Sometimes we win!

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I just got this in my email and I couldn't be more thrilled to post it. I have been worried that we wouldn't be able to protect our whales and dolphins from navy testing. Here is the latest just delivered to by inbox along with a link (that will hopefully work)

I'm David Henkin from Earthjustice's Mid-Pacific office in Hawai'i. As the lead
attorney in our ongoing case seeking to protect whales from reckless Navy
training exercises, I want to reach out and personally thank you for taking
action. And I have exciting news to share!

Thanks to the generous support of people like you, we just won an important
decision to protect endangered whales and other marine species. A federal judge
ruled in our case that the 5-year plan by the U.S. Navy for testing and training
activities off Hawai'i and Southern California violates laws meant to protect
endangered whales and other marine species.

This is a victory worth celebrating, but the battle to protect our ocean
ecosystems--and the abundant life thriving under our waves--is not over.
Earthjustice is heading back to court to ensure vital marine habitat is
off-limits to harmful training, and we are waging dozens of other critical
battles to protect our oceans.

Brenda, because you care about our oceans, I also want to share a recent
teleconference my colleague and I hosted about this critical lawsuit and other
ways we're fighting tirelessly to protect our oceans:
http://action.earthjustice.org/site/R?i=XZH5z7zkkhhr6yl-Is4ByQ

Irresponsible fishing practices, pollution, and habitat destruction are wearing
down the health of ocean ecosystems. Ocean warming and acidification are
threatening coral reefs and other vibrant, fragile marine ecosystems.

But because of you, there is hope. Your actions demonstrate public support as
Earthjustice battles in court to put an end to these activities that are harming
our oceans.

Listen now to hear how your actions demonstrate public support as Earthjustice
battles in court to put an end to these activities that are harming our oceans:
http://action.earthjustice.org/site/R?i=52gku-dPER0GvJgfYnEJyA

In the U.S., we're lucky to have a set of environmental laws that exist to
protect the irreplaceable wildlife and wild places that we all love--and that
includes the marine life and habitat. But those laws don't mean much if they're
not enforced.

Thank you for all that you do to save our oceans,

David Henkin
Staff Attorney

http://earthjustice.org/features/teleconference-because-oceans-need-lawy...

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MrsBJLee
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Good news Brenda

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stwo
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

I thank God for those lawyers fighting the good fight and for those supporting their efforts!

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MrsBJLee
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This just in!!! I just got this in my email and it certainly shows the power we have when we make a commitment to be heard. We do have the power in our hands and sometimes we win!

"

"Thanks to you and a strong network of allies working on this campaign, Lowe’s has made the most significant public commitment so far for a retailer of its size. It has joined a growing number of retailers that are taking action on neonics -- including Home Depot and BJ’s Wholesale Club.

So what does this mean? Lowe’s will phase out neonics and plants pre-treated with them by the spring of 2019 (or sooner, if possible). It is also working with suppliers to minimize pesticide use overall and move to safer alternatives.

Lowe’s progress is encouraging, but we can’t stop now. The next-largest garden retailers, True Value and Ace, have yet to make any similar commitments on bee-killing pesticides. If we can get them to join Lowe’s, it would be a huge step forward in ensuring that all of us can plant bee-friendly gardens!"

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Here is a petition list to go along with what I posted above. I hope you will read it, personalize it and sign it.

http://action.foe.org/p/dia/action3/common/public/

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MrsBJLee
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YEAH! HERE'S ANOTHER WIN!!! THIS IS GREAT NEWS!!!!!

For Immediate Release, April 6, 2015

Contacts: George Sexton, Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center, (541) 778-8120
Kimberly Baker, Klamath Forest Alliance, (707) 834-8826
Justin Augustine, Center for Biological Diversity, (503) 910-9214

California Salmon and Wildlife Win Court Protection From Logging

Judge Rules Habitat Conservation Plan Too Kind to Loggers, Hard on Wildlife

YREKA, Calif.— A federal court has halted a logging plan in northern California that would have harmed old-growth forests and federally protected fish and owls. The decision by the U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, stems from a lawsuit filed by three conservation groups against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service in 2013 for approving a “habitat conservation plan” for Fruit Growers Supply Company that allowed it to log thousands of acres during the next 10 years and to “take” (harm or kill) endangered species, including up to 83 northern spotted owls, nearly half the owls believed to live in the area.

