Eternal Life

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In the “talking religion with my nephew” thread, uncle of said nephew asked many direct questions about things considered to be central to religion from his perspective. Belief in after life was one such question with perhaps unexpected answers about worms and bird poop from a very wise man unique to his religious perspective:

Quote polycarp2:

Quote drbjmn:

You certainly are not a "condemnation" type christian, but you are a 'Christian." And as such, I suppose you believe in an after life. And the experience you will have in that afterlife, is affected by how you conduct yourself in this life.

Is that true?

Sure I believe in an afterlife. The physical form will turn into worm poop and later perhaps a carrot eaten by a rabbit, consumed by an eagle, turned into eagles eggs, the excess excreted and dropped again as poop on someone's head. I'll one day perhaps pay you a visit in a form you'd not prefer.

We are thought...spirit...and I don't know how to explain what my definition of spirit is. An experience of "spirit" leads one to conclude that there is but one manifested in many forms. Spirit, like love, has no physical form and like love can be expressed in a physical form. Some define spirit as that which distinguises a dead cell from a living one...life.

Afterlife punishment? I'm concerned about the now. Reward/punishment are in the here and now...and are related to one's inter-actions with the external. Reward/punishment are internal. LIfe is either an amazing wonder and a joy, or it isn't. Is their a sense of self after death? Some monks have suggested that Spirit knows no division when it isn't manifested in physical forms. One day, we'll all know the answer with certainty....or we won't know the answer at all.

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

It’s been far too long since Polycarp has graced this site and I would deeply regret his not gracing it once again. I wish him safe passage on whatever journey he is on. That got me thinking about afterlife.

Afterlife via worm food and bird poop is one very rational explanation, but I have always seen it as another. Passing on your wisdom and doling out kindnesses to others such that your influence lives on into perpetuity is another means of eternal life is it not? If so, Polycarp’s influence on me alone will multiply itself like compound interest through me and beyond me into perpetuity. It boggles my mind to consider how many others have been touched by him. When I do, it gives me absolute certainty in saying, “yes, I believe in afterlife” and Polycarp has it in spades.

Laborisgood's picture
Laborisgood
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Comments

Is it possible someone knows what happened? Drc2?

drbjmn
Joined:
Jul. 22, 2013 5:52 am

I've been on vacation...pondering such things gazing at the Rocky Mountains. My unobstructed view was about 100 mile north and 100 miles south...and an immense sky. I spent hours watching clouds/weather form over the mountain peaks and slip down over the plains. Had the life-giving waters from their watersheds not been....nether would I. I was born/raised at their base.

We are taught from the Christian pulpit that we return to dust as though it's a "bad thing". It isn't. God exists in all of creation, regardless of forms. The opposite side of the coin in some Christian theology, is that all of creation exists within God as well.

The life that went before me makes up my own body...just as my own will one day make up the life that follows my own. When one looks at the planet itself as sacred and with wonder and awe, life/death become beautiful and inseparable one from the other. Life goes on regardless of what we do or don't do, think about or don't think about. I'm in no hurry to pass on the baton of life to another life, whatever form it may be, and have no qualms in doing so. We have our time, and then it's time for another to experience its wonders.

I suppose if one lives outside of that philosophy, the idea of death takes on different meanings.

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

polycarp2
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

You could have begun that post, with your usual, "Probably.."

Now about that returning to poop on me...:)

drbjmn
Joined:
Jul. 22, 2013 5:52 am

Welcome back Poly, I'm glad all is well. I like to visit mountains too. I always feel humbled when standing at their base, and free and less burdened when standing on their slopes. Maybe it's the lower atmospheric pressure or something, I don't know, but there's nothing else like sitting on top of the world.

organican's picture
organican
Joined:
Nov. 30, 2012 4:24 am

Vacations are a blessed thing ..... sacred even. They should be mandatory.

So nice to have you back Polycarp. Sorry for exaggerating the implied rumors of your demise. I was caught in a moment that I had to embrace.

I'm hoping to make it up to Lake Superior later this summer and enjoy the serenity of a large body of frigid water. As of last week, they still had some ice on the lake.

Laborisgood's picture
Laborisgood
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm

Thanks for your kind words on my premature demise. Best wishes for a pleasant , inspirational trip.

Retired Monk - "Ideology is a disease"

polycarp2
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 4:01 pm