American Douche Bag vs Cecil the lion

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The dialectic tension between forces of structure and anti structure were what I was using to describe this tension between the need for the rules to keep a lid on the potential for chaos in cities. As cities evolve, some rules may latently represent an old and now decayed or even collapsed order (i.e., the automobile industry that was so much a part of Detroit), and evolving new rules of order to meet the burgeoning needs of the entrepreneurial spirit in individuals finding new ways to cope that will become part of a newer order, if one can actually evolve. Then you also have macro hierarchies of order, from the state to the nation state to consider and work with.

We here in the Willapa watershed, are dealing with those very layers in our own small community where we have an abundance of water, with great potential to process a very tiny community's waste, in the face of both state and Federal regulations that confine (through regulation) our efforts to models that are designed for much larger mass consumption communities, that allow for efficiencies where the costs of processing waste and water collection and distribution infrastructure has far more capacity that would be spread over a much larger population. As a result of the cost involved in meeting regulations that we don't even need for these circumstances, rules that are too rigid to bend to our local needs, some people with very low incomes in this now shrinking extractive industry county, with a total population of a small city (about 21,000 people) are in the position of spending a third of their income each month on water and sewer. That's in some cases a bankrupting formula wherein they are in danger of losing their homes to foreclosure of one sort or another. The mayor and the city council are scratching their heads.

These complexities of rules can sometimes be worked through and changed for the benefit of everyone, and sometimes a community is so fragile it may just collapse and cease to be before it can work that out. The rules themselves, once codified into law, are completely unsympathetic, much like sociopaths tend to be. There is nothing of an actual living, breathing human being about a codified rule. People create them, generally through institutional processes, then everyone's challenged to figure out how to deal with these unsympathetic human creations. Those are just some of the issues created by inventing complex social hierarchies that became civilizations.

But can we now have seven point some odd billion people inhabiting this planet without complex social hierarchies?

Which brings me back to contemplate all the factors we find taking place in The Collapse of Complex Societies.

.ren's picture
.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am

Knowing as much as you know of the predatory nature of civilization ren., I'm sure you've had the idea that there may be a pack waiting to pounce on your small community after running to ground the weakest. That would explain the drive to up grade systems you don't need or want. Just running the weakest to ground, it makes for easy (and cheap pickings). Could be some lions of finance have their eye on that little prize you call your home town.

rs allen
Joined:
Mar. 15, 2012 4:55 pm

No there is no way the human population can be maintained at 7+ + growing billion, and certainly not at the level of consumption taking place now but I doubt it can be accomplished even at more moderate levels of usage. First mankind will only continue to grow in size eventually again out stripping what the ecosystem can absorb or provide. Secondly because of mans outsized appetites he has knowingly painted himself into a corner. And that corner that used to be so far off in the distance is now only a couple of paces away. Humans have always figured if worse comes to worst he could tip toe out on the soft shoes of technology while leaving only some small faint tracks behind. The trouble is he's finding out while what he thought he was putting on the floor was just some silly old paint it's turned out to be contact cement. There will be no tip toeing out of what can truely be called the big one.

rs allen
Joined:
Mar. 15, 2012 4:55 pm

Already happening.

Not the town, that's not worth much. Bulldozer'll take care of that quickly enough.

Timber. This is prime timber growing land. Wet, lots of topsoil because the glaciers stopped to the north of here and didn't scrape off topsoil as it did, say, the northern Washington state counties like Whatcom.

Weyerhaeuser, the timber corporation that got of it cheap from the railroads, that got it for free, has turned their corporation ownership and control of these lands into an international investment fund, and that's what is changing the way logging is being done, which is for the short term bottom line, not for the long term sustainable harvests as it's been since the first old growth clear cuts, late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Next 9.0 earthquake with its usual tsunami will wipe out the infrastructure and take us back to scratch, anyway. Trees will still grow though.

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.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am

My little town's city council recently lifted bans on urban poultry, that is, now residents with yards can have up to six hens, but no roosters, thank you very much.

I would like to have a few hens, but I know nothing about raising chickens. Plus, there's no fence at the back of my property.

Quote .ren:

Next 9.0 earthquake with its usual tsunami will wipe out the infrastructure and take us back to scratch, anyway. Trees will still grow though.


