YES! - Knowledge is power & the internet should be available for all.
92% (49 votes)
NO! - Access to the internet is not a right. It’s a luxury.
8% (4 votes)
Total votes: 53

Comments

markincorsicana 1 year 50 weeks ago

As more people rely on the internet for their news due to the abrogation of major media's responsibility to cover real news instead of the cultural flotsam and jetsam that passes for important and worthy of attention in an empire circling the drain; quick and uncensored access to the internet should be the right of an informed citizenry. Or maybe internet impedance is just another way to keep the sheeple grazing in pastures depleted of any nutrient that might stimulate the brain.

Sharon on 2nd Thought's picture
Sharon on 2nd T... 1 year 50 weeks ago

My access is limited to one hour per day at the public library. I can't afford home Internet. I rely on web-sites for diversity from around the world. I can join a chat-room or web community (such as Thom's) and communicate with someone from the other side of the globe or from across town.

clarencetreat's picture
clarencetreat 1 year 50 weeks ago

“Basic Fundamental Right?” VERY loaded question! Sounds too much like “unalienable rights” in the Constitution, so I would conclude, NO. I would put it in the same category as having the right to access to news papers, telephone and tv service, and transportation. People consider these factors when they decide where to live, and there are still many areas in these services are not available, yet people choose to live there. The public and private sectors provide these services based on demand and economics and I think should continue to be the guiding reasons to providing internet access.

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A Rising Tide Only Lifts All Boats When Everyone Has a Boat.

President John F. Kennedy once said about economic development that “a rising tide lifts all boats.” Kennedy was, of course, right, but he missed something really, really important: A rising tide lifts only lifts all boats when everyone has a boat.

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