Retiree Beware

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If you're a retiree soon to be a buyer, buyer beware has some extra caution attached.

After a horrific winter, Northeast and Midwest boomers are coming in waves to seek warm weather in America’s Southeast. Homes in the cold Northeast and Midwest are being sold and, with cash in hand for many boomers, the search is on for a warm retirement location for their golden years.

Most guides to retirement rank places by cost-of-living, climate, cultural offerings or personal interests. Few offer any information on the environment. So before you decide where to invest, it is important to see how prospective communities have handled everything from massive, Chinese-owned pig farms in North Carolina, decaying H-Bomb plants in South Carolina and Tennessee, or antiquated coal fired power plants in Florida. Realtors and developers do not warn boomers about environmental threats lurking near their dream houses in the sunshine. They are either unaware or simply choose not to discuss these issues with their buyers. Continue reading Boomers’ Environment Guide for Retirement: The Lure of America’s Southeast

- See more at: http://www.dcbureau.org/#sthash.dfOhmnfH.dpuf

PA has an underground fire smoldering for two years now approaching a nuclear waste dump. Uranium waste was not always accounted for nor regulated for containment.

Toxic waste is not always disclosed by realtors, especially to retirees with a 20 year expected life span and clusters taking at least 20 years to show in radiological diagnostics at oncology clinics. If you mention your grandkids might be playing in the fields or garden or creeks, they might warn you. Maybe teen Hazmat gear is available. Your water might be poison too, but the word is out on that. Toxic water and soil are now a known risk, CO detectors and radiation detectors are still a good idea, or use your passport. 3rd world countries will be cheaper, and now they might be safer.

douglaslee's picture
douglaslee
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Comments

cont'd:

In most states, there are requirements to disclose the toxic dump under the seller’s beautiful golf course home. But the South is a regulation-adverse region where unsuspecting new residents may end up paying a very hefty price for the lack of environmental enforcement and protection.

The Chem-Nuclear Site, Barnwell County, SC.

Maybe it is the culture, but many Southerners put verbal bandages on the god-awful to make it sound better. In South Carolina, for example, the state’s U.S. senators actually got cold war nuclear waste redefined into a less dangerous category to make it easier to become a nuclear waste dump.

Just to be clear – the South is not California. It may be warm, but it is also an environmental minefield, and most of the politicians in charge want to keep it that way. Every Southern State has serious environmental problems that relate to some of the dirtiest industries – like coal. Looking the other way has provided jobs and enormous wealth to a relative few. Industries and utilities along with a political willingness that goes back decades to welcome dangerous government facilities – like the Savannah River Site in South Carolina or the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, not to mention numerous military bases and scores of smaller sites – have left a legacy that has taken a huge environmental and health toll on the region.

In a big way, the patriotic South took an environmental hit for all of the United States. It was a mindset that these facilities would be good for the country and bring high-paying jobs to the region.

Air and water pollution from giant farms, coal waste storage, and the defacto home for nuclear waste are just a few of the constant threats to property values. The South is not alone in this economy vs. the environment trade-off. Giant factory farms are all over America’s heartland. But regulation in the South is less stringent.

A lot of blacks live in the south. Black men if they reach 65 have a life expectancy of 70 + 10 months. Environmental degradation sometimes takes a long time to kill. Slow poisoning is still poisoning. Dickheads in the gop want a retirement age of 70 now. Black men would get 10 months of checks after a lifetime of contributions.

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douglaslee
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Radioisotopes are a trivial threat. There have been the very rare cases as in Brazil where someone took apart a medical isotope source and distributed the material.

And yes you could buy a dosimeter off eBay for $25 if you are paranoid. Radiation unlike the thousands of other carcinogens & toxins in the environment is easy to measure. You will quickly find you were afraid of nothing because you would read trivial levels of radiation anywhere you go.

The biggest worry by far is all the carcinogens, mutagens, teratogens, poisons, toxins, heavy metals, bacteria & virus that you find in the air you breath, the food you eat & the water you drink anywhere and everywhere you live in the modern city. Significantly reduces life expectancy.

