Art

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Paul?

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douglaslee
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-tree-houses-fairy-tale-castles-in-the-air scroll halfway down to the Swedish one, a way to assimilate with evergreen and deciduous.

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hive-inn-ova-studio is cool, too. The units, if interiors are weight balanced [bathrooms and kitchinettes on the plug in side], could achieve amazing cantilevered opportunties with corresponding decks and balconies, covered and/or open.

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Shipping containers are popular with the prepper crowd, for use as an inexpensive underground bunker. They also make for secure storage of tools and material on construction sites, as well as mobile offices. Some in the tiny house movement have opted to use them as domiciles. I’m curious as to how they would fare in a tornado, although the addition of windows and doors could possibly weaken them if not properly installed.

Some nice tree houses in that link. They must use a really long squeegee to clean that one in Sweden. It had never dawned on me that mirrors could be used for camouflage. duh!

Would you be willing to swing with these swingers in Ecuador? http://www.odditycentral.com/travel/riding-a-swing-on-the-edge-of-a-cliff-in-ecuador.html

No respectable tree house would be without an elevator. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5FSWkjFPxs

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Google poses a question for prospective employees. "If you could stand on a tight wire anyplace in the world, where would you put it?" I thought for first pick the rainforest canopy about 8 feet down from the tree tops so it spans the living species examples underneath the tree tops but offers views of life below the trees as well, and the floor of the rainforest with untrammeled mulch would be a part of the experience. There ought to be a way to get the tree tops too.

For second choice I thought maybe a wire running across the Marianna trench in the Pacific. Since the question assumes I could stand on a tight wire when I can't, I could assume I could breath underwater at deep pressure when I can't.

My tree house was a drop site for a cherry bomb when I was growing up. I thought that would be safe because I wouldn't have to throw it and risk dropping it since gravity does the dropping and we were 10-12 feet up, with a hole in the wood board to drop it in. Those things are pretty powerful, and loud. The tree and tree house shook, and I could feel a force or vibration course through space around me. That was my first cherry bomb, and like the saying goes "You'll always remember your first something...bang?" No that was something else, I dunno. Treehouses are cool though.

That mirrored treehouse got me thinking. You know how birds fly into windows since they think the reflection is open sky [or some are suicidal]? I wonder if squirrels or chipmunks are as stupid and when jumping from branch to branch would make the same mistake and jump to the branch in the mirror. Of course if it was gathering nuts, the squirrel in the mirror would have a load of nuts too. Maybe squrrels and chipmunks mug other squirrels or chipmunks, I dunno. I know one type bird doesn't build it's own nests [Cuckoo I think], and lays it's eggs right next to other eggs already laid. Probably considered a job creator bird in the avian world. The other birds build the nests, then when the nest builders feed the cuckoo's chicklings they might be like nannies. Too lazy to do any work but always cuckooing the time, and loudly, like trump (he is kinda cuckoo himself, don't ya think?).

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Quote douglaslee:

Google poses a question for prospective employees. "If you could stand on a tight wire anyplace in the world, where would you put it?" I thought for first pick the rainforest canopy about 8 feet down from the tree tops so it spans the living species examples underneath the tree tops but offers views of life below the trees as well, and the floor of the rainforest with untrammeled mulch would be a part of the experience. There ought to be a way to get the tree tops too.

For second choice I thought maybe a wire running across the Marianna trench in the Pacific. Since the question assumes I could stand on a tight wire when I can't, I could assume I could breath underwater at deep pressure when I can't.

A kindred spirit?:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJ_fh-u4cR4

http://www.benhecht.com/GalleryMain.asp?GalleryID=122290&AKey=BCRVB3M7

Zenzoe
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The Powers of 10 offfers an examination of the sense of scale, from a human perspective.

Thanks for that link Zenzoe.

I am playing around with something called box art or box canvas, a frame with about 3" of depth that has real objects in the composition. My kid's baby shoes combined with pieces of their old toy trucks and cars make a a baby shoe car for each of them. One wheel is one of their old watches, the steering wheel is a Lego piece. Old table top hockey game figures fit on the road side in the distance. Like I said, I'm playing, and those baby shoes are cute. I have a pair of my wife's and even my own, the ones not bronzed (I think it was a 50s thing).

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Quote douglaslee:

The Powers of 10 offfers an examination of the sense of scale, from a human perspective?