Under the Endangered Species Act, a habitat conservation plan can allow for the harming or killing of endangered species but only if the plan limits that harm as much as possible and includes appropriate mitigation measures. Instead, the Fruit Growers Supply logging plan called for aggressive forest liquidation in the plan’s first decade while allowing the company to take credit for owl habitat on federal public lands. The court’s decision means that Fruit Growers Supply will not be allowed to harm struggling salmon populations, destroy spotted owl habitat and decimate old-growth forests on 150,000 acres in Siskiyou County.

“This is a big victory for Northern California’s old-growth forests and its endangered wildlife,” said George Sexton, conversation director of the Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center. “The court made it clear that this type of destructive logging is not only bad for our environment, it’s illegal.”

“The math on this plan simply doesn’t add up,” said Kimberly Baker, executive director of the Klamath Forest Alliance. “Old-growth forests that take hundreds of years to grow can’t be replaced in 50 years. These irreplaceable Northern California forests and the wildlife that lives in them need to be preserved, not sold off for vague promises of improvements that may never happen.”

“The Endangered Species Act is designed to be a safety net for our most vulnerable wildlife,” said Justin Augustine with the Center for Biological Diversity. “This decision reinforces that principle and will prevent Fruit Growers Supply Co. from getting a free pass to destroy the forests that spotted owls, salmon and many other species rely upon to survive.”

The conservation organizations — Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center, Klamath Forest Alliance, and the Center for Biological Diversity — were represented in the lawsuit by the Washington Forest Law Center and the Western Environmental Law Center.

The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 825,0

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This just in from Audubon......

We have great news! The California Fish and Game Commission passed the regulations to phase-out lead ammunition at today’s hearing.

Today’s decision implements Assembly Bill 711, which Audubon California co-sponsored in 2013 with Defenders of Wildlife and the Humane Society of the United States.

The vote was unanimous and a great victory for vulnerable birds like the California Condor and the Golden Eagle. California is the first state to commit to protecting wildlife by phasing out lead.

Thank you again for advocacy, none of this is possible without your voice.

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MrsBJLee
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That's good news MrsB, but the ordinance must pertain to upland game birds because federally it's been illegal to hunt water fowl with anything but steel shot for awhile. Per federal regs:

SUMMARY OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS

NOTICE - The material below is only a summary of Federal rules. Each hunter should also consult the actual Federal regulations, which may be found in Title 50, code of Federal Regulations, Part 20.
RESTRICTIONS. No person shall take migratory game birds:

A. While possessing shot (either in shot shells or as loose shot for muzzleloading) other than steel shot or such shot approved as nontoxic while taking Anatidae (ducks, geese, and brant), coots and any species that make up aggregate bag limits during concurrent seasons.

rs allen
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Mar. 15, 2012 4:55 pm
Quote rs allen:

That's good news MrsB, but the ordinance must pertain to upland game birds because federally it's been illegal to hunt water fowl with anything but steel shot for awhile. Per federal regs:

SUMMARY OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS

NOTICE - The material below is only a summary of Federal rules. Each hunter should also consult the actual Federal regulations, which may be found in Title 50, code of Federal Regulations, Part 20.
RESTRICTIONS. No person shall take migratory game birds:

A. While possessing shot (either in shot shells or as loose shot for muzzleloading) other than steel shot or such shot approved as nontoxic while taking Anatidae (ducks, geese, and brant), coots and any species that make up aggregate bag limits during concurrent seasons.

I guess you are right. I hope it also applies to other game besides birds. Like for instance deer comes to my mind. I'm not a hunter.