Are you prepared for that?

Zenzoe
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm
Quote Zenzoe:

My little town's city council recently lifted bans on urban poultry, that is, now residents with yards can have up to six hens, but no roosters, thank you very much.

I would like to have a few hens, but I know nothing about raising chickens. Plus, there's no fence at the back of my property.

Quote .ren:

Next 9.0 earthquake with its usual tsunami will wipe out the infrastructure and take us back to scratch, anyway. Trees will still grow though.


Are you prepared for that?

They'll need a little coop with some nests, a door to shut at night to protect them from coyotes, and it would be good to put some kind of fencing across the back. They'll cluck around, scratch around, you could toss thems some chicken feed here and there. Eventually they'll trade you some eggs for the care. Water, don't forget to give them water.

Am I prepared....? Possibly. Depends on the time of year. I'm high enough on a hill above the Willapa River to be out of the Tsunami flood zone. I'll get to watch the town be washed away.

The entire inside walls of my house are kind of sheer walled the way we used to go in and sheer wall homes in the Bay area. Mine, I was happy to discover, after removing a hundred some years of various ideas of "decorating" material, are sheer walled with 3/4 inch tongue and groove old growth doug fir that's the same as the flooring. (Some of the natural beauty of this structure that I've simply no more than revealed are these beautiful solid wood walls. Amusingly, the last attempt at decorating was to install 8 foot panels of fake wood with an extra sometimes mismatched strip cut from another panel to make up the extra foot. My walls are nine feet. That was nailed over several layers of wall paper.) So these "sheer walled" solid wood walls will act as if the house were a big solid fairly inflexible box bouncing around on the shaking, rolling earth. I may have to jack it back up on the foundation after it's all over.

Now, what the earth does under me may not be completely predictable. In the winter with a lot of rain an extended 9.0 earth shaking, the earth under me could turn into a kind of clay milk shake. It will then want to flow, thanks to the forces of gravity. I could end up in a big box sled riding a river of clay down hill towards my neighbors. Who knows how far I would go or what I'll be sliding into. I could end up in the tsunami heading up river to visit my friends Brent and Kathy, though they may be further up river by then.

I've had a good life. I like living here for now.

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.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am

It would seem your house, having been rendered real by your care and artful attention, deserves better than to be uprooted and turned into a “big box sled riding a river of clay.” And yet, Nature doesn’t really give that big a shit about our precious efforts at housing ourselves, does She? If She needs to shift Herself in Her bed, too bad for us. All we can do is hold on, thanking Her for the ride, and thanking our good luck to have had the opportunity to serve Her best interests wherever we could, in our small way.

Anyway, I expect you to live through it; you’ll probably just “build your wings on the way down,” as I imagine you usually do.

Either one of the Elsinore, San Jacinto or San Andreas faults might someday send me down my little hill, but I doubt it. My place stands on solid granite boulders that I do not think plan on going anywhere, anytime soon. The structure itself, however, doesn’t have anything resembling “sheer walls;” no, it’s pretty much built for splinters, scrap and kindling— no match for a big enough shake. It’s a split-level construction on a slope, with my bedroom above empty space below. With one hard jolt in the middle of the night, I’d likely find myself on ground level, with the roof crumpled on top of me. And to think I don’t have earthquake insurance! Oops.

And that’s to say nothing about the wildfires we keep witnessing around here.

Annie Dillard reminder: “We wake, if we ever wake at all, to mystery, rumors of death, beauty, violence…’Seem like we’re just set down here,’ a woman said to me recently, ‘and don’t nobody know why.’”

Zenzoe
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Oh, and I meant to add a thanks for the chicken-raising advice. Trouble is, I'm not about to put a fence at the back of my garden. I want to see the view of the green belt there, the trees, sage and etc., without obstruction. It's not a forest for me to look at, but I like it as it is too much to block it with a fence. Maybe later I'll change my mind. You never can tell...

Zenzoe
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

If it does start rocking and rolling, I'll probably just get out of the house.

I'll grab my expedition pack that I have ready just in case. I can go into the wilderness for a couple of weeks with it. If I can't get my 4X4 out the driveway and headed north on 101, I'll walk. The hill that rises behind my house is covered with trees and they have a network of roots that should hold it together. Everything about that imagined moment remains unknown. I can just start climbing once everything settles.

