Surely you lefties see the cronyism here...

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http://www.forbes.com/sites/instituteforjustice/2015/07/24/new-jersey-ba...

For decades, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark has preserved cemeteries for the faithful and their families. To raise money to maintain many of the ageing monuments, the Archdiocese began selling headstones and other funeral monuments.

Feeling threatened by the competition, rival monument builders successfully lobbied lawmakers to ban the Archdiocese from selling headstones to their own parishioners. Not only is the law blatantly anticompetitive, the ban is highly unusual: In 47 states, cemeteries can sell headstones, just not in New Jersey. Now the Archdiocese and the Institute for Justice have filed a federal lawsuit against the state, which could strike a blow against economic protectionism.

Covering 763 acres, the Archdiocese’s 11 cemeteries are the final resting place for nearly 1 million people. Closed to the public, only parishioners and their relatives can be buried in Archdiocese cemeteries. (A small number of Coptic Christians, who fled religious persecution in Egypt, are also interred, after the Archdiocese determined they are “in communion” with the Catholic Church.)

With their cemeteries ever expanding and ageing (two predate the Civil War), the Archdiocese needed funds for upkeep. In a clever innovation, the Archdiocese began offering “inscription-rights:” Parishioners purchase a private mausoleum or headstone and the Archdiocese inscribes it. But parishioners do not own the monument. Instead, under the contract, the Archdiocese owns the mausoleum or headstone and is perpetually obligated to inscribe, install, repair and maintain the monument. Inscription-rights run the gamut from $1,200 for simple headstones to over $300,000 for more ornate private mausoleums.

Maine's picture
Maine
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Jul. 8, 2015 4:26 pm

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Yeah, so what does this have to do with "lefties"? Cronyism is most typically practiced by conservative politicians pandering to the businss community. Unfortunatley there has been a trend in the last couple of decades for Democrats to buy into the corporatism on the right to the detriment of us all but those corporate Dems are not liberals in any sense of the word.

I really don't know what your point is unless it is to illustrate the danger of allowing undue business influence on politics. If that's the case then welcome to the light.

mdhess's picture
mdhess
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Apr. 9, 2010 11:43 pm
Quote mdhess:

Yeah, so what does this have to do with "lefties"? Cronyism is most typically practiced by conservative politicians pandering to the businss community. Unfortunatley there has been a trend in the last couple of decades for Democrats to buy into the corporatism on the right to the detriment of us all but those corporate Dems are not liberals in any sense of the word.

I really don't know what your point is unless it is to illustrate the danger of allowing undue business influence on politics. If that's the case then welcome to the light.

I just thought some of you might count them as the gravestone makers union and give them a pass because of it.

Maine's picture
Maine
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Jul. 8, 2015 4:26 pm

I thought regulation was good?

gumball's picture
gumball
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Dec. 12, 2013 11:02 am

Your article says they lobbied lawmakers, no mention of unions.

mdhess's picture
mdhess
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Apr. 9, 2010 11:43 pm
Quote mdhess:

Your article says they lobbied lawmakers, no mention of unions.

What's the difference between a union and a bunch of people in the same trade working together?

Maine's picture
Maine
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Jul. 8, 2015 4:26 pm
Quote Maine:

What's the difference between a union and a bunch of people in the same trade working together?

The difference is simple. Labor unions have a heavy layer of bosses, staff, Pension managers, and lobbyists to pay for. Much like the corporate executives the lefties rant about all day.

Public sector union are a whole different animal. Their unfunded pension liabilities are breaking the back of every city in America. Their members will have to live with large reuctions in benefits and municipalities are quickly turning to private contractors and part time workers to stop the bleeding.

Dexterous's picture
Dexterous
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Apr. 9, 2013 9:35 am
Quote Maine:
Quote mdhess:

Your article says they lobbied lawmakers, no mention of unions.

What's the difference between a union and a bunch of people in the same trade working together?

Dexterous' clueless, irrelevant comment aside; businesses have associations like the Chamber of Coimmerce. The difference is that unions negotiate with employers for worker benefits while trade associations lobby policy makers for favorable policies -- like preventing the Archdiocese from providing grave markers for instance. It's crony capitalism that has nothing to do with unions, per se.

mdhess's picture
mdhess
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Apr. 9, 2010 11:43 pm
Quote mdhess:
Quote Maine:
Quote mdhess:

Your article says they lobbied lawmakers, no mention of unions.

What's the difference between a union and a bunch of people in the same trade working together?

Dexterous' clueless, irrelevant comment aside; businesses have associations like the Chamber of Coimmerce. The difference is that unions negotiate with employers for worker benefits while trade associations lobby policy makers for favorable policies -- like preventing the Archdiocese from providing grave markers for instance. It's crony capitalism that has nothing to do with unions, per se.

But unions also lobby policy makers for favorable policies. And sometimes unions dont negotiate with employers. (Isnt the taxi business unionized?)

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Maine
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Jul. 8, 2015 4:26 pm

What Do Democrats Really Want?

Thom plus logo Thomas Friedman, the confused billionaire, told us decades ago that "free trade" is what made the Lexus a successful product when, in fact, it was decades of Japanese government subsidies and explicit tariffs that did so.
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