YES! – Education is part of the commons & shouldn’t be exploited for profit.
94% (46 votes)
NO! – Schools should be allowed to make as much money as the market will allow.
6% (3 votes)
Total votes: 49

Comments

washnwmn's picture
washnwmn 2 years 38 weeks ago

I was surprised when approached to sign a move to get charter schools on the ballot this election. Washington state has generally had a pretty good school system. I did not sign it, naturally, but seeing the push to get these really brought home the reality of this kind of takeover in this country. From the top down to elementary. There are plenty of private schools around, mainly associated with churches, and they usually have outstanding curriculums, so I don't see a need for any others but especially with profit as the motive rather than learning.

PLSzymeczek's picture
PLSzymeczek 2 years 38 weeks ago

If schools want to speculate to make a profit, they should get private investors. That goes for elementary school right up through college.

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Corporations outspend taxpayers in Congress...

You may be surprised to learn that we spend about $2 billion dollars a year on our dysfunctional Congress. However, it's even more surprising to learn that corporate lobbyists spend even more to buy off our federal lawmakers.

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