What To Remember When Waking

In that first

hardly noticed

moment

in which you wake,

coming back

to this life

from the other

more secret,

moveable

and frighteningly

honest

world

where everything

began,

there is a small

opening

into the day

which closes

the moment

you begin your plans.

-

What you can plan

is too small for you to live.

-

What you can live

wholeheartedly

will make plans

enough

for the vitality

hidden in your sleep.

-

To be human

is to become visible

while carrying

what is hidden

as a gift to others.

-

To remember

the other world

in this world

is to live in your true inheritance.

-

You are not

a troubled guest

on this earth,

you are not an accident

amidst other accidents

you were invited

from another and greater

night

than the one

from which

you have just emerged.

-

Now, looking through

the slanting light

of the morning

window toward

the mountain

presence

of everything

that can be,

what urgency

calls you to your

one love? What shape

waits in the seed

of you to grow

and spread

its branches

against a future sky?

-

Is it waiting

in the fertile sea?

In the trees

beyond the house?

In the life

you can imagine

for yourself?

In the open

and lovely

white page

on the waiting desk?

(From: The House of Belonging. Poems by David Whyte. I apologize to David Whyte for not being able to render his poem in the precise way that he published it. Thank you Thom and Co. for creating this fucked up software that decides for me how many spaces I can have between lines.)

I love Annie Dillard's writing, by the way. David Whyte's more of an inner pilgrim's poet for me is all.

I'd fallen in love with Pilgrim At Tinker's Creek when it came out. I was about to take a class from Annie at Western Washington University in the early eighties. She'd accepted me into her over crowded writing class based on some writings I'd submitted, even though I wasn't enrolled in the MBA program. Right at that moment my ex decided it was time for us to part ways. That house slid off it's foundation and down into the depths. I crawled out of the wreckage, somewhat broken, and ended up going on a pilgrimage of my own.

When I got back to Bellingham nearly ten years later Annie was living out on Lummi Island writing The Living.

I might have enjoyed listening to her talk about writing for a term. But I'd already invented myself once again by then. I'm not sure if she was still teaching. I saw her once at the Colophon Cafe that's symbiotically embedded in Village Books in Fairhaven. Our eyes sort of crossed so I nodded and smiled a greeting. Doubt if she remembered me. Probably used to people she doesn't know nodding and smiling. I'm such an introvert I didn't try to remind her. It was hard for me to imagine she wanted to be bothered.

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.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am

Take it from one who's been there, done that and made the wrong choice, you made the right decision not to attend ren.

I would have been much better off working out my personal crisis during that period on my own rather than looking to some one elses artistry that I'd long admired. As it happened all that came out of the ordeal was my confusion and it showed in my work because I never was really there but always somewhere else in my mind. The saddest part is that I had a couple of people pulling strings just to get me into the class taught by this artist. So not only did I get down myself about my lost opportunity for learning but I feel somehow I let down others I hold in respect as well. Took me awhile to get over it and only served to add to the grief to climb over after it was all said and done.

PS.

The art of words are not my medium. ahem, just in case no one could tell. lol

rs allen
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Mar. 15, 2012 4:55 pm

Thanks for that rs.

You can't hide your art, where ever you put it. Words aren't your art, anyway. It's just there.

Back to Gavin's Woodpile, half cord left out of three to stack yesterday. And the sun's getting hotter and hotter.

"distant mountains, blue and liquid,
luminous like a thickening of sky
flash in my mind like a stairway to life --
a train whistle cuts through the scene like a knife
three hawks wheel in a dazzling sky --
a slow motion jet makes them look like a lie
and i'm left to conclude there's no human answer near... "

Bruce Cockburn

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.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am

Truthfuly .ren, I don't like talking about me and art at the same time. Somehow I feel I sully myself with any self promotion.

I'd much rather talk about the bird coming to land on my shoulder a few weeks ago. I just felt that if it did any good maybe I could help relieve any regrets you may have/had about not attending the class is all.

rs allen
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Mar. 15, 2012 4:55 pm

I get it. And I appreciate it. I don't hear self promotion on your part, but I can't speak for others, and so, I get it. This is not a good place for sharing. There be beasties about looking to consume our souls. But sometimes I just let it happen is all. Doesn't always look that way I s'pose.

