Would you like a side of the flu with your order?

Would you like a side of the flu with your order?

All around us, people are coming down with the flu – and the Centers for Disease Control warn that it could be the worst flu season in ten years. And to make matters worse, our national workplace policies are helping to spread the flu. Despite the CDC recommending people “stay home and avoid contact with other people,” most workers don’t have that option, as the United States is the only developed country that doesn’t guaranteed paid sick days to its workers.

As a result, 40% of private sector workers and 80% of low-income workers don’t get any paid sick days. In the food industry, where the chances of the flu spreading are highest, 79% of workers say they receive no paid sick leave. Our lack of protections for workers is directly responsible for more flu illnesses around the nation. As a 2009 study in the American Journal of Public Health found, there were as many as 5 million additional cases of the H1N1 flu in 2009, due to a lack of paid sick time.

Giving workers what they have earned – which is paid sick days – isn’t about workers rights. It’s about national security, and saving millions of Americans from needlessly contracting the flu when they dine out or go to the grocery store. Unfortunately, the billionaire class running Corporate America has squeezed every bit of profit they can from their workers – denying them union representation, healthcare, and paid vacations and sick leave.

This is insanity – and we should protest with our wallets and pocketbooks. Before dining out, call the restaurant and ask if they offer paid sick days to their employees. If not, then eat there at your own risk.

Comments

Palindromedary 1 year 33 weeks ago
#1

Why stop with restaurants you intend to eat at? And why stop with restaurants at all? Why not extend that to every merchant you intend to shop at...after all those employees the cashiers, etc, can all infect lots of people who shop there. Of course, other people, who are shopping could infect lots of people as well. Not much you can do about that. I like the idea of just staying home. Don't go anywhere, unless you absolutely have to.

Duct tape all windows and doors...we're all doomed! ;-/

When did they stop giving out paid sick days? I thought all companies did this...I guess maybe I was lucky if all other companies did not. But then, I haven't worked in a while so maybe they finally all stopped. Like all the other benefits...down the rabbit hole.

Kend's picture
Kend 1 year 33 weeks ago
#2

Everywhere I ever worked they gave you paid sick days. I give all my workers paid sick days and always have. Who wants a sick person in the work place. What is amazing is every seems to be sick on Fridays. Kind of weird eh. The fact is workers are not as loyal to the companies they work for anymore and the companies could care less about the employees. No one gives more than the have to on either side. Kinda sad.

David Abbot's picture
David Abbot 1 year 33 weeks ago
#3

The longer these irrational times go on, the more convinced I am that a truly socialist government is the only government that properly performs the most important function of government: to protect and help its people. And I become increasingly convinced that the single greatest enemy of both government and people, is corporations that are not very strictly controlled.

johnbest's picture
johnbest 1 year 33 weeks ago
#4

My father was a mail carrier for 27 years starting in 1937. During WWII they used to come to the house and check if my dad was really sick.

I was a federal employee for 32 years. It does not pay to abuse sick leave. When I retired, I had 2650 hours of sick leave accumulated. When I retired, they applied the sick leave toward my years of service. I received another year of service for all this sick leave which increased my retirement substantially. I have been retired now for 23 years. It pays not to abuse sick leave.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#5

I agree Thom!

Forcing a person to work or forfeit a day's wages is a threat to National Security. If you ask me sick leave should fall under workman's comp insurance as a CDC decree. Use our opulent Defense Fund to pay for it!

While you're at it, lets discourage shaking hands as a way to great people for the same National Security reason. The American Indians would raise their hand with their palms facing the other person and say "How." Sounds a lot more sanitary to me.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#6

While were at it let me put my two cents into our wonderful private health insurance system. Around 10 years ago, while working out, I gave myself an umbilical hernia. It wasn't too serious, I just noticed the bulge on my stomach after showering. No pain, just concern.