Thanks for that link Zenzoe.

You're welcome. What did you think of his work and perspective?

Quote douglaslee:

I am playing around with something called box art or box canvas, a frame with about 3" of depth that has real objects in the composition. My kid's baby shoes combined with pieces of their old toy trucks and cars make a a baby shoe car for each of them. One wheel is one of their old watches, the steering wheel is a Lego piece. Old table top hockey game figures fit on the road side in the distance. Like I said, I'm playing, and those baby shoes are cute. I have a pair of my wife's and even my own, the ones not bronzed (I think it was a 50s thing).

Cool! Too bad we can't post pictures here. (or can we?) I'd like to see that.

I haven't done much with art boxes, but I get it. In school, I once took a long, skinny seed pod I'd found, one with a taupe-colored, velvety skin, and made a coffin for it. The coffin was lined with a similar-colored velvet, and, rather than using a long box with a lid, I took a block of wood and carved it out (then lined it), so that the seed pod was directly visible from the side view. I liked the relationship between the seed-pod's velvet and that of the "coffin;" also liked to honor such a death. My instructor had the nerve then to put it into one of the school art shows. How strange for me, when I happened to be standing near the exhibit, when I overheard a critical conversation about it between three other students who didn't know me: "Boy, that's creepy..." and so forth. I say strange, because it didn't bother me at all to hear their criticism. If people don't get your stuff, it's no skin off your nose, yes?

I am reminded as well of William Harnett's work. Of course, it only represents the idea of ordinary objects as art, in painting, but if you didn't know better, your eye would be fooled! (I love that horseshoe w/ little piece of paper.)

Zenzoe
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I liked the first gallery of natural materials and geologic pieces, then the last section by Dave Beck as well. The Beck updated Harnetts can even be done with a kitchen cabinett opened with seeming plates, glasses, and cups, and since it harkens to Warhol, the top shelf would have canned goods. A closet with door open woud work as well, hall closet with coats, hats and boots, or inline skates, and an umbrella. The eye fooling if done on the appropriate wall could look like a real window looking out at the car in the driveway, and for added panache, real blinds or verticals or curtains. I have seen paintings that look like photos, and others that look so real it's amazing. These -artworks-by-julian-beever/ are neat too. Using shadows on the images of kitchen plates or hanging coats makes them look realistic.

andy-warhol-and-the-art-of-screenprinting- was a different way to use silk screening with photos. Technically one could do their class picture this way.

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Fascinating video, douglaslee. On a scale of 1 to 10, I give it a 10. (puns inTENded)

Interesting answers to the Google question. When pressured, I was never good at answering hypothetical questions. A tight wire anywhere?.......that’s a good one. At one time, I would’ve probably answered with something like (A tight wire 1/4” above the sand at Daytona beach, during Spring break.) Now, I’d probably settle for something more subtle, such as (A tight wire over a spring fed pond located in a small meadow in the midst of a large forest, during Spring.)

Reading Swiss Family Robinson and watching the old Tarzan movies piqued my interest in tree houses. When I decided to build my own at about 9 years of age my dad wisely helped me to construct the ladder and deck, and then advised me on the wall and roof construction. The tree house was a cool place in which to read Hardy Boys books or a frontiersman biography, as well as providing a safe haven where I could occasionally ponder thru the pages of a girlie magazine.

I’d ride that swing in Ecuador, but only after discreetly inspecting it under the guise of me wanting to first check out the view from the tree house. I would investigate the anchoring of that cantilevered pipe which the swing is attached to, as well as the rest of the tree house. The construction looks somewhat questionable. Heck, the integrity of the tree itself looks questionable...............Pretty sweet piece of property though. What a view!

I don’t know if it’s considered art per say, but I like to use metal, and or wood to build usable items such as furniture and what not. (usable art?)

Zenzoe, Dave Beck’s work is cool. Like douglaslee’s box art, I’d consider it usable art. A way to display artifacts, mementos and such. At one time, I think I could’ve surpassed Dave Beck’s superstitious interpretation of Harnett's inverted horseshoe, by way of using my own speeding tickets. lol

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I forgot to thank you, Douglaslee, for the Powers of 10 video. I got goose bumps, big time. I showed it to my granddaughter, age 9. She liked it too.