Instant-RunOff-...
Joined:
Jun. 17, 2015 11:41 am

I've lived for a time in Florida, graduated from St. Thomas University (Miami-Dade, when it was then Biscayne College) and all I can say for younger families, avoid FL at all costs possible if you care about your childrens' education and what the longterm lack of it they'll receive will cost them over the long haul. Avoid states whose pols willfully eschew their moral and legal responsibilties to provide the services they have (already) paid for through their taxes, esp. when the so-called "saving the taxpayers' 'hard-earned dollars'" is nothing but a ruse for doing nothing, spending nothing when it should be spent and following that up with chest-thumping self-paeans (speeches) all designed to gull even more gullible voters into figuratively slash their own fiscal wrists. How much austerity can we afford?

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Steven PBarrett
Joined:
Jan. 24, 2016 3:36 pm

Radon was my main concern. 1 out of every 15 people are exposed to it by one CDC estimate. Then:

Scientists estimate that about 20,000 lung cancer deaths per year are related to radon.
Those deaths do help keep Social Security solvent. I saw a 10 conspiracies that were true article. (The Lusitania WAS carrying weapons in WW1) The FBI was spiking booze with Isopropyl alcohol and lighter fluid, killing anyone buying bootleg booze during prohibition. So killing people with naturally occurring radon would hardly get noticed. The Syphilitic purposeful infection study was one I already knew about. Wallace's running mate wanted to shoot down American passenger planes to blame Castro so he could invade, so always remember, citizens are just extras in the grand theater production known as the USA.

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douglaslee
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Radon is something you get from granite in your basement or from the natural gas that comes into your home. A lot of Radon released in California from that massive gas leak they had there.

The EPA's claims about lung cancer & Radon have been debunked many times, indeed publicly available data confims this, i.e.:

"...Keith Pickering

February 2, 2016 at 3:56 PM

The EPA publishes a map showing the expected level of radon in homes in each county. (http://www.epa.gov/radon/find-information-about-local-radon-zones-and-radon-programs#radonmap). Each county is assigned a zone, with Zone 1 having the most radon and Zone 3 the least.

Last year I wrote to EPA to get the actual county-level data for each county in tabular form. Conveniently it was broken down the same way the census breaks down counties (there were only a few differences, as some cities in VA are counted as “counties” and had changed status in the intervening years; but those were easy corrections to make.) Then I weighted each county by its population and derived a population-weighted radon zone number for each state. This was a fractional number between 1 and 3.

US lung cancer data by state is available from the CDC. https://nccd.cdc.gov/uscs/cancersbystateandregion.aspx

US smoking rates by state is available by survey.
https://www.tobaccofreekids.org/research/factsheets/pdf/0176.pdf

The mean elevation of each state is available from the USGS via Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_elevation

The results:

The correlation of smoking with lung cancer is clear and unmistakable. The correlation coefficient between smoking rates and lung cancer rates is +.75.

The correlation of elevation with lung cancer is clear and unmistakable. The correlation coefficient between elevation and lung cancer rates is -.72 (meaning higher elevation correlates with less lung cancer).

The correlation of radon levels with lung cancer is unclear, insignificant, and if anything, shows hormesis. The correlation coefficient between radon zone and lung cancer is +.13, and since a low-numbered zone has more radon, the positive correlation indicates that the higher-numbered zones (less radon) had more lung cancer.

The EPA’s statement that radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer is flat-out false..."

Instant-RunOff-...
Joined:
Jun. 17, 2015 11:41 am
January 2015 is National Radon Action Month. Swat Environmental is giving out FREE Radon Test Kits to homeowners, visit SWAT-Radon.com or call 1-800-420-3881 to order your kit. Radon is a deadly natural, invisible and odorless radioactive gas that can cause health issues. Radon is actually more dangerous than carbon monoxide. By testing your home for radon you can reduce your family's risk of lung cancer. A lot of the Health Agencies across the states have joined together during National Radon Action Month to give awareness of the leading cause of lung cancer. The American Lung Association, Centers for Disease Control and National Cancer Institute are in agreement that radon is a worldwide health problem and encourage radon testing during the "National Radon Action Month". Radon gas is not isolated to certain geographical areas or home types.
The Surgeon General signed on to the above data too, but it's a year old now. Of course any uranium disposed underground and breaking down into radon would be on public records because US corporations are reponsible and never hide their waste disposal practices, especially the toxic ones. The National Tobacco Institute debunked the toxic chemicals and gas said to be generated when tobacco is incinerated proving the Surgeon General wrong then too.

