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US can become world's biggest oil producer in a decade, says IEA

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11 posts / 0 new

Maybe we have more oil than the Cassandra's fear?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/nov/12/us-biggest-oil-producer

stuff's picture
stuff
Joined:
Nov. 24, 2012 4:59 pm

Comments

In the long run, it will take more oil energy to repair the environmental damage than we obtain from those sources...and it takes more oil energy to get oil energy from unconventional sources than it does from conventional wells. Over time, it's a losing proposition. In the short term, pretty profitable...and kicks the energy problem down the road a bit.

It's great to have oil to run autos. Not so great not having water to quench our thirst.

There are a lot of trade-offs if you don't want to use more oil energy to repair the damage than is obtained from the unconventional sources.

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

polycarp2
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm
Maybe we have more oil than the Cassandra's fear?

Dude I'm trying really hard not to peg you as a troll. But ya gots to give me something to work with. This SOS fossil fool bait and switch maintaining dysfunction selling non renewable. Hydrocarbons or Carbohydrates. OPEC or Family Farms. Outsourcing or Locally grown. Oil Wars or Peace. Biodegradable or 90k years. Same with the Monsanto poisons and frankenfuds verses organic. Step farming, compost toilets producing methane. Not another version of acid rain and dioxins. There is nothing wrong with making a buck unless it makes people sick or dead in the process. Most of the imported crud oil we use goes to plastic crap and packaging we could easily replace with veggie cellulose. Or buy bulk and bring your own bag. Hemp is 75% cellulose, 2/3rds more than clear-cutting trees. Last I heard there was 5 ways to produce electricity and many ways to rotate generators without fossil fools. Wind, solar, magnetism, waves and rapids without damns can power communities without the status weird trade orchestrations outsourcing our jobs and taxes the norquester bogeymen never whimper about. Feliz Navidad

Lotus Goes Green with Hemp Car * Hempcar.org * Hemp Corporatism.jpg

Internal Combustion: How Corporations and Governments
Addicted the World to Oil and Derailed the Alternatives.

ENERGY CRISIS: Ford And Diesel Never Intended Cars To Use Gasoline
Henry Ford's first Model-T was built to run on hemp gasoline and the CAR ITSELF WAS CONSTRUCTED FROM HEMP! On his large estate, Ford was photographed among his hemp fields. The car, 'grown from the soil,' had hemp plastic panels whose impact strength was 10 times stronger than steel; Popular Mechanics, 1941.

Did the early cars run on peanut oil?
You're absolutely right -- the first engines that were developed did run on vegetable oils. In fact, when Rudolf Diesel designed his prototype diesel engine a century ago, his fuel of choice was peanut oil. However, when petroleum diesel fuel arrived in the market, it was cheap, reasonably efficient and readily available, and, therefore, quickly replaced vegetable oils as fuel. For more, see

Henry Ford and George Washington Carver were good friends and I do recall watching something on I believe the History Channel about them trying to work on a car ran off of peanut oil however I do not recall if they were successful.

GoogleFuelJosh-Tickell

Los Angeles Times Review Friday, February 13
"Fuel is a vital, superbly assembled documentary…doesn't dwell on muckraking, however; it's more focused on broadly inspiring viewers than preaching to the converted….Smartly animated interstitials, memorable archival material and a lively soundtrack round out the fast-paced proceedings."
thefuelfilm.com

Fields of Fuel: Josh Tickell's New Biodiesel Documentary

Will Bolivia Be Ruined or Improved Because of Electric Cars?

THE HUMANIST INTERVIEW with Josh Tickell

Mr. Biodiesel Meets Gas 2.0
If a picture is worth a thousand words,
a good documentary can change your vocabulary.

Hemplastic or Fossil Fools Crud

Hydrocarbons vs Carbohydrates: The Future of Plastics hempfarm
Vegetable matter and minerals have competed with each other to become the dominant industrial input for almost 200 years. For the first 150 years, significant advances occurred in the use of both types of material. Then, for a quarter of a century after World War II, hydrocarbons took over almost completely but since the 1980s, carbohydrate-derived industrial products have been sweeping back as a result of technological and political developments.