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.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am

Quote .ren:

(...Thank you Thom and Co. for creating this fucked up software that decides for me how many spaces I can have between lines.)

My sentiments exactly. It’s so bloody annoying. You can’t add spaces between words, either. I thought maybe their Compose Tips would help, but I don’t see anything there that would address the problem.

To see what the original looked like, I found What to Remember When Waking online elsewhere— much better, ren. ;-)

Sometimes I wonder whether free verse poems offered in narrow lines, broken up in small bits, actually serves the sound and sense of poetry, or if it’s nothing but “playing the role of poetry,” again. Lots of poems, or so it seems to me, could just as well have been written as standard, prose texts, without losing anything. But today, it’s as if at some point we decided that there’s a place for lyricism, rhythm, and metaphor, that is, poetry —in poems— and a place for plain talk— in prose writing, and never the twain shall meet.

With that in mind, take the last few lines of What to Remember When Walking— could it just as easily look like this, “...What shape waits in the seed of you to grow and spread its branches against a future sky? Is it waiting in the fertile sea? In the trees beyond the house? In the life you can imagine for yourself? In the open and lovely white page on the writing desk?” and still work as poetry, because the rhythm and metaphor remain; and is it not equally good as lovely, fine prose writing? Could not a Wendell Berry or Annie Dillard have written it?

“I come into the peace of wild things who do not tax their lives with forethought of grief... For a time I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.” —Wendell Berry

Would it be better like this?—

“I come into the peace
Of wild things who
do not tax their lives
with forethought of grief…

For a time I rest
in the grace
of the world,
and I am free.”

Or, does not that rant by Marge Percy belong just as well in prose paragraphs, without loss of effect?

I am old. Bear with me.

Anyway, free associating here, “... In the open and lovely white page on the writing desk:” that general question of the poem, coupled with your references to Annie Dillard, reminds me of a little thought I had: Both our Cowardly Dentist and Annie Dillard stalk wild things, but in wholly different spirits of the hunt. Our dentist seeks trophies— decapitated, lifeless heads of animals he can mount on his walls as exhibits representing his conquest over nature and the wild; Annie Dillard is happy just to get a glimpse of something wild, one validating that “...Our life is a faint tracing on the surface of mystery,” a glimpse that becomes her seed that “grows and spreads” on the “open and lovely white page” on her writing desk. And with her glimpses, coupled with her poetic/philosophic imagination, she captures in her book the intricacy, life and complexity of the wild that the dentist, with his crude goals, never even dreamed existed. He is a “clumsy sadist” producing death; she is a lover, a dancer, a spy— she’s all about thanksgiving and praise, and yet she never ignores death. She’s no sentimentalist: Her story of the Giant water bug comes to mind, for example.

I’m not sure how to reconcile my anti-Spiritualist, anti-religionist side with my love of that book. I used to say her writing style itself, how it makes you feel you’re in a place you want to stay for hours on end, offered enough of an excuse. But the thing is, when I read Pilgrim I accept metaphor and let go of my secular imperative, and that makes it an experience worth enjoying. And besides, she’s never dogmatic. No authoritarianism ever seeps out between those lines. It’s all just magic, the literary kind.

Apparently, Annie Dillard has gone and become a Catholic. It’s dismaying, for me, but I’m sure she has her reasons.

Zenzoe
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

I think you too have brought this discussion full circle back to the dentist. I'd kind of like to leave it there.

Just a comment. I have given up trying to reconcile the beauty I can find in the way some can put words together and the actual person and what they do with their lives. I've never been one to go out of my way to seek out a maker of words. Maybe that goes back to my early years of reading where most of the authors were long gone. I connected to the words in the books. It wasn't until I began to write myself that it dawned on me that the words came from some unique individual's mind. The words left written in books said something, albeit mysterious, about that mind. Yet even so, I didn't go seeking to actually meet that mind in the flesh in hopes of getting at that mystery. I like mystery. It stimulates me to wonder and imagine.

I think fiction, or even the poetic writing about stalking the wild at Tinker's Creek, can be reality on a finer scale, because a writer will in achieving an extended poetry of expression, listen to that subconscious other world that I hear Whyte talking about in many of his poems in that collection I been recently dipping into now and again. The House of Belonging.

