Corporaterrorists on the Prowl.....in Congress

lieberman 2 imagesSenate Democrats on Monday evening dropped the plan to include the Medicare to 55 expansion, winning the support of Joe Lieberman and the acquiescence of liberals, in another major step toward building enough support to pass a health-care corporaterrorist giveaway. Lieberman repeatedly touted expanding Medicare during his run for president in 2004 and as recently as 3 months ago. Why is Joe opposing it now? It's becoming increasingly obvious that Joe's wife's lobbying for the health insurance gangsters, combined with his sociopathic hatred of the progressives who challenged and beat him in the Connecticut primary, has led him to make sure that there's no real health reform that will touch his wife's employer's employers, the banksters who run the insurance companies.  We used to say that we have the best congress money can buy.  Now it's safe to say that we have the worst Senate that money can buy.  And the worst of that worst is Joe Lieberman - although let's not forget that his position is backed by every single Republican in the Senate, that party having already sold its soul to the banksters decades ago.

In Strange News...The Senate Democratic Policy Committee (DPC) “will hold an important hearing on jobs creation” on Wednesday. Who are they turning to for job ideas?  Larry Lindsey and John McCain's chief economic policy advisor during his 2008 presidential campaign, Douglas Holtz-Eakin. This is the Holtz-Eakin who told a recent GOP event that the single best jobs policy would be end government regulation of business and cut the size of government protective agencies. The Democrats are now asking the craziest of the Republicans for jobs advice?  Don't they remember FDR? Or can't they simply look at Germany, which was hit even harder by the recession than we were but never went below 5.6 percent unemployment because of government programs?  Apparently not..

Comments

brian a. hayes (not verified) 12 years 35 weeks ago
#1

campaign finance reform is needed to change things.lets demand that this happens next.lets seek out what thoms hartmann and jim hightower ideas are to see this happen. jim talks about how loop holes are made for the corporations and politicians can get around reform. lets seek out thom and jim's guidance on this and make true reform happen. thom and jim i ask you to help us see that true campaign finance reform happens.

Democurmudgeon (not verified) 12 years 35 weeks ago
#2

Picking up where Thom leaves off, Dylan Ratigan on MSNBC grills a Democrat over the many loopholes in finance reform. It's so much fun to watch Dyaln and his take no prisoners video clip.

http://democurmudgeon.blogspot.com/2009/12/dylan-ratigan-guy-who-coined-...

Cindy Gordon (not verified) 12 years 35 weeks ago
#3

Having been in Tech before it was called that-since 1982-and hearing all the talk and seeing the results of that talk the past 3 decades, my point of view is from the experience of having been an employee, a contractor, and a business owner. Seen the inside of lots of name brand corporations and the greed and waste therein is ridiculous. That is where the solution is for things-facing that reality and requiring leadership that doesn’t act like those things are normal, ok or not even there. This leads into off shore –out sourcing whatever you want to call it. In the long term has never saved money for us –you and me the consumer- nationally. It has increased the profits of the corporations that do it. Prices have never gone down for the customer with any outsourcing, and continue to rise in spite of it. We must take responsibility nationally for our own money needs, and bring leadership and profit in line with that. There is more than enough money to take care of everything, it is about how much profit is reasonable (and unreasonable) that drives costs up. The mentality that Upper Management personnel should make millions of dollars a year is gross negligence pure and simple in broad daylight. Everyone is told that ‘mentality’ and how we see things makes the difference about getting things done. Start there-get Management that believes in healthcare 1st – you know do the job – and can also be the kind of human that 500k a year tops is enough to live on. I believe in free enterprise and innovation and rewards but anyone who needs more than that annually is not a ‘team’ player IMO. I have made that kind of money a year (100-500k) sometimes w/o being in management, and have done just fine even with a large family thank you and have no professional respect for anyone that personally makes millions and then is in charge of raising prices and cutting employees.

I also have even less respect for those who aren't making that kind of money and accept or justify those that do. It shows what they wish to be someday. None of this approach to 'success' is long term productive for anyone but a small few who run things into the ground and then demand to be able to continue to collect money when it costs everyone else but them. As a sales person I have to deal with this mentality climbing up the corporate ladder, or the person already there-a CEO/CFO/CIO often - and it makes it near impossible to negotiate anything based reality or saving money in spite of a great amount of talk and buzz word jargon that seems to convey that such things are what are the goal. I do have Accounts that I have prospected and obtained that are not peopled by these aforementioned types. Some of them you have heard about in the news as Healthcare innovators for cutting cost and raising services all with domestic employees They are the model of the future.

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