Welcome to Hemp Plastic

Stanford, IBM getting closer to 'green' plastic

Hemphasis.net ~ Hemp Plastics hemphasis
The basic building block of plastics is cellulose taken from petroleum, but toxic petrochemical compositions are not the only way to derive plastics. Plastics can be derived from plant cellulose, and since hemp is the greatest cellulose producer on Earth (hemp hurds can be 85% cellulose), it only makes sense to make non-toxic, biodegradable plastic from hemp and other organics,

Hemp Plastic google

What Is Hemp Plastic? hempplastic
An affordable bio based natural fibre composite to replace oil based raw materials.
Designed in Europe over 15 years and now produced in China, Hemp Plastics compete with engineering compounds in properties such as stiffness and high heat tolerance (HDT). Both biodegradable and recyclable blends address global policies for CO2 reduction and oil dependence. Hemp plastics are not made from hemp oil or hemp seeds, but from the stalk.

Hemp Plastic hempowered

Henry Ford was fond of saying, "Why use up the forests which were centuries in the making and the mines which required ages to lay down if we can get the equivalent of forests and mineral products from the annual growth of the fields?"

George Washington Carver had a response: "I believe that the great Creator has put ores and oil on this earth to give us a breathing spell. As we exhaust our finite resources, we must be prepared to fall back on our farms, which is Gods true storehouse and can never be exhausted. We can learn to synthesize material for every human need from things that grow."

That "breathing spell" ended 60 years ago when Henry Ford built his car. Since then, we have cut down half of the worlds forests, a primary source of clean air. Only 3 percent of the U.S. original forests still remain. Much of Australia's old-growth forests are being cut down for wood chips. If we dont start using hemp to help build our societies, what will we use?

Biodegradable Hemp Plastic raw material pellets for injection moulding may be found at hempplastic.com

The Hemp Plastics Industry book
Learn detailed information about the hemp plastics industry

If you want to be the first to learn about new products - join the free HEMP BLOG. This is where we first announced products such as Hemp Plastic Surf Fins and eco iPhone cases made from plants!

HEMP FACTS hempstores
Eco-friendly hemp can replace most toxic petro-chemical products. Research is being done to use hemp in manufacturing biodegradable plastic products: plant-based cellophane, recycled plastic mixed with hemp for injection-molded products, and resins made from the oil, to name just a very few examples.

Toxic Garbage Island U2b

Quantifying Plastic Junk In The Atlantic Oceanlinks
Large amounts of plastic garbage afloat in the ocean east of Bermuda

Toxic Soup of Plastic Debris, Twice the Size of US
It is twice the size of the continental United States, yet you cannot set foot on it. Scientists have named it "Plastic Soup", and appropriately so. Floating in the Northern Pacific Ocean lays a huge expanse of plastic refuse. This garbage patch is actually two attached areas on either side of Hawaii, known as the Western and Eastern Pacific Garbage Patches.

Message in a Bottle
Seabirds are starving with bellies full of trash. Fur seals in New Zealand poop shards of yellow and blue. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is twice the size of Texas. Now the bad news: Plastic never goes away, and scientists are finding that it absorbs toxins with spongelike efficiency. The fix? Cut it off at the source.

Toxic: Garbage Island - Part 1

Giant garbage patch floating in Pacific
Chris Parry with the California Coastal Commission in San Francisco said the so-called Great Pacific Garbage Patch, has been growing a brisk rate since the 1950s, The San Francisco Chronicle reported Friday.

An enormous island of trash twice the size of Texas is floating in the Pacific Ocean You may have heard of the plastic trash vortex in the North Pacific Ocean

Chevron’s SF Bay oil refinery fire v Hemp
☛Poor Community Still Sickened by Chevron Refinery Fire
☛Chevron’s Dirty Legacy Felt from Brazil to the Bay Area
☛Navy Ship Crashes Into Oil Tanker
☛Chevron subpoenas non-profit for defending the Rainforest

Peek or Peekaboo - Crude Oil Still Sucks

Why Do YOU Think They Call it DOPE?
☛Cannabis Hemp: The Invisible Prohibition Revealed
☛The Elkhorn Manifesto
☛Marijuana and Hemp: The Untold Story
☛The Nation of Apathetic Puppets By John Pilger
☛Maintaining Dysfunction

Al Capone and Watergate were red herrings
to divert the countries attention from the
Fascist acts of eliminating competition.
Booze/Ethanol or Ganja//Hemp.

DdC's picture
DdC
Joined:
Mar. 22, 2012 1:39 am

Probably since droughts alternating with flooding are on the horizon with global warming, we shouldn't be using our agricultural lands to grow bio-fuels. Starving-to-death with a full fuel tank isn't a very wise trade-off. There are many valid reasons to grow hemp. Bio-fuels aren't one of them.