I looked at the other Dave Becks too and found a few of them to be less successful than those on the first page. Anyway, I love those compositions with everyday objects. I once did a small painting of a torn and opened envelope, very realistically, yet painterly too, if you can imagine that; sadly enough, I've lost it somewhere, now that I think about it. Darn.

I once had a wonderful printmaking instructor (silk screen) —Walter Cotton— who gave us an assignment which included the instruction to use a "found object." We were supposed to wait until an object presented itself strongly, before choosing. This we would photograph, then insert that object's photo somewhere in our silkscreen composition. My find was a photograph my son, at age eight, had taken of the hole in the ground he'd produced by shooting an arrow into the soft earth. I then took his photo, placed it on the ground, then sprinkled grains of gravel here and there, making it look as though the gravel was cascading into the hole in Eric's photo; I photographed that and used it in my design, which became a photo taped against a wallpapered wall. For a title, I used a quote by Bugs Bunny: "We must preserve the sanctity of the American home." Ha ha.

Organican, sounds like you had quite a boy's wonderful childhood. You should go ahead and find those speeding tickets. That would be a fine addition to your art piece. :-)

Zenzoe
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Our speeding tickets are a photograph taken by the speedcam the moment you pass the camera at excessive speed. Very good photos really, of my wife. That kind of ticket coud be a signature for the painting. Anything with your name or picture on it could be the signature.

One cartoonist used to hide his name in the picture. One time it was elongated letters in the pleats of some drapes. I think it was New Yorker that published his work and this practice created a fan base hunting for his name in each piece. Contests among friends for who could find it first were common.

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The Google interview question was geographic. Well, combine that sense of geography with time for a Doogle question. "What event in history would you want to experience as either spectator or participant." For me, I thought the Columbus event would be miserable being stuck on ships with scurvy and rotten food. Apollo moon trip would be tops but still, in a tiny man made electronic bubble for days. How about the Lewis and Clark expedition? Seeing virgin land all across the country, interacting with native indians, plenty of fresh food and water, freedom to travel, and seeing a first almost as significant as the first that the astronauts saw. The Mayan, Aztec, and Incan cultures' first would be human sacrifice and that's not my thing. GOPs might like it if they were told the one being sacrificed Had it Coming.[in spite of it being someone's virgin daughter, if the elders chose her she deserved it, authority is king]

Being the first white man to Hawaii might not be too bad either. Especially if you could stay and snag a bungalow right on the beach. This would be pre- Pearl Harbor, maybe even before shipping commerce introduced invasive species like rats that became palm rats.

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Viewing that video, the old adage ‘fist full of pardons’ comes to mind.

I’ll continue to mull over it, but at the moment I can’t think of anything better than the Lewis and Clark expedition. What an adventure that must have been. I agree, the Columbus voyage undoubtedly sucked. Almost 300 years later, Captain Cook’s Pacific voyages might have been cool, up until the point he was killed in Hawaii. With our future looking so bleak even minor historical events during the 1980’s are starting to look worthy of a visit, despite the presence of ‘hair bands’ at the time.

Julian Beever’s chalk drawings on the pavement are really cool, it’s a shame they’re not permanent. Though I like and respect their work I’ve never quite understood what motivates artists who work in mediums which aren’t lasting. Especially something like ice carving or sand sculpting. I can’t imagine spending all that effort producing a work only to have it disappear within a matter of hours or days. I remember being pissed at my brother once for erasing my etch-a-sketch drawing before I had a chance to show it to my mom. I bet my brother could've really pissed off some of these sketch artists.

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I would like to revisit the first creation of music, or art. That would be some 43,000 to 35,000 years ago— somebody way back then carved this paleolithic flute, then made music. After the hunt and gathering, after painting the walls of the cave, everybody sat around the fire and listened to live flute music. Not a bad life. (I have a Xiao flute, like this, but I cannot make music with it to save my life. Maybe two notes. That's it. How depressing: I'm not even as smart as the earliest of humans.)

Speaking of recent art, how does this video strike you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9UD1BlGD-Js#t=52

Zenzoe
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What kind of tune would be heard around the fire when the tribe's new baby born was actually half Neanderthal? The men were off on the hunt, she had needs, local neanderthal was up for trying the new breed in town, and she has to explain why this baby was born wearing a coat.