I had Kaiser insurance at the time. At that time and present time Kaiser is considered the "Cadillac" of Medical Insurance. When I went in for an appointment the first thing the Doctor had me do is lie down on my back. Without warning, he shoved his hand into my hernia pressing with all his weight to push the intestine back into my abdominal cavity. It felt like I was being stabbed. The result was a much larger hole in my abdominal wall and a very painful hernia. The Doctor explained that since he was able to shove my intestine back into the wall successfully I didn't need immediate surgery. However, now I was unable to work because I couldn't keep my intestine from falling out of the hernia. The hospital said it would take about 5-6 months to schedule my surgery and I could wear a back brace (a wide elastic belt) to keep my intestines inside while I worked. They wouldn't even approve sick leave. I had no choice but to work. While working my intestine would slowly work it's way out and get pinched between the belt and my belly. The pain would intensify to the point that I had to lie down on my back for 20 minutes every 1-2 hours working my intestine back into my abdomen and allowing circulation to return to it. After about a week of this nonsense, friends, family, and coworkers insisted I go to another Kaiser about 35 miles out of town. They were much more sympathetic and managed to schedule my surgery within 2 weeks. It was the longest 2 weeks of my life. This isn't the only horror story I know of first hand from Kaiser hospital. They also on two occasions almost deliberately killed my best friend, and also botched the Heart Operation on my mother leading to a final year of agony before her death. I wouldn't recommend this place to my worst enemy. Our private health care system sucks as much as any other I've ever heard of; and, these insurance thief's rob us of a arm and a leg to pay for it. It's a travesty. We all need to demand Single Payer, now!!

Old Blue 1 year 33 weeks ago
#7

I worked for "The Man" in one form or another (from the federal government to small startups) for many years and always had paid sick leave. Of course, I was an "exempt" employee most of those years, which meant that I was "exempt" from overtime pay on those frequent occasions when I was required to put in 50 or 60 hours per week. There was this thing called "comp time" that never seemed redeemable. One thing that was a constant across every job I had, though, was that management didn't like it when a worker called in sick. This was felt in numerous ways, but the effect was predictable. People would show up during the flu season coughing, sneezing, running fevers, because they were reluctant to be one of those "abusers". Of course the pressure is even greater on the minimum wage worker at a restaurant chain because the pay is so lousy that they probably can't make ends meet without getting in a full week, if then, and they aren't paid if they aren't on the job (infecting their co-workers and patrons). Kend mentions that workers and companies are less loyal to each other these days. It's probably a "chicken-egg" thing, but my money is on employers as the root cause of the problem. There are plenty of examples of "people centric" companies that have been abundantly rewarded by their employees for being treated decently. Hershey Chocolate and Hewlett Packard come to mind. American Enterprise is generally a cruel task master.

stecoop01's picture
stecoop01 1 year 33 weeks ago
#8

Maybe someone should remind the billionaires and their republican croonies that epidemics have a way of forcing wages to go up - an epidemic kills skilled AND unskilled laborers, creating a shortage of both; a shortage laborers forces wages to increase (anything in short supply becomes much more valuable); billionaires will have to pay more for their maids and chauffers and butlers, etc. (Or do without)

Anybody remember the Spanish flu of the 1910's, or the black plague of the 1500's?

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#9

Yes Old Blue their are may "abusers" of the system who make it hard on us all. Fortunately for me I'm not. I worked for a small company and never abused sick time. When I had my hernia my Boss was happy to help out in every way he could despite the hospitals assessment. I was very fortunate.

However, like you said I can see the problem of "abusers" form an employers POV. However, for the good of all their employees, and above all, for the good of all their customers, employers have to exercise a little common sense when dishing out sick leave. If someone gets sick say 20 times a year, have a talk with them. 1-4 times a year is acceptable, maybe more if they have kids.

Also, lets look at workers with kids. Let's face it, Kids are germ magnets. If kids are forced to go to school sick because their is no one at home to take care of them, then other kids and other parents are going to get sick to. If you are going to look at the problem from a CDC POV, the first place you should screwtinized is the schools.

johnbest's picture
johnbest 1 year 33 weeks ago
#10

My mother had the Kaiser health plan. In 1987 she went in for heart surgery and everything went fine until her bowel ruptured and they had to do a colestomy. As a result of the cholestomy she was put in intensive care for a Candida infection. She lingered in intensive care for about 6 weeks. When she was released she went in to a convalescent hospital. Medicare would only pay two months of care. She was finally released. I think that she was very embaressed by the colostomy bag and started withering away. When she died she was skin and bones and died suddenly after being rushed to Kaiser Hospital. I will say one good thing about the doctor. He called me on the phone and told me that my mother had passed away. I lived about 75 miles away and didn't know she was in the hospital.