I don't know why poets put their words into a visual verse form. I simply assume they have their reasons. I don't need writing to be that way. Sometimes it's even a nuisance to me. I can get the same rhythmic and imaginative affect from reading paragraphs of prose. Even long paragraphs that go for pages. But maybe that's not true for others. Maybe the poets are just thinking about all readers and how to share with all the differences. Learned attention span may be a factor, I don't know. Just guessing. I also assume that at least some poets are reaching out and trying to share their inner thoughts with others, to communicate in a most intimate way. And I appreciate them for that. As I understand it, writing was originally invented by accountants to keep track of things in the growing complexities of hierarchies. Using it to do something intimately artistic was to me a very creative human act, and perhaps even a courageous one. Not every human appreciates it, nor need they.

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.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am
Quote .ren:
I think you too have brought this discussion full circle back to the dentist. I'd kind of like to leave it there.

Fair enough. I agree. :-)

Btw, Nigel, the webmaster, tells me that the reason for not allowing extra line breaks and extra spaces between words is that it becomes annoying to others to see extra white space between text, or to that effect. He says the rule is standard across the internet. I wouldn't know.

Bye bye for now.

Zenzoe
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

EEK, I posted a long post to the wrong thread!

Ok, I'll say something.

I haven't found what Nigel says to be true, but I haven't been posting elsewhere much lately. It wasn't true in the board I administered, for instance.

If true of the internet as crowd behavior, and if Nigel believes that, guess what that says about our combined ability to be free and creative on the internet? Nigel controls the software, Nigel decides the norms. We are constrained by something we cannot control, the software of the boards. Creativity is possible within constraints, of course, but where will the crowd go? (I can't stand to post on the comparatively even restrictive software of Facebook, haven't even looked at Twitter, or any of the other social formats.) And where does it all go if that's where the crowd goes? See what I'm saying? Just a lament.

Yes, bye for now.

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.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am
Quote .ren:

EEK, wrong thread!


It had better be. For a minute there, I thought I'd been effectively dismissed, so that you could continue without me on this thread. I won't tell you what I said to myself about that! Ha HAH!

Zenzoe
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Other then the obvious short comings, one of things I do throughly enjoy about this medium is the chance to be exposed to and reflect on the musings of those who we'd likely never cross paths with in this life time. Ahem, I guess that's my poor attempt at a thanks for the effort ya'll putting your thoughts in words.

As the thread seemed be ending on a writers note, I'll also leave (at least) for the moment with this quote from the 'Apocaloypse' thread:

A post from bamboo;

"Dear Writer,If your fingers are tired of so much typing on air, and the sun’s in your blood but not in your hair, and good weather is just an exception, and deep down so were you before all the prescriptions…

If you’ve lost count of seasons, and cuss out global warming for Decembers in May, for all the reading you still haven’t done, in the last thousand years oflonely words on your back; and all the dishes of the world—melting down in your sink, and babies that haven’t been born—always crying, the cat missing for days, the bills still unpaid, ’cause you’re not in it for the money, are you?

If you don’t even have time to change the music on your old MP3, but it’s okay ’cause this is how you got to memorize Beethoven and now you catch yourself humming it when no one’s around to misunderstand, and you remember that Beethoven was deaf—just like you on most days, while the genie is stuck in a bottle in Bali—at a genies’ retreat. Who needs them anyway, you can’t trust creatures with half their body missing…

And if you’re trapped in someone else’s wrinkles and wondering if there’s been a misunderstanding, cause the last time you checked you were only 19, and you’ve been stuck on the highway of time all these years, paying your toll in dream currency, trying to put into words why people in ads are always so goddamn happy about eating yogurt…

That writer, saturnine You, with dark ‘n’ bright circles round your eyes from so many late-night walks on the moon, and scissors instead of fingers, and clumsy metaphors instead of gloves, on days like today only screaming comes easy, but you’ve been colonized and it’s hard to be wild in the concrete jungle, so put your shirt back on, maybe go for a walk?