Chlordane was safe when my dad used to spray it on our bushes underneath our windows before we had A/C. The crickets were loud and all night. It was pulled from the market after it was deemed carcinogenic. Multiple Myeloma is a blood cancer originating in the bone marrow traced to chlordane. My Dad died of multiple myeloma in 2002. I am not worried about radon, my family and I don't live in the US. The same Industrial Hygienists that wrote of radon have a chapter on mold. We have dogs that do mold inspection services with a very high degree of successful detection. Like I said, we don't live in the US and our dogs are not likely to be bribed by big chemical companies facing liability. A US company facing such a dog just might try to find a bitch in heat that suddenly happened to be in the neighborhood.

douglaslee's picture
douglaslee
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

I've done quite a bit of radon testing and remediation. What a scam. Like printing money. Never had any elevated readings when selling my homes - Its easy to make sure the tests come out clean.

There has never been a verified case where home radon was linked to an occurrence of cancer. Not one case.

The 4 picocurie/liter action level is completely arbitrary.

In fact, the late University of Pittsburgh professor Bernard Cohen has done many years of rigorous research and actually identified an inverse relationship between radon concentrations and chances of getting lung cancer.

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stwo
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Very little is known about radiation and its long term affects. Studies could be made but have been minimal. Nuclear workers at nuclear power plants have their dose tracked but if they die of cancer that triggers nothing. A neighbor of mine that is a 40 year flight attendant had to have cataracts removed. I asked her if it was related to 40 years of receiving high altitude dose and she had never heard of that. Radon levels in homes in Colorado are very high. You cannot sell a house without having mitigation done to remove it. Radon in homes was discovered when nuclear power plant workers were setting off radiation monitors at nuclear power plants in PA that they worked at.

Legend
Joined:
Nov. 27, 2012 6:46 am

In the OP many golf course laden retirement communities were built nearby or even over toxic dumps that have not been publicized. The uranium dump that caught fire is related to radon because uranium breaks down into radon as one of its 'daughters' (radiation terminology). I said retirees beware not for retiree risk, since 20 year life span will reduce the risk, but grandkids visiting getting exposed to toxic waste by playing in the basement or fields or creeks is something I would be concerned about.

it becomes clear that humans have unlimited capabilities to adulterate the environment. Because homebuyers fall in love with a community or specific house, a lurking local environmental threat might not even make it into the decision making matrix. That is a huge financial mistake that could have unexpected economic consequences.

In most states, there are requirements to disclose the toxic dump under the seller’s beautiful golf course home. But the South is a regulation-adverse region where unsuspecting new residents may end up paying a very hefty price for the lack of environmental enforcement and protection.

The Chem-Nuclear Site, Barnwell County, SC.

Maybe it is the culture, but many Southerners put verbal bandages on the god-awful to make it sound better. In South Carolina, for example, the state’s U.S. senators actually got cold war nuclear waste redefined into a less dangerous category to make it easier to become a nuclear waste dump.

Just to be clear – the South is not California. It may be warm, but it is also an environmental minefield, and most of the politicians in charge want to keep it that way. Every Southern State has serious environmental problems that relate to some of the dirtiest industries – like coal. Looking the other way has provided jobs and enormous wealth to a relative few. Industries and utilities along with a political willingness that goes back decades to welcome dangerous government facilities – like the Savannah River Site in South Carolina or the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, not to mention numerous military bases and scores of smaller sites – have left a legacy that has taken a huge environmental and health toll on the region.

In a big way, the patriotic South took an environmental hit for all of the United States. It was a mindset that these facilities would be good for the country and bring high-paying jobs to the region.