We need single payer health care. Being that this will be difficult to get through the misers in Congress, I think we should - as a minimum - implement Medicare for all. It would be a good start.

Kend's picture
Kend 1 year 33 weeks ago
#11

Dannemarc there is bad doctors everywhere and I hate to break the bad news to you but Government health care isn't any better. I have some great stories and some bad ones as well. Just think your congress running your health care system. They can't pass a budget. That's what we have running our health care system in Canada. government doesn't do anything well do they? Government or insurance companies, we are all hooped

2950-10K's picture
2950-10K 1 year 33 weeks ago
#12

In ancient Greece, anyone who thought their own personal needs trumped those of society as a whole was marked and labeled an idiot.

For modern America I think Thom's statement, "This is insanity," applys well. It's insanity that we continue to allow a few rich idiots to squeeze every last bit they can from us.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#13

With all due respect Kend, if you haven't been here and used the system you can't really judge. For someone who pays through his taxes as opposed to someone who pays through their pocket, you'd think you'd get more bang for your buck and not less. I'll take you're Canadian system over our private system any day!

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#14

Agreed, but I think "Insanity" is more adequate of a description. Greed is a mental illness. Labeling greedy rich people as idiots is an insult to idiots.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#15

BTW I'd also take the system in Mexico over our system any day. My brother-in-law was a victim of their unregulated fireworks on a visit. He was seen and treated minutes after his injury with no complications by a free neighborhood clinic. He was back on his feet the next day. In addition, I've met several Seniors from the USA who have formed communities in Mexico partially as a result of their Medical system. Even Mexico blows us away in Medical care. How does that make you feel Kend!

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#16

Wow Johnbest, the story of your mother and Kaiser is almost identical to the story of my best friend and Kaiser. It brings back such painful memories--rushed surgery, catastrophic gastrointestinal side affects, super infection, long term painful recovery. Unbelievable!

I can add that a Doctor running the emergency room put my friend on liquid restrictions when he was bleeding to death. Fortunately for him a friend who was a off duty paramedic and was in the emergency room with him at the time insisted that he would die if not re hydrated immediately. The emergency room nurses and his sister agreed and pressured the head surgeon to give him a saline drip to save his life. Only after being threatened did the head surgeon agree.
We all believe that Kaiser intentionally tried to kill my friend to save them the cost of correcting his condition. If nothing else the experience demonstrates gross negligence of the Kaiser establishment who protect their incompetence through forcing their members to agree to binding arbitration rather than suing for malpractice in just such occasions.
Once again I reiterate, I will take the medical care of Canada or Mexico before I step into any Private American Health Care Hospital.

ken ware's picture
ken ware 1 year 33 weeks ago
#17

Not to sound like I am just taking the opposite point here, but my daughter has had Kaiser for 10 years and has never had a problem with the care she has received there. She is pregnant and has access to her Dr. faster than I do with my PPI plan. They have upgraded their computer system where a patient can log on and get their test results or E-mail their Dr. and get a reply in a reasonable time period. They are one of the few HMO's that I would recommend to others. In fact their service had been so good I am thinking about switching from my plan to theirs. I guess everyone has had different experiences with their medical provider.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#18

God Bless your Daughter. I hope and pray her experience with her Kaiser and the Kaiser of everyone else is better than mine. Good to hear from you Ken. I wish I could find a photo of myself that I could share. Heres a little something I did a while ago you might get a kick out of. I sure did get a kick out of doing it. This one's for you Ken:

http://timemeoutbloggosphere.blogspot.com/

May God Bless your family!

ken ware's picture
ken ware 1 year 33 weeks ago
#19

DAnneMarc - Cat in a box, hilarious!

