YES! - Knowledge is power & the internet should be available for all.
92% (49 votes)
NO! - Access to the internet is not a right. It’s a luxury.
8% (4 votes)
Total votes: 53

Comments

markincorsicana 2 years 6 weeks ago

As more people rely on the internet for their news due to the abrogation of major media's responsibility to cover real news instead of the cultural flotsam and jetsam that passes for important and worthy of attention in an empire circling the drain; quick and uncensored access to the internet should be the right of an informed citizenry. Or maybe internet impedance is just another way to keep the sheeple grazing in pastures depleted of any nutrient that might stimulate the brain.

Sharon on 2nd Thought's picture
Sharon on 2nd T... 2 years 6 weeks ago

My access is limited to one hour per day at the public library. I can't afford home Internet. I rely on web-sites for diversity from around the world. I can join a chat-room or web community (such as Thom's) and communicate with someone from the other side of the globe or from across town.

clarencetreat's picture
clarencetreat 2 years 6 weeks ago

“Basic Fundamental Right?” VERY loaded question! Sounds too much like “unalienable rights” in the Constitution, so I would conclude, NO. I would put it in the same category as having the right to access to news papers, telephone and tv service, and transportation. People consider these factors when they decide where to live, and there are still many areas in these services are not available, yet people choose to live there. The public and private sectors provide these services based on demand and economics and I think should continue to be the guiding reasons to providing internet access.

Add comment

Login or register to post comments

Time to Rethink the War on Terror

Thom plus logo

When Eric Holder eventually steps down as Attorney General, he will leave behind a complicated legacy, some of it tragic, like his decision not to prosecute Wall Street after the financial crisis, and his all-out war on whistleblowers like Edward Snowden.

From The Thom Hartmann Reader:
"Thom Hartmann is a literary descendent of Ben Franklin and Tom Paine. His unflinching observations and deep passion inspire us to explore contemporary culture, politics, and economics; challenge us to face the facts of the societies we are creating; and empower us to demand a better world for our children and grandchildren."
John Perkins, author of the New York Times bestselling book Confessions of an Economic Hit Man
From Unequal Protection, 2nd Edition:
"Hartmann combines a remarkable piece of historical research with a brilliant literary style to tell the grand story of corporate corruption and its consequences for society with the force and readability of a great novel."
David C. Korten, author of When Corporations Rule the World and Agenda for A New Economy
From The Thom Hartmann Reader:
"Thom Hartmann channels the best of the American Founders with voice and pen. His deep attachment to a democratic civil society is just the medicine America needs."
Tom Hayden, author of The Long Sixties and director, Peace and Justice Resource Center.