July 11-13: At Netroots Nation

The Hidden History of Guns and the 2nd Amendment Book Tour Is Coming...

Thursday, June 6: NEW YORK, NY 7:30pm

Location: The Strand (2nd floor), 828 Broadway, NYC

Monday, June 10: WASHINGTON, DC 6:30pm

Location: Busboys and Poets, 450 K St NW, Washington, DC

Wednesday, June 12: PORTLAND, OR 7:30pm

Location: Powell’s, 1005 W Burnside St., Portland

Sunday, June 23: SEATTLE, WA 7:30pm

Location: Town Hall, 1119 8th Ave, Seattle (West Entrance) w/Elliott Bay Book Company

Tuesday, June 25: SAN FRANCISCO, CA 7:00pm

Location: First Church, 2345 Channing Way, Berkeley w/The Booksmith

Friday, June 28: CHICAGO, IL 7:00pm

Location: Frugal Muse, 7511 Lemont Rd. #146 (Chestnut Court Shopping Center), Darien

Saturday, June 29: MINNEAPOLIS, MN 7:00pm

Location: Common Good Books, 38 S. Snelling Ave, St. Paul

Friday, July 12: Philadelphia, PA 4:15pm - At Netroots Nation
Location: PA Convention Center, 1101 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA

Become a Thom Supporter- Click the Patreon button

Grammar Question

On July 23, 2016, we discontinued our forums. We ask our members to please join us in our new community site, The Hartmann Report. Please note that you will have to register a new account on The Hartmann Report.

4 posts / 0 new

I'm not picking nits- I just have great deal of curiosity when it comes to grammar. The description of the Domestic US Politics forum (Discussion of US politics and their world impact.) seems awkward. I think its the use of "their" Anyone know if that grammar is correct? Would "its" be better grammatically?(Discussion of US politics and its world impact.)

Just wondering.

stwo's picture
stwo
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Comments

This is one of the real nits that gets picked. Agreement in case and gender makes it very awkward to always say "his or hers" instead of "its" or "theirs." In this case I would have said "its" because because politics is a reference to the whole and not its variety.

We miss the late James J. Kilpatrick whose writers' column was always a joy about the wordsmith's palette. The loss of fine tones and notes is a major problem. The misuse of "socialism" is an example of what happens when words don't mean anything except the emotion and intention of the speaker. It would be good to have more accuracy in insults. Shoot better rhetorical arrows.

"Very unique" is my pet peeve. One is enough and only. Rare is another thing.

The best advice he gave was to use your ear in writing. Getting the grammar right is good if it helps you be clear and precise. But getting the rhythm and cadence right makes prose easy to read and gets the music of the language into the art of writing. In other words, write. Use the tools of the language because you want to say something you care about, and if you care about it, say it well. There really aren't any other rules that matter.

DRC's picture
DRC
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

http://sat.collegeboard.com/practice/sat-question-of-the-day?src=R   * is a collegeboard admissions test question, SAT everyday. It's on my home startup page, just to get my dendrites and synapses coordinated before the really serious stuff like fox or wwwrestling.

http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/   is an excellent source, she writes for NYT and did respond personally to a question I e-mailed to her. It is a good source and took her "Woe is I Junior" to my daughter's class in English and Geography when I did my presentation last week

* btw, I usually get them right, I did this one

douglaslee's picture
douglaslee
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

I'm with you on very unique. Also very top, very most, very bottom...

Nice links douglaslee, thanks.

stwo's picture
stwo
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

How our republic could die in the age of Trump - in a stunning parallel to the fall of Rome

Thom plus logo The American republic could die, just like Rome. Wavering for some time on the verge of becoming a complete oligarchy, America is on the verge of flipping from a democratic republic to a strongman or autocratic form of government, something that's happened to dozens of democracies in the past few decades, but never before here.
Powered by Pressflow, an open source content management system