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#20

TY

Kend's picture
Kend 1 year 33 weeks ago
#21

No I understand your system very well if you have money you get the best care in the world if you don't you don't. I think the biggest misconception is that government health care is the be all and end all but the truth is in Canada the wealthy here don't wait like the poor. They go to a private hospitals and get great care. I have lots of friends who worked down there and yes they pay more personally for health care but there taxes are a lot less. So it works out at the end. Also keep in mind Canada has a tenth of the population as the US about 33 million but it has 10 times the resources that are owned by the government and we still struggle to keep up with the rising costs of health care.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#22

Actually Ken, I have had good experiences with Kaiser. Simply, not the Kaiser of Oakland or Hayward. I know of no one who has anything good to say about these hospitals and both these establishments have horrible reputations. My good experience was with the Kaiser of Fremont. Much further away from my house but worth the drive. They fixed my hernia and my carpul tunnel in my right hand. I don't have any complaint about that hospital; and, both have and continue to recommend it. I hope your daughter is fortunite enough to have such a resource at hand. If so, than I agree she's in good hands.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#23

Kend, It's not just quality of care and cost. With Single Payer we can drastically reduce not only cost but waiting time to see Doctors. The biggest factor in health care is preventive medicine. By being able to see Doctors quickly without cost many expensive, costly and dangerous health problems can be treated early and expensive consequences reduced or prevented.

In addition, by removing the cost of care from patients and their employers we drastically help solve our current fiscal and unemployment problems; as well as, eliminate all the unnecessary health problems created by it. Malnutrition, emergency room violence, lack of early diagnoses of illnesses, mental illness, aberrant alcoholism, and manic depression, are all results of wide spread unemployment. By switching the burden of health care costs to the taxpayer, employers will no longer be hobbled by this bureaucracy and can hire more people and pay them more; and, we as a nation, can better complete with the labor forces of other nations with public health care; and, as a result, we can start to actually pay off our national debt.

In essence, the current monopoly over health care in the US by private health insurance companies is directly responsible for our unemployment and fiscal emergencies. In addition, this monopoly is responsible for causing more health problems and higher healthcare costs.

Until we heal the root causes of our nation's problems we can never expect a full recovery from them.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#24

An example of how important preventive medicine is would be the case of my brother-in-law's injury in Mexico. He received third degree burns on his chest. He was seen and treated for free within minutes. He was not even a citizen of Mexico. If he had to wait till he returned to the US for treatment he risked an infection that could have taken months to treat; in addition to other potential consequences of infections.

Thanks to the generosity of the good tax payers of Mexico my brother-in-law and our private insurance industry here was spared having to pay for expensive and very painful treatments to cure unnecessary consequences of his injury. Most important of all, he was able to fully enjoy the rest of his vacation and returned healthy.

Single Payer is the answer to a plethora of problems.

Kend's picture
Kend 1 year 33 weeks ago
#25

Sorry Danne I have to respectfully disagree with you. In theory that all sounds great but in reality our single payer isn't perfect. first off all people have to look after themselves with or single payer. Knowing all your medical needs are taken care doesn't help them do that It just makes it worst. The bottom line is if you have a good private plan now when you go to single payer your health will probably get worst and if you don't it will get better. There is some problems with our system because there is no fee to see a doctor some people abuse it. My Doctor has the same elderly lady see him every Wednesday even though there is nothing wrong with her. My son waited 10 months to see stomach specialist. But at least we all see one. I guess I am just hoping you don't get your hopes up too much health care is expensive no matter how you do it.

Palindromedary 1 year 33 weeks ago
#26

All they have to do is to make many of the commonly needed drugs, that currently now require a prescription, over-the-counter without needing a prescription. They have quite a racket going on for them now..requiring you be forever stuck with having to go to the doctor (which clogs up the system creating a more costly system) ...just to get a prescription.

Many people have chronic diseases, like asthma and high blood pressure, and they have been taking these prescription medications for years and years and they know that they will have to take them until they die.

So why the heck do you have to constantly go back to the doctor...just to get a prescription refilled? Yes, they can refill them over the phone...but why is that even necessary? And, sure they get you into the lab for tests...mostly to protect their asses. It's just a racket that is meant to keep the prices high and to squeeze out every last cent out of us.

One medication that I was quite surprised that they finally made over-the-counter was Omeprazole which keeps the stomach from over-producing acids..for people who are bothered with indigestion. Why can't they do that for Asthma medications...especially the inhalers? Why can't they do that for high blood pressure?

Many people have high blood pressure which could eventually kill them if they can't get medicines to reduce their blood pressure. And right now...you can't get these medicines without a prescription...and unless you have insurance...it is questionable whether the doctors you pay cash to will actually write a prescription for reducing blood pressure.

