and the start of the next, then the novelty of the new year may not have worn off.

essemenne's picture
essemenne
Joined:
Mar. 18, 2010 6:43 am

What Do Democrats Really Want?

Thom plus logo Thomas Friedman, the confused billionaire, told us decades ago that "free trade" is what made the Lexus a successful product when, in fact, it was decades of Japanese government subsidies and explicit tariffs that did so.
Powered by Pressflow, an open source content management system