The consumption society has pretty much reached the end of its consuming rope. Attempting to maintain it until its bitter end will make the end even more bitter.

I do realize that market economic systems require the attempt in order to avoid collapse. Growth in consumption is shouted daily by its cheering fans. More jobs producing more stuff. The planet says no.

Probably at this point in history, a re-assessment of society and cherished, shared beliefs is in order. Societies that didn't do that when faced with an environmental break-down disappeared with a very bitter ending.

I sometimes wonder what Easter Islanders were thinking when they chopped down the last tree for a bigger house. They maintained their way of life to the end. An ever bigger wooden house was a cherished status.....and they sealed their own extinction. They were unwittingly building their tombs.

What were they thinking when they chopped down the last tree? Their last future fishing boat to obtain food. Their last means to repair a roof or cook a meal.

The merging of an economic, resource and environmental collapse is never pretty though they can often be avoided with a societal re-assessment of values, shared beliefs, and how the society has to function. Such things are rare in human history. History is filled with the graveyards of societies that refused to do it.

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

polycarp2
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Poly, not to go all Hemp-ey and Green on you, but different agricultural products require differing types of soil and water. The good thing about hemp, saw grass and switch grass are they are easy to grow, require little care, no pesticides, and little fertilizer. The same is true about the difference between the "costs of meat/ beef" that Vegetarians like to cite, how cattle need soooo much corn (4 times what a person would get from the same corn), and how it uses so much land. Except the cattle corn they are fed yields 16 -25 times what the sweet corn yield is, so we actually gain a huge surplus of savings from cattle and beef. AND much of the land we grow the cattle on has no other agricultural use. Western pastures will only support cattle, deer and antelope, without someone discovering a cheap way of getting a massive amount of water to the desert.

The same is true for hemp. The stuff grows like a weed. Ask the highway dept workers in Indiana, Illinois and Iowa. Or any farmer in those areas who had a teenager living on their farm over the last 70 years. One seed hits the soil, and you got a hemp farm.

If we gave the wsame incentives to hemp that petrol/ gasoline receives, we wouldn't use petrol for long, because the economics would never support it. On an even field it is far cheaper to grow weed locally, process it into fuel than it is to occupy the Middle East, support 4 carrier groups, suppress Islam, maintain a perpetual war with brown skinned people who had the nerve to be born on our oil, and then pump it out of the ground, transport it across the planet, process the petrol and deal with the massive oil spills, pollution and brown fields.

Phaedrus76's picture
Phaedrus76
Joined:
Sep. 14, 2010 8:21 pm

I've no doubt the grain farms of Indiana, Iowa and Illinois can be converted into hemp farms.

Keep in mind that the immense agricultural valleys of Calif. are in decline. Global warming = less river flow for required irrigation, smaller melting snowpacks, less rainfall. Erase the farms. That's currently in process. Rainfall isn't adequate even for hemp without the disappearing irrigation.

Same problem in the Colo. Basin of the southwest where agriculture is reliant upon irrigation. Erase the farms. Erase the possibility of hemp as well.

Probably hemp should replace cotton as a clothing source. Grow hemp in lower rainfall areas, and food crops where we now grow cotton.

The U.S. is losing agricultural lands. Re-occurring droughts will put a strain on the nations ability to feed itself with remaining agricultural areas.. That's just the way it is. Plantings are up...food reserves are down.

It's assumed that current marginal lands will continue receiving adequate rainfall to grow hemp indefinately into the future. Considering they border drought-stricken agricultural areas, that probably isn't very likely.

Address global warming, and hemp as fuel is a possibility. Agricultural areas would stabilize. We'd know where we could grow things and where we couldn't. Remaining agricultural areas will stabilize when it peaks. New ones may come into being

Keep in mind that if emissions were totally stopped tomorrow, the globe will continue to warm from what's already been set in motion. About all we can do at this point is prevent the final outcome of global warming from being worse than it already will be. We don't even seem to be doing that.

If you'd rather drive a car than eat, go for it. Easter Islanders chose bigger houses...rather than sustaining trees to provide boats for fishing. Same outcome. Starvation. A tomb, whether an auto or a large house is still a tomb.

Like every collapsed society before us, we seem intent on maintaining unsustainability until the very end. The nation will probably break up into much smaller entities with reciprocal economic systems rather than the market system that replaced them for the most part through force.

The market system has had a pretty long run, and in itself, isn't sustainable. It requires ever growing consumption and rising populations. Growth. The planet says no.