I know someone who, doesn't have insurance, and spent close to $1000.00 on doctors trying to get a prescription for high blood pressure. She goes in because she is sick and her blood pressure test showed high(something like 190/130)but the doctor would only send her to the lab for expensive tests and scan for the original illness she went in for; but, they wouldn't write a prescription for high blood pressure. They wanted her to go back the next week to see another doctor. She did and they said her blood pressure measurements wasn't all that high (this time about 160/100). She told the doctor that she had been using a blood pressure monitor at her home for over a year and saw that her blood pressure was steadily getting higher. The doctor wouldn't write a prescription and wanted her to come back in again in two more weeks. She realized that the doctors were just jerking her around and milking her for cash...and cancelled the appointment.

Palindromedary 1 year 33 weeks ago
#27

And how many people actually get flu shots every year? And how many people will avoid getting flu shots not just from the scarey prospects that they might kill you but also from the fact that you have no health insurance? If you have health insurance you go to the doctor, if you don't, you don't go to the doctor and will likely not get flu shots. An epidemic waiting to happen! And after what just happened in that case of contaminated injections for back pain* not many people are going to have much trust in those flu shots.

*13,000 people with 8 dying after getting injections of contaminated steroids for back pain. The injections came from the Massachusetts-based pharmacy, New England Compounding Center (NECC).

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#28

Palindromedary I think you've touched on an interesting point.

The current system does do us a disservice requiring Doctors Prescriptions for everything. On one of my vacations in Mexico I started to come down with a cold. I wasn't very happy about my condition ruining my vacation. My wife suggested we go get some penicillin pills and I'd be fine in a day or two. I asked who I could get them from. She said the corner store a half block down the street. I was in disbelief. When we got to the store the 11 year old girl behind the counter asked us what we wanted. We told her penicillin for a cold. She pulled out a string of packaged pills from a box, told us to take one every day for three days, tore off three pills on a packaged strip, handed it to us and said that will be 30 pesos--about $3.00. I almost fainted. An eleven year old child handing out antibiotics over the counter without a license and not demanding a prescription and an insurance card?

After I took the first pill, about 6 hours later, I started to feel better. Halfway though the next day after taking the second pill in the morning I felt well again. All the symptoms were gone! I don't think I needed the third pill but I followed the directions of the little girl because she seemed to know what she was talking about. You're absolutely right Palindromedary, our Pharmaceutical dispensing system is a rip off, an obstacle to our general health, and in insult to our intelligence. Like I said before, like it or not, Mexico is far more progressive in Heath Care than the US.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#29

BTW Ken, I told my cat Xena about your comment. She said, "Thank you, it was a pleasure to perform for you."

Palindromedary 1 year 33 weeks ago
#30

DAnneMarc: Yes, I have also been down to Mexico...Guadalajara...many times for work for weeks at a time. I am very much aware of how easy it is to get prescription meds in those pharmacies. They try to scare us, here in America, with propaganda about how those drugs could very easily be tainted or not even the real thing. But, the Mexicans do just fine with them...and besides, most of the drugs that they pedal here in America comes from abroad anyway. Some of those drugs that they pedal to us here in America under brand names could very well be just a tainted or fake as any others. I think I remember reading something on that...which was quite shocking at the time I read it. DEA, USDA...you name it government organizations that are supposed to watch out for our safety can no longer be trusted either. They are just as bought off as anyone else.

By the way, there is a big lake just south of Guadalajara that has a number of communities that are heavily populated by lots of non-Mexicans...many Americans and other people from other countries. They usually have gated communities and they look just like any other nice gated communities in the US. I looked at the properties for sale and, about 4 or 5 years ago, they were all very inexpensive compared to the US. The area right around Guadalajara often gets very smoggy...choke...choke...but I've never seen or smelled that problem further south near that lake. Lake Chapala I believe the name was. There were gated communities, at that time just north of the lake.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#31

Small World Palindromedary. Guadalajara is where we land when we visit San Gabriel which is about an hour or so from Sayula and several hours from Guadalajara. It's a wonderful Pueblocito. We actually already own a house there, and if it wasn't for our property here that is under water we would probably move there to retire. I'm also keeping my eye out for something in Manzanilla. That's my ideal retirement goal. Something near the beach where we could sail a boat and fish. Heaven!

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#32

Wow Palindromedary, I just Googled Lake Chapala. Now you got me curious. I just told my wife we are going to have to check out this place on our next visit. Thanks Buddy!

