Years later our troops are still there. Their opinions are mixed about whether they should stay, but the consensus seems to be that things as they are aren't acceptable.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/in-afghanistan-a-mounting-sense-of-f...

Christian Science Monitor
Anna Mulrine Grobe​ {12-4-16)

Some worry about a return to Taliban days. But others take a bracing but longer view, seeing the past few years as merely the beginning of a twisting path that they never expected to finish in a generation.
“A lot of people are losing patience, saying, ‘Yeah, it’s time to pull out. We did enough,’ ” says Naderi of US forces. “But it’s going to have a big impact on the women of Afghanistan if US troops leave the country.”

...

So what sort of presence might the US military leave in Afghanistan to avoid abandoning it altogether?
Ideally, it would be the State Department, with the Pentagon taking a big step back, Dempsey says. The US military would ensure no sanctuaries for terrorists but would largely withdraw and tolerate a Taliban presence that had come to some peace agreement with the government.

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