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Quote MrsBJLee:This just in!!! I just got this in my email and it certainly shows the power we have when we make a commitment to be heard. We do have the power in our hands and sometimes we win! ""Thanks to you and a strong network of allies working on this campaign, Lowe’s has made the most significant public commitment so far for a retailer of its size. It has joined a growing number of retailers that are taking action on neonics -- including Home Depot and BJ’s Wholesale Club.

So what does this mean? Lowe’s will phase out neonics and plants pre-treated with them by the spring of 2019 (or sooner, if possible). It is also working with suppliers to minimize pesticide use overall and move to safer alternatives.

Lowe’s progress is encouraging, but we can’t stop now. The next-largest garden retailers, True Value and Ace, have yet to make any similar commitments on bee-killing pesticides. If we can get them to join Lowe’s, it would be a huge step forward in ensuring that all of us can plant bee-friendly gardens!"

I predict this will backfire due to farmers using more environmentally damaging pesticides than neo nics once they cant get neo nics

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stwo
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm
Quote stwo:
Quote MrsBJLee:This just in!!! I just got this in my email and it certainly shows the power we have when we make a commitment to be heard. We do have the power in our hands and sometimes we win! ""Thanks to you and a strong network of allies working on this campaign, Lowe’s has made the most significant public commitment so far for a retailer of its size. It has joined a growing number of retailers that are taking action on neonics -- including Home Depot and BJ’s Wholesale Club.

So what does this mean? Lowe’s will phase out neonics and plants pre-treated with them by the spring of 2019 (or sooner, if possible). It is also working with suppliers to minimize pesticide use overall and move to safer alternatives.

Lowe’s progress is encouraging, but we can’t stop now. The next-largest garden retailers, True Value and Ace, have yet to make any similar commitments on bee-killing pesticides. If we can get them to join Lowe’s, it would be a huge step forward in ensuring that all of us can plant bee-friendly gardens!"

I predict this will backfire due to farmers using more environmentally damaging pesticides than neo nics once they cant get neo nics

I really hope you are wrong. I PRAY farmers decide to move into organic farming once they realize that more and more people are becoming aware of the crap that's in the food they've been eating. There will always be a market for conventional pesticide laden foods but hopefully that market will continue to shrink and honestly I don't think ALL of the farmers that bought into the round-up ready propaganda are happy that they made that choice. I honestly think many are trying to find a way out of the Monsanto mess they find themselves in.

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The farmers are going to systemic insecticide. What is it? You spray the field or spread pellets onto the ground, it dissolves into the water which are taken up by the plant. In process, the plants absorb the insecticide and the WHOLE plant becomes poison to most all insects including bees and other pollinators.

That is where the farmers are heading. The poison is actively sucked up by the plants so its more economical and more "EFFECTIVE". Rather bad stuff. Not sure if I want to eat any leafy greens or vegetables from plants treated with the new systemic insecticide. Nor do I want meat whose animal grazed on the stuff.

Lot of farmers don't want to be bothered by organics because you have to think and plan well in advance. You have to plan out your planting schedule three to four years in advance. Sometimes you have to change if get an outbreak of things like clubfoot on brassicas (broccoli, cabbage family). Spores in the soil stays active for four or more years.

It's bit mindless if you can use all available poison. Spray per ag chem rep tells you and voila you get your crop. Does it look pretty? probably. do they all look alike? most likely. Does it taste good? maybe not. Is it nutritious? maybe not. ...

smilingcat
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Sep. 23, 2010 8:14 am

Ummm, Yummy! Nothing like eating Monsanto Tomatoes! Actually, Yuk! And that's a big yuk! I can't stand store bought tomatoes...they taste like cotton except they chew like rubber. One thing though...they seem to have a shelf life of almost forever! That, you think, until you cut into them and find that they have sprouted inside the tomato. Looks really creepy...like some triffid is growing inside! That's why I grow my own. They always taste like tomatoes should.

With the frankenfoods some people eat from the stores, it's no wonder people are finding weird strands of something growing out of their scalps or bodies...and it isn't hair!