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What kind of tune would be heard around the fire when the tribe's new baby born was actually half Neanderthal? The men were off on the hunt, she had needs, local neanderthal was up for trying the new breed in town, and she has to explain why this baby was born wearing a coat.

Whether the baby was half Neanderthal, full Homo Sapien, or full Neanderthal we don't know for sure. But I imagine their music soothed that baby to sleep, just as our lullabies soothe ours.

I'm not an anthropologist, but it seems the genus Homo came on the scene some 2.5 million years ago, so the makers of the flute I referenced were a later, rather more advanced bunch, living as they did more like between 43,000 to 35.000 years ago. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_human_evolution 

According to Wikipedia's article, the Neanderthals, a subset of homo sapiens, were going extinct by the time of our flute arrived. In any case, I doubt they were all that alien in the homo sapien world.

An artist's rendition of a Homo Sapien. Neanderthal.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lower_Paleolithic

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paleolithic#Art_and_music

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_Paleolithic

Zenzoe
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Toot, Whistle, Plunk, & Boom was a film on tv, and a vinyl recording in our household- 33 1/3 rpm I think, we had 78s too. I wonder if the neanderthal were a nuisance to humans and just as annoying as republicans are to today's humans.

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Quote douglaslee:

Toot, Whistle, Plunk, & Boom was a film on tv, and a vinyl recording in our household- 33 1/3 rpm I think, we had 78s too. I wonder if the neanderthal were a nuisance to humans and just as annoying as republicans are to today's humans.

That's a charming little cartoon, Douglaslee, but its creators apparently had a rather ignorant view of our earliest human relatives. Also, you seem unaware that "Neanderthals are our closest extinct human relatives," not that the flute I referenced was created by Neanderthals, specifically.

The unfortunate stereotype of these people as dim-witted and brutish cavemen still lingers in popular ideology but detailed scientific research has revealed a more accurate picture. Neanderthals were advanced humans, capable of intelligent thought processes and were able to adapt to and survive in some of the harshest environments known to humans. http://australianmuseum.net.au/Homo-neanderthalensis

“The evidence for cognitive inferiority is simply not there. What we are saying is that the conventional view of Neanderthals is not true,” said Dr Paola Villa from the University of Colorado at Boulder Villa, who is the first author on the paper. http://www.sci-news.com/othersciences/anthropology/science-neanderthals-...

Estimates of the age of cave paintings in northern Spain could be the final nail in the coffin of the 'dumb Neanderthals' myth. http://www.theguardian.com/science/2012/jun/14/neanderthals-first-create-cave-paintings

I don't know what their music sounded like. I do know the cave paintings produced by our earliest human relatives were beautiful and sophisticated symbolic representations. Is it possible you might be underestimating the intelligence not only early human artists, but artists, in general?

Zenzoe
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Quote Zenzoe:
Quote douglaslee:

Toot, Whistle, Plunk, & Boom was a film on tv, and a vinyl recording in our household- 33 1/3 rpm I think, we had 78s too. I wonder if the neanderthal were a nuisance to humans and just as annoying as republicans are to today's humans.

That's a charming little cartoon, Douglaslee, but its creators apparently had a rather ignorant view of our earliest human relatives. Also, you seem unaware that "Neanderthals are our closest extinct human relatives," not that the flute I referenced was created by Neanderthals, specifically.

The unfortunate stereotype of these people as dim-witted and brutish cavemen still lingers in popular ideology but detailed scientific research has revealed a more accurate picture. Neanderthals were advanced humans, capable of intelligent thought processes and were able to adapt to and survive in some of the harshest environments known to humans. http://australianmuseum.net.au/Homo-neanderthalensis

“The evidence for cognitive inferiority is simply not there. What we are saying is that the conventional view of Neanderthals is not true,” said Dr Paola Villa from the University of Colorado at Boulder Villa, who is the first author on the paper. http://www.sci-news.com/othersciences/anthropology/science-neanderthals-...

Estimates of the age of cave paintings in northern Spain could be the final nail in the coffin of the 'dumb Neanderthals' myth. http://www.theguardian.com/science/2012/jun/14/neanderthals-first-create-cave-paintings

I don't know what their music sounded like. I do know the cave paintings produced by our earliest human relatives were beautiful and sophisticated symbolic representations. Is it possible you might be underestimating the intelligence not only early human artists, but artists, in general?