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

polycarp2
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm
Dude I'm trying really hard not to peg you as a troll. But ya gots to give me something to work with.

I think the article I posted speaks for itself. I didn't make that up.

stuff's picture
stuff
Joined:
Nov. 24, 2012 4:59 pm

ke more oil energy to repair the environmental damage than we obtain from those sources...and it takes more oil energy to get oil energy from unconventional sources than it does from conventional wells. Over time, it's a losing proposition. In the short term, pretty profitab - See more at: http://www.thomhartmann.com/forum/2012/11/us-can-become-worlds-biggest-oil-producer-decade-says-iea#sthash.x7UabAyS.dpuf

_________

husnain's picture
husnain
Joined:
Oct. 23, 2014 12:10 am

Dude I'm trying really hard not to peg you as a troll. But ya gots to give me something to work with. This SOS fossil fool bait and switch maintaining dysfunction selling non renewable. Hydrocarbons or Carbohydrates. OPEC or Family Farms. Outsourcing or Locally grown. Oil Wars or Peace. Biodegradable or 90k years. Same with the Monsanto poisons and frankenfuds verses organic. - See more at: http://www.thomhartmann.com/forum/2012/11/us-can-become-worlds-biggest-oil-producer-decade-says-iea#sthash.ulnHe020.dpuf

____________________

ahsan

breetlee6666's picture
breetlee6666
Joined:
Feb. 23, 2015 9:57 pm
Quote polycarp2:

Probably since droughts alternating with flooding are on the horizon with global warming, we shouldn't be using our agricultural lands to grow bio-fuels. Starving-to-death with a full fuel tank isn't a very wise trade-off. There are many valid reasons to grow hemp. Bio-fuels aren't one of them.

The consumption society has pretty much reached the end of its consuming rope. Attempting to maintain it until its bitter end will make the end even more bitter.

I do realize that market economic systems require the attempt in order to avoid collapse. Growth in consumption is shouted daily by its cheering fans. More jobs producing more stuff. The planet says no.

Probably at this point in history, a re-assessment of society and cherished, shared beliefs is in order. Societies that didn't do that when faced with an environmental break-down disappeared with a very bitter ending.

I sometimes wonder what Easter Islanders were thinking when they chopped down the last tree for a bigger house. They maintained their way of life to the end. An ever bigger wooden house was a cherished status.....and they sealed their own extinction. They were unwittingly building their tombs.

What were they thinking when they chopped down the last tree? Their last future fishing boat to obtain food. Their last means to repair a roof or cook a meal.

The merging of an economic, resource and environmental collapse is never pretty though they can often be avoided with a societal re-assessment of values, shared beliefs, and how the society has to function. Such things are rare in human history. History is filled with the graveyards of societies that refused to do it.

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

Your right, growing corn to make gasoline out of it does not make sense. And even if it did, when you run the calculations you could plant the entire midwest of the US in corn, convert it all to gasoline and not make that much of a dent in worldwide oil consumption. But you would put a hell of a strain on the food supply.

Bottom line, you have to reduce the demand for oil. Considering that you have to burn hydrocarbons of some sort to get cars, trucks, trains and airplanes to move, I don't see what is going to cause the demand for oil to go down. You simply cannot make enough Teslas to make a significant difference. And the world's population keeps growing, it has more than doubled in the last 100 years. And oil consumption keeps creeping up 1% a year because of it.

I am not as "gloom and doom" about the situation as some on this board, but time will tell.

Mauiman2's picture
Mauiman2
Joined:
Jul. 27, 2012 7:24 am

the u.s. will never be the largest producer in the world again. er/ei plus technically recoverable vs economically recoverable will determine otherwise. a fracked well produces far less than standard production. we are working on the high branches since the low hanging fruit is gone. production will be come increasinglly expensive and dangerous both environmemtally and physically as in off continental shelf or arctic drilling. plus the reserve numbers are always skewed. theamount for instance in bakken shale vs the amount in bakken recoverable are of an order of magnitude different. instead of seeking changes to the political economy which can deal with the issue of the collapse of the hydrocarbon bubble we seek ways to prolong it.

that is foolishness in the first degree.

big bird's picture
big bird
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Here's what the feud and reconciliation between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson can teach us about civility

Thom plus logo Donald Trump did not invent the art of the political insult but he's inflamed the level of vitriolic public discourse and incivility to a new low unmatched by other presidents. In a tainted tradition that has permeated our history, other presidents have not been immune to dishing out acerbic insults against one another.
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