I couldn't find the video I saw once which was rigid wire-like strands growing out of the skin. I don't think they were normal hair strands because they were rigid. But, I did run across these: Hint: don't go to Belize or drink the water in Indonesia!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEWD-mZSuKk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DStwXsmZ3OE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmVseKdB6So

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Palindromedary
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Quote smilingcat:

The farmers are going to systemic insecticide. What is it? You spray the field or spread pellets onto the ground, it dissolves into the water which are taken up by the plant. In process, the plants absorb the insecticide and the WHOLE plant becomes poison to most all insects including bees and other pollinators.

That is where the farmers are heading. The poison is actively sucked up by the plants so its more economical and more "EFFECTIVE". Rather bad stuff. Not sure if I want to eat any leafy greens or vegetables from plants treated with the new systemic insecticide. Nor do I want meat whose animal grazed on the stuff.

Lot of farmers don't want to be bothered by organics because you have to think and plan well in advance. You have to plan out your planting schedule three to four years in advance. Sometimes you have to change if get an outbreak of things like clubfoot on brassicas (broccoli, cabbage family). Spores in the soil stays active for four or more years.

It's bit mindless if you can use all available poison. Spray per ag chem rep tells you and voila you get your crop. Does it look pretty? probably. do they all look alike? most likely. Does it taste good? maybe not. Is it nutritious? maybe not. ...

Well that sounds an awful lot like the so called "sweet corn" they created. The plant either makes the poison or it gets sucked up into it like you mentioned above and you get to have insecticide with each kernel of corn you eat. Unbelievable!

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MrsBJLee
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Quote Palindromedary:Ummm, Yummy! Nothing like eating Monsanto Tomatoes! Actually, Yuk! And that's a big yuk! I can't stand store bought tomatoes...they taste like cotton except they chew like rubber. One thing though...they seem to have a shelf life of almost forever! That, you think, until you cut into them and find that they have sprouted inside the tomato. Looks really creepy...like some triffid is growing inside! That's why I grow my own. They always taste like tomatoes should. With the frankenfoods some people eat from the stores, it's no wonder people are finding weird strands of something growing out of their scalps or bodies...and it isn't hair! I couldn't find the video I saw once which was rigid wire-like strands growing out of the skin. I don't think they were normal hair strands because they were rigid. But, I did run across these: Hint: don't go to Belize or drink the water in Indonesia! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEWD-mZSuKk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DStwXsmZ3OE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmVseKdB6So

I REMEMBER what you are talking about! Strange strands and they were colored like blue and red! I couldn't bring myself to watch past the point there they were getting ready to take the maggot out of that guy's back. Sorry. I just had dinner. LOL

OK I FOUND IT.....IT'S CALLED MORGELLONS DISEASE! I don't have a video but have a link to a site with images. I could find a video for sure but I'm moving on.

http://morgellonsdiseaseawareness.com/morgellons_photo_galleries/morgell...

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I'm not really a hunter either MrsB. or perhaps I should say I don't hunt for sport as I've never found much joy in killing things and in times of plenty I don't play in the field with anything but my sense of wonder, I don't even pack my fishing rod.

I wonder what would replace lead for rifle ammo? I don't imagine it'll happen any time soon whatever it may be because that single shot that may miss it's intended target is far less likely to cause any environmental harm than say all the tiny lead shot that by design scatter over a wide area with each and every shotgun discharge. Most all of those pellets will miss their intended target every time even on a skeet range. And we all know how good lead is for living things in general. So to get lead banned for upland game birds (quail, pheasants, chukka, etc) or better yet for shotguns period, is a significant step in the right direction for the environment.

rs allen
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Mar. 15, 2012 4:55 pm

Rifle bullets, and all the other ammos including 7.62mm, to .45 to .38, 9mm and oh can't forget the ubiquitous .22 long,which you buy in "bricks" (500 rounds), should all replace the lead with iron. It's not as dense so will not go as far nor have the same "punch" but it would be much friendlier to the environment.