Actually I think neanderthalls are more advanced than some of our current homosapien specimens. There are some homosapiens today with neanderthal dna approaching 4-6%.

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http://deadstate.org/look-korean-artist-turns-her-small-seoul-studio-into-haunting-psychedelic-dream-scapes/ these are really cool! I think there seems a litte bit of Alice in some of the pieces with a touch of Escher. I wonder if a poem could accompany a slide or two.

http://deadstate.org/look-using-only-makeup-russian-artists-turn-models-faces-into-incredible-optical-illusions/ these are too! I couldn't find the real eyes in one of the works.

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Art as a snapshot of cultural history is sometimes in the dialogue, slang, or vernacular.

.vanityfair. Preston Sturges- won an academy award for 1940 The Great McGinty. The Vanity Fair article asserts that Sturges was more of the real America than Capra, Huston, Wilder etal. He dictated his scripts to a secretary playing all the roles. He also loaded the cast with immigrants, or true America, and fast paced dialogue with interuptions, talking over, up yours, ATTITUDE.

Take a powder, pay the lug, boilermaker, tough guy huh? are samples.

The Seven Wonders of Preston SturgesIn just four years, 1940–44, Preston Sturges wrote and directed seven classics reflecting the America he loved and laughed at–a fast-talking, unpredictable melting pot that seems more real than the visions of Frank Capra or John Ford. Then his luck ran out.By Douglas McGrath

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/bus_by_spanish_artist_collective_mmmm_is_the_world_s_most_obvious_bus_stop. and it's great. In Chicago, the city is trying to shrink a gaudy Trump sign on a highrise. They want the lights less Vegas bright too. It is kitchy and cheap, as is Trump. Now, taking the Bus stop idea in the link, and since Chicago can't get rid of the ugly Trump, turning a Trump upside down with the same wood and metal construction, a durable bus stop and an up yours to Donald would be great. Upside down T offers seating, r offers the curve recline, u offers shelter when upside down, m offers more recline or seats upside down, p gives shelter again.

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I don't think this is forked up at all

from a collection: miniature-sculptures-on-pencil-points

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.theparisreview.org/blog/2014/09/03/postcards-from-another-planet/

Problem is, I find myself captivated by our spam, so much so that I keep a running list of my favorite comments. As far as I know, they’re entirely computer generated: an algorithm hurls together bits of text from around the Internet, hoping to rustle up enough verisimilitude to trick our spam filter. The results are unduly captivating—they’re by turns ludic, cryptic, disquieting, emotional, and inadvertently profound. On many days they’re more interesting than the comments we receive from real people.

Here, for instance, is an automated comment from “geniadove”:

If you give it your name it will call you by it when you start up the GPS. These incidences come about quite normally, showing that Peter dislikes his daughter. A huge clue that your ex boyfriend still has feelings for you. —geniadove

That swerve at “Peter dislikes his daughter”—whoa! Dissertations have been written about less. And to see a clinical phrase like “These incidences come about quite normally” next to a casual one like “A huge clue”: What does it all mean? The mind searches restlessly, somewhat desperately, for connective tissue, some semblance of conventional narrative. Like autostereograms, these comments always verge on resolving into a discernible whole; unlike autostereograms, they never do.

there are a number of literary antecedents here: found poetry, Dadaist ready-mades, collage and bricolage, cutups, aleatoric poems, various Oulipo shenanigans. Most especially, there’s spoetry, spam lit, and flarf, similar movements from the past two decades that have made poetic hay from the Internet’s endless detritus. Flarf descends from Gary Sullivan, who collaborated with other poets online, constructing abhorrently bland poems from the results of random Google searches, workplace memos, Associated Press stories, and the like. (“awe yea You see, somebody’s done messed up / my latvian women’s soccer team fantasy REAL bad, / oh pagers make of cheese,” goes a representative sample.) As the flarfist Sharon Mesmer told Poets & Writers in 2009,

There’s this idea that juxtaposition creates a little pop in your mind to take you out of your immediate, mundane reality. When we do these crazy things with Google, a lot of times we’re putting something beautiful together with something ugly, and it makes this third thing that is completely delightful and unexpected.