Air and water pollution from giant farms, coal waste storage, and the defacto home for nuclear waste are just a few of the constant threats to property values. The South is not alone in this economy vs. the environment trade-off. Giant factory farms are all over America’s heartland. But regulation in the South is less stringent.

Virginia

Virginia is a beautiful state sustained by government jobs and largely run by greedy corporations that manage to find ways to get greedy politicians to do their bidding. Front Royal, Virginia, is located at the north entrance to the picturesque Skyline Drive. It was once home to one of the most polluted sites in the state.

The now shuddered Avtex Fibers plant had been one of the biggest single polluters in American history and had once during World War II poisoned the Shenandoah River all the way to West Virginia – some 34 miles. After a five-year struggle and a visit from Ted Koppel’s Nightline, the plant became one of the last major Superfund Sites in the United States.

On the coast below the Outer Banks sits Camp Lejeune, a huge, sprawling Marine Corps Base where men, women and children were unwitting victims. From 1957 to 1987, the story of Camp Lejeune and the people who were sickened there has been told in pieces. Veterans lost children to rare diseases and up to a million people were potentially affected over the years. The Marine Corps continually put people in harm’s way without warning. In April 2009, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), a branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announced that the Marine Corps had for years systematically misrepresented the nature and scope of historical water contamination at the site. The military has long denied that water saturated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE), degreasing and dry cleaning solvents now known to have permeated the base’s drinking and bathing water systems for decades, was responsible for the multitude of cancers and other rare health problems experienced by former base residents and civilians living near the fence line.

All those kids dying from exotic diseases was probably just a coincidence, right?

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douglaslee
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

Radon 222

St. Mary's School in Port Hope was evacuated because of extraordinarily high radon levels. Radioactive fill had to be removed, at public expense, from hundreds of homes and gardens. Even today, there are over 200,000 tons of radioactive debris lying about the town of Port Hope in open ravines, easily accessible to children and to pets. Eldorado Nuclear Limited, the crown corporation whose radioactive wastes had been generously donated to the eager townsfolk for construction purposes many years earlier, has recently promised -- under the prodding of the Ontario Environment Department -- to finish cleaning up the mess sometime during the next few years.

Acceptable Doses?

According to all scientific evidence, there is no such thing as a "safe dose" of radiation. Every dose of radiation will cause a corresponding increase in cancers and other diseases. Spreading a given dose out to a larger number of people -- so that each individual dose is smaller -- does not reduce the number of resulting illnesses. In fact, in the case of alpha radiation, there is very strong evidence from many different quarters that spreading a dose out among more people actually increases the total number of cancers and other diseases. Uranium and most of its by-products, including thorium, radium, radon and most of the radon daughters fall into this category of alpha-emitting substances.

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douglaslee
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm
Quote stwo:

I've done quite a bit of radon testing and remediation. What a scam. Like printing money. Never had any elevated readings when selling my homes - Its easy to make sure the tests come out clean.

There has never been a verified case where home radon was linked to an occurrence of cancer. Not one case.

The 4 picocurie/liter action level is completely arbitrary.

In fact, the late University of Pittsburgh professor Bernard Cohen has done many years of rigorous research and actually identified an inverse relationship between radon concentrations and chances of getting lung cancer.

Right, and there is no climate change either.

Tampering with a test will land you in jail. Sure you can open the windows and turn on fans during the testing period. Shows what type of person you are.

http://www.radon.com/radon/radon_facts.html

Legend
Joined:
Nov. 27, 2012 6:46 am

Of course there is climate change. 100% beneficial so far. No change on that in sight.

Tampering??? I am aghast at the very idea. (But jail time? No, I dont think so.)

Representative sampling under real world conditions-- well sure, of course.

Nice link by company who makes big bucks on the Radon scam. I have no reason to doubt a single word on their website.

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stwo
Joined:
Jul. 31, 2007 3:01 pm

America: Meet Your Overlord Rupert Murdoch...

Thom plus logo The main lesson that we've learned so far from the impeachment hearings is that if Richard Nixon had had a billionaire like Rupert Murdoch with a television network like Fox News behind him, he never would've resigned and America would have continued to be presided over by a criminal.
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