Stores can't keep the large caliber and high powered rifle ammos in stock. They buy them in pallet loads and it blows through the door. How much lead was in each of those pallets?

hmm does the ban include 12 gauge slugs? They weigh about 3x as much as some high powered rifle bullets.

lead bullets and pellets goes into the gizard to be ground up into fine powder. birds gets lead poisoning and when they die, they can create micro super fund site me think.

smilingcat
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Sep. 23, 2010 8:14 am
Quote rs allen:

I'm not really a hunter either MrsB. or perhaps I should say I don't hunt for sport as I've never found much joy in killing things and in times of plenty I don't play in the field with anything but my sense of wonder, I don't even pack my fishing rod.

I wonder what would replace lead for rifle ammo? I don't imagine it'll happen any time soon whatever it may be because that single shot that may miss it's intended target is far less likely to cause any environmental harm than say all the tiny lead shot that by design scatter over a wide area with each and every shotgun discharge. Most all of those pellets will miss their intended target every time even on a skeet range. And we all know how good lead is for living things in general. So to get lead banned for upland game birds (quail, pheasants, chukka, etc) or better yet for shotguns period, is a significant step in the right direction for the environment.

I agree that it's a significant step in the right direction for the environment and I am happy to see it happen!

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Quote smilingcat:

Rifle bullets, and all the other ammos including 7.62mm, to .45 to .38, 9mm and oh can't forget the ubiquitous .22 long,which you buy in "bricks" (500 rounds), should all replace the lead with iron. It's not as dense so will not go as far nor have the same "punch" but it would be much friendlier to the environment.

Stores can't keep the large caliber and high powered rifle ammos in stock. They buy them in pallet loads and it blows through the door. How much lead was in each of those pallets?

hmm does the ban include 12 gauge slugs? They weigh about 3x as much as some high powered rifle bullets.

lead bullets and pellets goes into the gizard to be ground up into fine powder. birds gets lead poisoning and when they die, they can create micro super fund site me think.

Time will tell what they end up replacing the lead with. There is a lot of money in ammo so I'm sure they've been working on the replacement for awhile now. They had to know this was going to happen sooner or later don't you think?

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MrsBJLee #15: Thanks for that link! Morgellon's disease! Now I know! There are a number of videos on YouTube about it. Scary!

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Palindromedary
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Quote Palindromedary:MrsBJLee #15: Thanks for that link! Morgellon's disease! Now I know! There are a number of videos on YouTube about it. Scary!

I spent some time reading about the ladies journey with that disease. I can only imagine the suffering they experience with the constant feeling of crawling, itching and biting under their skin but what really startled me was that she got re-infected by petting a DOG that had Morgellon's! It sounds like it's very easily contracted if she got it from a DOG and where did the dog get it from? Did you look at all the photos on that site. If not scroll all the way down to the bottom where there are bundles of fibers! It's horrible!

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MrsBJLee: Yes, I looked through all of those photos. And I agree...it is horrible! It reminds me of the movie "Invasion of the Body Snatchers". I guess I should get my telescope lens out and use it as a magnifying glass. It is a low power 1-1/4" in diameter telescope lens that is more powerful than a normal, larger magnifying glass. I use it for seeing tiny splinters I sometimes get when working on something. I never thought to look for anything other than the splinters. I used to have frequent access to fairly expensive microscopes at work but now that I'm retired, I don't have access anymore. I probably should buy one. One time I had a coworker, that ran an electron-microscope, to take some photos of some mushroom spores...really cool! I was into Mycology (the study of mushrooms) for a while. Found some Death Caps and some Destroying Angels along with a number of other kinds. I don't even like to eat mushrooms now, though. I know it is supposed to be relatively safe but the idea of having one's liver destroyed by eating just a little by mistake is not a pleasant thought. Only thing you can do is get a liver transplant. Not worth it! And I don't trust commercial growers or inspectors with mushrooms any more than I trust meat inspectors to keep contaminated meat from being sold. I went off of eating red meet and pork back over a decade...maybe two decades ago when Mad Cow Disease was in the news. I eat chicken, turkey and fish (but no shell fish...gout problems sometimes). And yes, I know of the problems with those as well. Maybe I'll become a vegetarian! ;-} Well, I certainly went off topic!