And in 2008, the Guardian ran a piece on spam lit and its practitioners, especially Ben Myers and Lee Ranaldo, both of whom have published volumes of work derived from spam:

These instances of found poetry—often containing nuggets of unwitting but unalloyed beauty—seemed, in Myers’s words, like “scriptures from the future” or “postcards from another planet.” Discovering them in your inbox made you feel like Cocteau’s Orpheus picking up cryptic poetic messages from the underworld on his car radio.

That sense of private discovery, of trespassing, is key to the somewhat vertiginous feeling you get from reading a quality piece of spam: you’ve gone past the edge of something, and you’re not supposed to be there, but there you are, enjoying the vista.

Out of chaos and randomness can come beauty, like life. Or a more honed version of life, humans.

Kerouac or Ginsburg or some beat author once experimented with random sentences cut from already published books, magazines and newspapers placed in a pile or bag and shaken, then picked and pasted to it's final edit page. One man's gibberish is another's art.

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.the paris review the art+of+humor Woody Allen, Garrison Keillor, Thurber and more are all interviewed. For an up to date take, a tea party unit ought to be included. After all, they are clowns.

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Salvador Dali, Andy Warhol, Mad Magazine's Don Martin are all in a David-Lynch- comparison article. Pretty good company to be compared to.

The first image glimpsed beyond the portal to “David Lynch: The Unified Field” might be a riff on one of Jasper Johns’s late 1960s single-image relief paintings—a human face at the center of a dark grey field, supported, as if a flower, by a stringy-looking white stalk. Entering the room you discover it’s the 1967 canvas Man Throwing Up. Welcome to Lynchland, where bodily fluids and organic matter are the coin of the realm, orifices gape, revulsion merges with delicacy, and austerity is the handmaiden of disgust.

After studying for a few semesters at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Lynch enrolled at PAFA in January 1966. By his own account, proudly displayed on “Unified Field” signage, he found Philadelphia, then in a state of urban decay, to be a revelation. The city had “a great mood—factories, smoke, railroads, diners, the strangest characters and the darkest night… I saw vivid images—plastic curtains held together with Band-Aids, rags stuffed in broken windows.”

Lynch’s student work includes a number of meticulous, soot-colored drawings of twisted organs and tortured torsos, reminiscent of the surrealist doll-maker Hans Bellmer, and, even more, Lynch’s then idol, Francis Bacon. Lynch’s most celebrated piece, Six Men Getting Sick (1967) is a study in abstract projectile vomiting, with an animated film loop projected on a shaped canvas, accompanied by the sound of a police siren. Dropping out of PAFA in mid-1967, the artist remained in Philadelphia, painting and making short films, for another three years; he relocated to Los Angeles after receiving an AFI fellowship to work on the feature project that would eventually become Eraserhead, a movie Lynch would always associate with his life in Philadelphia.

btw, there is a video on the link too. This is the film "6 Men Getting Sick".

The siren wasn't necessary and a woman could've been included. They have to learn to use a free hand to keep their hair out of the way while projectile vomiting, and I think it would add to the film.

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http://berlinbooks.org/brb/2009/12/gods-executioner/

Chris Hayes did a spot on TX execution witnesses for the state. Their job was to be eyewitness to death for the state.

The first link is the executioners of 16th century Nuremburg and other hamlets.

To tie the two images together under this thread's Art title how about a Dali/Warhol Pastiche of Robespierre retrieving from the guillotine basket the head of Dick Cheney? In a Lynch animation, his snarl could still be sputtering forth..

from the link:

But just below the surface, beyond the facticity of all the deaths caused by his very hand, the journal of Meister Frantz opens up a rich source for topics ranging from early modern concepts of identity and social status to notions about the human body and the development of both the picaresque and autobiographical genres. As Schmidt grows in both professional and storytelling experience, his accounts of the various unfortunates he encounters become both more colourful and more revealing of his inner world. Consequently, the journal unveils not so much a detailed portrait as a vivid sketch of the moral cosmology of a sixteenth-century executioner.

