Energy Department to invest in next-generation Marine energy & cutting-edge enhanced Geothermal!

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Energy from waves! It seems like a great idea but it could certainly have enviromental consequences if not located right.

The Energy Department announced it's going to invest. Below is the first part of the text and a link to read it all.

The Energy Department today announced $10.5 million in available funding to support the design and operation of innovative marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) systems through survivability and reliability-related testing of these systems. Such advances will help these devices harness even more sustainable energy from the enormous potential of the nation's oceans and rivers.

Link on next comment page.

MrsBJLee's picture
MrsBJLee
Joined:
Feb. 17, 2012 8:45 am

Comments

Here is a link to the above article that I just couldn't get to work while on the 1st comment.

http://energy.gov/eere/articles/energy-department-announces-105-million-...?

MrsBJLee's picture
MrsBJLee
Joined:
Feb. 17, 2012 8:45 am

It's exciting to me that they are working on cutting-edge enhanced geothermal. Anyone here have more information than what's at the following site??

http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-announces-project-selection...

MrsBJLee's picture
MrsBJLee
Joined:
Feb. 17, 2012 8:45 am

I'm not so sure about the bobbing up and down of geneator to produce lot of electricity. Technical reason for this.

but tidal power generation has much bigger potential. Scotland, Netherland, S. Korea and even China is in the game. And where is US?

S. Korean system syas it can generate 5.5billion KW a year. Us could do this on Mississippi River, Hudson, Columbia, and elsewhere.

smilingcat
Joined:
Sep. 23, 2010 8:14 am

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