Palindromedary 1 year 33 weeks ago
#33

DAnneMarc: Cool! You've already got a house down there..that's great! I checked out those two pueblocitos you mentioned...not far from Lake Chapala. They are over closer to that Volcano which erupted in 2005 a couple of times. And that oceanside city Manzanillo looks very interesting...but quite a drive from Guadajara.

I went to the town of Chapala, a number of times which is on the Northern edge of Lake Chapala. I've eaten in various dining spots around the pier area..and there is a large plaza where they have art festivals..bought a few T-shirts. I also drove around to the west to Ajijic and further west but I didn't go all the way around the lake. In Ajijic they have some very nice housing and many Americans live in that area as well as other areas around the lake. The lake does, however, tend to get low sometimes. I was there when it was at fairly normal levels and then again when it was lower.

When I first started to go to Guadalajara I stayed at the Hotel Presidente and enjoyed going to the Plaza Del Sol just across the street. I liked the fountains. One had bronze statues that looked like thrones but the back rests were very tall with heads on top....like you could sit in the laps of these throne creatures....reminds me of a del Toro movie...Pan's Labyrinth for example (one of my favorite movies). But I got tired of staying in the same place and having to fight the traffic and smog (a sometimes occurrence) so I started staying at the El Tapatio Resort Hotel. It was much closer to where I had to work and it was up high on a hill giving me a great view of the city. It is an older hotel with a lot of history and many people have weddings and banquets there a lot. But it is very peaceful. The entrance is gated with guards and there is a winding cobblestone drive up the hill. Tlaquepaque historic shopping and restaurant district is nearby to the north.

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/1112891?source=wapi&referrer=kh.google.com

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#34

Yeah. It belongs to my wife's family. It's huge, 5br/2ba with a yard big enough for three more houses. It's in a great location near schools, the main clinic, and stores. It's in walking distance to anywhere in the pueblo. (So's every other house there. LOL) There's also a huge ranch with a natural water supply just outside the pueblocito. The problem is all her siblings want to live here because the income and crime rates are more tolerable. All their kids were raised here and all their friends are here. You mentioned del Toro. I'm sure you're aware his father was kidnapped and after spending a fortune to get him back he had to flee the country. He's famous for saying that he's "in involuntary exile [from his country]."

I too love the architecture in Mexico. It's rich, artistic, delicate, and splendid. I love the brick buildings natural weatherproofing, central open sky lighting, and general overall feel of quality craftsmanship and materials. (I have mixed feelings about sleeping under a brick ceiling.) I love the extensive use of textiles and flamboyant display of color. I equally love the humble and hospitable nature of the people. However, despite being somewhat fluent in the language I do often sense being treated differently when I'm alone than when I'm with a family member. However, you are right, an American could retire their and live like a King.

Despite the minor issues of crime, kidnapping, drug violence and domestic property obligations, I would love to relocate after I retire if those issues could be resolved. Times will change for sure by then. Of course I feel the key to resolving the problems over there begins with resolving the problems over here. Gated communities also lack appeal. Prisons are gated communities. Also, I don't particularly like the idea of running away from my problems. Problems love to follow the path of least resistance just like any other natural force. I'm sure that since you haven't already made that move you probably feel the same way too.

My father never let me run away from a fight. He used to say, "You can fight that other kid or you can fight me. What's it gonna be." You'd have felt sorry for the other kid. I can assure you he didn't follow me home.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#35

BTW Everyone I know who's in the know have recommended consideration of either Panama or Costa Rica. They say they have great climates, low crime rates and cheap living. Have you looked into those countries or are you dead set on Mexico?

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#36

Wow, I just Googled Ajijic. Now you got me curious again. I wonder if its as nice as the pictures. Thanks for that tidbit. I'm gonna have to check it out next chance I get.

Palindromedary 1 year 33 weeks ago
#37

DAnneMarc: I don't remember any "gated" communities in Ajajic...they just looked like fairly nice and large houses on large yards. I did see some a couple of miles north of Chapala to the west of the main route going to Chapala.