Frantz Schmidt considered himself first and foremost a professional, a master in the guild sense. And as in other crafts, the trade of the executioner was often passed from father to son, with Frantz following his own father, the hangman of Bamberg, into the family occupation, at the age of 18. After five years’ work as a journeyman, he secured a permanent appointment at nearby Nuremberg, succeeding his future father-in-law as the city’s official executioner – a position he would hold for a remarkable 40 years. Throughout this period Schmidt enjoyed a life of bourgeois respectability with his wife, Maria, and seven children in their spacious Nuremberg residence, boasting an annual salary that put him on a par with the city’s wealthiest jurists. After his retirement, in 1617, Schmidt began a lucrative career as a medical consultant, exploiting his extensive knowledge of human anatomy – now to the end of saving lives. Upon his death, in 1634, Schmidt enjoyed a state funeral and burial in the city’s most prominent cemetery, a few paces away from other famous sons, Albrecht Dürer and Hans Sachs. Schmidt’s life, in virtually every respect, had been a great social success, although the dishonourable nature of his profession consistently precluded his open participation in patrician and craftsmen circles alike, placing him and his family in a unique kind of social limbo.

Some tales of the crimes of the sentenced are there, too.

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Ralph Bakshi of '70s Fritz the Cat fame did quite a few others.

Coonskin was most controversial

A satire with Brer Rabbit, Brer fox, and Brer Bear in a cross with Uncle Remus and Songs of the South but not Wind of the Willows character images. Miss America IS America in the cast which includes a John Wayne, a gay, some hookers, redneck cops, prison and prison guards, Johns (including the sheriff) for the hookers.

Ralph Bakshi was born in Haifa in Palestine 1936, so born a Palestinian . Lived in Brownsville Brooklyn (the black section) and Foggy Bottom DC, the black section pre-desegregation. He wanted to go to school where all his friends were, the black school across the street in Foggy Bottom. He was the only white kid so the sherif came and removed him to prevent problems. He also said Coonskin is not anti-black but anti-idiot.

He's almost got a Lenny Bruce perspective. American Family Assoc said his Mighty Mouse (returns in the 80s on CBS) was encouraging kids to snort coke because he smell a flower and the petals went into his nostrils. They said he was a pornographer too, because some of the adult cartoons had naked animated characters.

It is really an unusual film and I liked it, I get satire. His animation style is rotocross (or something close to that) where he films real characters then traces animation on the still images of the film being shown from a projector on etched glass plates upheld on an easel. Max Fleischer patented this with Popeye. Betty Boop used it too. The light sabres in star wars used the same technique.

Bakshi also did American Pop, Wizards, Lord of the Rings, and a few others. He fits with Terry Gilliam and David Lynch in animated art genre, and not Disney or Hanna Barbara. Maybe a bit of Mad Magazine and Playboy's cartoon figures in an animated version.

Mighty Mouse returns with Bakshi until the church folks stopped it. Remember, Tinky Winky was gay, Sponge Bob is gay, and is an environmentalist against capitalism. Cartoons according to fox, falwell, and afa this is their reality. Abraham killing his son is ok for kids, and genocide of the wrong tribe, and taking all their livestock.

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Coonskin full movie free

Warning a cartoon girl is naked in one seen. Think Rebecca Rabbit (the most paused and tivo-ed cartoon figure according to Nielsen). The cops and prison guards are killing like the current day police.

btw, Barry White and Scatman Corruthers star.

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Aardman Animations are British claymation works, funny and topical. A guy and his dog are stars in many shorts. The dog can read, but cannot talk. He can roll his eyes, or smack his head in frustration over the human, the supposed smart one's antics.

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

paris-thrill-of the Modern and impressionism/ if you open this you get to see "Woman with a Pearl Necklace in a Loge", it's beautiful, it's 1879.

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

/unreal-street-artist-plays-hallelujah-with-crystal-glasses/ he reaches a crescendo about 3/4 into it. He has the glasses strap mounted on pedestals that might preserve the kinetic vibrations or transmit to adjacent vessels. I thought it pretty cool.

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Spy magazine, a satirical publication from '80s and early '90s is now on GOOGLE books. "The magazine is trash!"- Donald Trump.

The site I found also had New Yorker reprints and Baffler (editor Thomas Frank, and starting partner) Anyhow, their covers or maybe just art are- http://thebaffler.com/art

I liked them, some were really cool, and worth putting into a file/slide show. If I could set up screen saver wallpaper that rotates, there are a lot of images worth gazing at for moments, fleeting or not.

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douglaslee
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Why Hasn't Congress Taken War Powers Away From Trump?

Thom plus logo Donald Trump's pathetic betrayal of our Kurdish allies in northern Syria highlights the importance of Congress taking seriously it's constitutional obligation to define and authorize war.
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