I guess I'll have to not be so anxious to pet dogs from now on! ;-}

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Palindromedary
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Quote Palindromedary:MrsBJLee: Yes, I looked through all of those photos. And I agree...it is horrible! It reminds me of the movie "Invasion of the Body Snatchers". I guess I should get my telescope lens out and use it as a magnifying glass. It is a low power 1-1/4" in diameter telescope lens that is more powerful than a normal, larger magnifying glass. I use it for seeing tiny splinters I sometimes get when working on something. I never thought to look for anything other than the splinters. I used to have frequent access to fairly expensive microscopes at work but now that I'm retired, I don't have access anymore. I probably should buy one. One time I had a coworker, that ran an electron-microscope, to take some photos of some mushroom spores...really cool! I was into Mycology (the study of mushrooms) for a while. Found some Death Caps and some Destroying Angels along with a number of other kinds. I don't even like to eat mushrooms now, though. I know it is supposed to be relatively safe but the idea of having one's liver destroyed by eating just a little by mistake is not a pleasant thought. Only thing you can do is get a liver transplant. Not worth it! And I don't trust commercial growers or inspectors with mushrooms any more than I trust meat inspectors to keep contaminated meat from being sold. I went off of eating red meet and pork back over a decade...maybe two decades ago when Mad Cow Disease was in the news. I eat chicken, turkey and fish (but no shell fish...gout problems sometimes). And yes, I know of the problems with those as well. Maybe I'll become a vegetarian! ;-} Well, I certainly went off topic! I guess I'll have to not be so anxious to pet dogs from now on! ;-}

I only ate chicken, turkey and fish rarely beef until recently (Nov 2014) when my doctor told me about the paleo diet. Now I eat like a cavegirl! :-)

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I just LOVE adding to this topic because it means we won again! THANK GOODNESS!

Just in from my email.......

BIG news! Yesterday, after nearly a year of battling in court to defend Vermont’s law to label genetically engineered (GE) food, a federal judge in Vermont issued a decision affirming the constitutionality of Vermont’s GE food labeling law.

As we have been in so many states, Center for Food Safety was there when concerned consumers like you wanted to draft a GE food labeling bill in Vermont, and we were there when this historic legislation was signed into law. And when big food companies sued Vermont to stop GE labeling in the state, we stepped in to help defend it – and we won.

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MrsBJLee
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Feb. 17, 2012 8:45 am

The above win certainly doesn't mean that it's over. You know as well as I do that Monsanto and the others are not about to take this without a fight but it shows that me can win.

While this is a tremendous victory and critical step, mega food corporations will now push for further proceedings and/or appeal, so the work in Vermont will continue. And Vermont is not our only battleground. Right now, CFS is actively engaged in several other lawsuits that need your support: defending several county ordinances restricting GE crops in both Oregon and Hawaii, and defending a county ordinance in Hawaii about pesticide spraying disclosure and buffer zones.

All across the country, food and chemical corporate giants are filing lawsuits challenging vital new laws passed directly by voters or through their elected representatives – laws set up to protect our farmers, our environment, and our right to know what’s in our food.

These corporations and their allies have been using some of the nation’s highest-paid lawyers, attempting to overturn positive progress across the country. We can’t let that happen. As we have in the past, we’ll be there every step of the way to defend these laws and the communities who worked so hard to pass them. The above text is from Andrew Kimbrell, Executive Director, Center for Food Safety I hope you will consider supporting their efforts.

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"The Saddest Thing Is This Won't Be Breaking News"

Thom plus logo As the world burns, and more and more fossil fuels are being used every day planet-wide, atmospheric carbon dioxide levels passed 416 ppm this week at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. In the 300,000 years since the emergence of modern humans, carbon dioxide levels have never been this high.
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