I had entertained the idea of moving to that area but I was never really seriously considering it. And I have heard about Americans moving to Costa Rica and Panama. But, I've never looked into that. So far, I'm doing ok right here in Semipalatinsk, Khazakstan...all of those old nuclear waste dumps and old nuke bomb test sites just seems like home. Besides, I would have trouble getting all three wives to move away from their families. ;-}

Palindromedary 1 year 33 weeks ago
#38

DAnneMarc: I had not heard that about del Toro. That's too bad. To bad his father didn't have an RFID chip injected in his arm so that they could track him. Some business people going down to Mexico have used these in case they were kidnapped. And even Mexican authorities have ordered these for the same reason.

Here's an old article I found...no telling what they have now. I get the feeling that, because of the bad publicity they have gotten...Mark of the Beast lore... they try to keep the newsworthy stuff aimed at animal control.

"Latin American customers are looking at both technologies for security purposes, which partly explains why some of VeriChip's early clients included Mexico's attorney general, as well as a Mexican agency trying to curb the country's kidnapping epidemic, and commercial distributors in Venezuela and Colombia. "

http://news.cnet.com/Human-chips-more-than-skin-deep/2009-1008_3-5318076...

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 33 weeks ago
#39

Interesting concept Palindromedary!

A RFID chip implant to thwart Kidnappers! In theory it's a great idea. However, I wouldn't trust my life in a technology that isn't yet been satisfactorily proven to me. Besides, you still incure the risk that the kidnappers could have a RFID detector in their midst and are more than prepared and willing to conduct a sedation-less arm amputation. It could be a win win situation for them--elimination of a tracking device and acquisition of positive identification of your identity to send to your ransom payers.

Just inject my chip into my ass. As I am told it is completely worthless! In addition, that's where I store my own personal weapon of mass destruction. If detected I should be able to launch a chemical counter attack that should allow me to escape unharmed.

OMG! We simply must get together sometime for margaritas in some villa south of the border. We'd have a gas. Pardon my pun! LOL Have a good evening, Buddy!

Palindromedary 1 year 33 weeks ago
#40

DAnneMarc: OMG LMAO!

PLSzymeczek's picture
PLSzymeczek 1 year 32 weeks ago
#41

Some of us can't take the flu shot, because we suffer a variety of adverse reactions. For instance, I get an off-the-charts migraine that can only be cured with an injection of Demerol followed by an injection of Imitrex.

PLSzymeczek's picture
PLSzymeczek 1 year 32 weeks ago
#42

My husband works for a construction subcontractor. Not only do they not have paid sick leave, but they do not pay for any holidays - not even Thanksgiving or Christmas.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 1 year 32 weeks ago
#43

I fully agree. I haven't had a flu shot in 3 years because of an adverse reaction I had many years ago. I got nauseous and ended up dehydrated on my back for three days. It felt like I was going to die. I've come down with colds since then but nothing compared to my reaction to the flu shot. I won't let any Doctor now come near me with a hypo.

tranduyen's picture
tranduyen 50 weeks 1 day ago
#44

As a 2009 study in the American Journal of Public Health found, there were as many as 5 million additional cases of the H1N1 flu in 2009, due to a lack of paid sick time. dental business review

From Screwed:
"If we are going to live in a Democracy, we need to have a healthy middle class. Thom Hartmann shows us how the ‘cons’ have wronged this country, and tells us what needs to be done to reclaim what it is to be American."
Eric Utne, Founder, Utne magazine
From Cracking the Code:
"No one communicates more thoughtfully or effectively on the radio airwaves than Thom Hartmann. He gets inside the arguments and helps people to think them through—to understand how to respond when they’re talking about public issues with coworkers, neighbors, and friends. This book explores some of the key perspectives behind his approach, teaching us not just how to find the facts, but to talk about what they mean in a way that people will hear."
to understand how to respond when they’re talking about public issues with coworkers, neighbors, and friends. This book explores some of the key perspectives behind his approach, teaching us not just how to find the facts, but to talk about what they mean in a way that people will hear."
From The Thom Hartmann Reader:
"With the ever-growing influence of corporate CEOs and their right-wing allies in all aspects of American life, Hartmann’s work is more relevant than ever. Throughout his career, Hartmann has spoken compellingly about the value of people-centered democracy and the challenges that millions of ordinary Americans face today as a result of a dogma dedicated to putting profit above all else. This collection is a rousing call for Americans to work together and put people first again."
Richard Trumka, President, AFL-CIO