Why isn't CNN's Anderson Cooper an enemy of the state?

Yesterday - Julian Assange addressed the United Nations - and discussed the United States' continuing investigation of Wikileaks and Bradley Manning. But what's the real lesson on journalism in the 21st century that needs to be taken away from the Assange case. Since June - Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has been holed up in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London trying to avoid extradition to Sweden - and eventually the United States where he could meet the same fate as Bradley Manning or worse. His crime? Being a journalist. There's one industry specifically mentioned in the Constitution - just one. And it's the press - it's journalism. It's the tool "we the people" have to keep our government in check - and to make sure "we the people" have all the information we need to be informed members of our democracy. The press is absolutely essential - which is why it's named and protected in the very first amendment in our Bill of Rights. And journalism has taken many different forms over the centuries - adapting to technological changes in our society. From the quill pen to the printing press to radio to television to now the Internet - journalism has utilized all of these methods to do its job and speak truth to power. But it's that last method - the Internet - that really frightens power. And it's that last method - the Internet - in which Wikileaks exclusively operates. The reach and speed by which information can be distributed now - thanks to the Internet - is unprecedented ...