Meanwhile, in your veins, not even tree sap. And deep down you wish that all wishes came with the right degree of amnesia because we first need to forget the impossible in order to attempt it."

http://www.rebellesociety.com/2013/05/20/the-writers-manifesto/?fb_action_ids=10202373109830594&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=aggregation&fb_aggregation_id=288381481237582

- See more at: http://www.thomhartmann.com/forum/2013/11/conscious-apocalypse-outliving-our-ruling-institutions?page=2#comment-247069

rs allen
Joined:
Mar. 15, 2012 4:55 pm

One of my favorite lines from a movie -- the script was written by James Cameron. The movie, Strange Days.

Philo Gant: "Paranoia is just reality on a finer scale."

.ren's picture
.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am

Beautiful.

.ren's picture
.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am
Quote .ren:

One of my favorite lines from a movie -- the script was written by James Cameron. The movie, Strange Days.

Philo Gant: "Paranoia is just reality on a finer scale."

Thanks a lot— those just might be the kindest, most empathetic, caring words you've ever directed at me on this thread.

See ya'—

Zenzoe
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

I disagree with Philo, by the way (or would that be James Cameron, the script writer?). I just liked the quote. It's so self serving for a paranoic. You'd have to have known my mother the way I did to understand why. High sensitivity to environment and psychosis are not the same coin.

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.ren
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Apr. 1, 2010 6:50 am

Just wanted to share what my Congressman posted in his newsletter.

You have no doubt heard about the recent tragic and illegal killing of Cecil the Lion, a 13-year-old lion, dominant male of his pride, and one of Zimbabwe’s most beloved symbols of wildlife and an important driver of tourism.

The American hunter, along with hired professionals, illegally lured Cecil out of Hwange National Park and shot him, allegedly without a permit, and collected the head and skin. The hunters also removed a GPS collar that Cecil was wearing as part of an ongoing research project directed by Oxford University in the UK, and that had been providing scientists with important data on the behavior and biology of lions. According to Oxford University, Cecil’s pride was one of the most studied in the history of research into lion behavior.

In light of this tragedy, I have signed on as a co-sponsor of H.R. 2697, the Rare Cats and Canids Act of 2015. Beyond Cecil, over two thirds of the world’s cat species and one third of canids (dog) are recognized as species in need of protection under federal or international law. Many of these vulnerable species sit at the top of the food chain, serving as ‘umbrella species,’ meaning that the health of these animals is an indicator for the health of the ecosystem as a whole. By supporting the recovery of these specific umbrella species, we can have tremendous impacts on entire ecosystems.

H.R. 2697 would provide conservation resources to the Department of the Interior for cat and canine species existing outside the United States that are designated on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)’s Red List as near threatened, vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered. Through the establishment of a conservation fund, the act will provide resources to local wildlife management authorities and organizations that demonstrate longevity and sustainability in their management practices.

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MrsBJLee
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Feb. 17, 2012 8:45 am

I will be sure to communicate to my congressmen on that legislation should it come up for a vote- thanks for alerting us on that Mrs BJLEE

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stwo
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Are the forrest firefighters and community firefighters evacuating communities and trying to save homes hiring? That's positive, right? Insurance adjusters covering all the increased claims are in extra hour compensation, so THAT's positive too. Utilities are making more money in the summer as people jack their A/C usage and associated costs. Water bottlers are making a killing as the reservoirs shrink and water costs get priced per market supply, -positive.

As earth slides closer to Venus 2.0, the population boom will reverse and shortages of labor will abound, as occurred with the black plague.

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Kinda partial to that particular wood myself. [and red oak for woodworking projects]

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

btw, going to Amazon, Kindle poetry has a slew of poetry freebies, The Raven was in my last search, the Poe classic worth reading some parts aloud even if it's only for yourself.

Alice Addertongue's letter to the editor in 1714 is worth reading sometime too. Ben Franklin was the editor (and author of the letter, satire gold really)

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douglaslee
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Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

I agree with that coque galaxy a8 etui galaxy a8

I have to agree here.I have to agree here.

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toto070
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Aug. 24, 2015 7:27 pm

We Know How Far Trump Will Go - How Far Will Republicans Go?

Thom plus logo Colonel Vindman's testimony pretty much proves that Trump was trying to shake down Ukraine for information on Biden, and that the Republicans are doing everything they can to cover up this extortion attempt.
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