Tuesday Daily Topics Dec 8th 2009

polar bear 2 imagesQuote:  "It is a cruel thought, that, when we feel ourselves standing on the firmest ground in ever respect, the cursed arts of our secret enemies...should effect, by depreciating our money, what the open arms of a powerful enemy could not."  -- Thomas Jefferson to Richard Henry Lee

Hour One - How the wealthy staged a coup d'etat?

Hour Two - Are our legislators actually now working on Medicare Part E - everybody? with Carrie Lucas www.iwf.org

Hour Three - Is climate change just a big "left wing conspiracy" or will it end all life as we know it? with Marc Morano www.climatedepot.com

Guest: Rep. Peter DeFazio www.defazio.house.gov About his new legislation and Glass-Steagall

Comments

Mark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#1

Many years ago I was sitting in a college classroom, where a quest lecturer was providing the assembled students with the contents of her editorial experience. During this lecture, I was busy with pen and paper, scribbling without cease. The guest lecturer was much impressed with my fascination with her great learning, and effort not to lose one morsel of it. She crept a little closer to where I was sitting, perhaps so that I would not miss a single syllable.

But something was amiss; why was the student sitting next me gazing at my handiwork with at first a quizzical look, then recognition, followed by silent laughter? Because, it seems, that I wasn’t exactly engaged in studious note-taking, but something I often did when I was bored in class: rotisserie baseball doodling. Ever since I could read a box score, I was fascinated with the numbers and statistics involved. I was no good at geometry or algebra, but I sure was a wiz at figurin’ batting averages, slugging percentages and ERAs in my head.

At my current place of employment, it is also important to be know basic math, mainly adding and multiplying. It seems however, that the people who are supposed to be most proficient at it only pretend to be, or someone thinks they are supposed to be. You have these “smart” people (i.e. pallid-complexioned) propped in front of computer screens and attempting to tabulate how much weight goes where on an a/c, which is not that difficult, but the people who do that make it seem so, either out of pretense, or their amateurs. I tend to think the latter, because the gate sheets I need to make deliveries are only fit for the trash can an hour after they’ve been printed out. “Musical Gates” is a game that is only “fun” for those “superior” people sitting in front of their computer terminals, apparently because correcting math errors only means moving this number to here, and that number to there, without having to bother what effect their constant mistakes have on the people outside who have to transform those mistakes into corrective action. I figure I could do just as well or better, but then again, that would mean they are not better, as they wish to think.

In keeping in this vein, it would seem that a working knowledge of simple addition and subtraction would be a prerequisite for being a banker. If you were a banker who gave away all the bank’s money for nothing and no questions asked, with no stipulation that it ever be paid back, should you be allowed to continue in that fashion—let alone even keeping your job? Well, apparently that is what Ben Bernanke and the Republicans think. Bernanke and the FED have given away trillions of dollars with no clue where it went or why. Most of it is fake money, of course, but what’s a few trillion in phony money between friends? With the CBO reporting that most of the TARP money will be paid back, the current adminsitration seems to be a better banker than the real ones. And yet Bernanke and the Republicans would have you and me cover for their own wretched bungling, having the absolute gall to advocate covering this private debt by doing away with public services like Social Security and Medicare—and replacing them with what? TIME magazine had a cover story recently that advocated “retiring” the 401k, because of its volatility; pension plans are increasingly becoming extinct, and we all know about the monstrosity that is private health insurance. The rich, of course, have not the slightest idea of the suffering of those at the other end of the wealth spectrum, so we can expect such insensitivity.

It is interesting to note that the U.S. has the lowest tax rate in the civilized world, which Republican math calculates is the reason why the country’s economy is in such “great shape” despite double-digit unemployment. It’s always nice have friends who are also rich to remind you of that.

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#2

From Gerald Socha:

Gerald Socha December 8th, 2009, 2:46 am

I may not be able to post some pertinent articles but you can read many pertinent articles at antiwar.com.

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#3

From Loretta:

Loretta December 8th, 2009, 2:57 am

This terrific 2004 article by Thom on American-style fascism is being passed around Facebook right now.

http://boards.history.com/thread.jspa?threadID=300021037&tstart=0&mod=10...

“Although most Americans remember that Harry Truman was Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Vice President when Roosevelt died in 1945 (making Truman President), Roosevelt had two previous Vice Presidents – John N. Garner (1933-1941) and Henry A. Wallace (1941-1945). In early 1944, the New York Times asked Vice President Henry Wallace to, as Wallace noted, ‘write a piece answering the following questions: What is a fascist? How many fascists have we? How dangerous are they?’

Vice President Wallace’s answer to those questions was published in The New York Times on April 9, 1944, at the height of the war against the Axis powers of Germany and Japan.

‘The really dangerous American fascists,” Wallace wrote, “are not those who are hooked up directly or indirectly with the Axis. The FBI has its finger on those. The dangerous American fascist is the man who wants to do in the United States in an American way what Hitler did in Germany in a Prussian way. The American fascist would prefer not to use violence. His method is to poison the channels of public information. With a fascist the problem is never how best to present the truth to the public but how best to use the news to deceive the public into giving the fascist and his group more money or more power.’

In this, Wallace was using the classic definition of the word “fascist” – the definition Mussolini had in mind when he claimed to have invented the word. (It was actually Italian philosopher Giovanni Gentile who wrote the entry in the Encyclopedia Italiana that said: “Fascism should more appropriately be called corporatism because it is a merger of state and corporate power.” Mussolini, however, affixed his name to the entry, and claimed credit for it.)

As the 1983 American Heritage Dictionary noted, fascism is: “A system of government that exercises a dictatorship of the extreme right, typically through the merging of state and business leadership, together with belligerent nationalism.”

Mussolini was quite straightforward about all this. In a 1923 pamphlet titled “The Doctrine of Fascism” he wrote, “If classical liberalism spells individualism, Fascism spells government.” But not a government of, by, and for We The People – instead, it would be a government of, by, and for the most powerful corporate interests in the nation. “

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#4

From Gerald Socha:

Gerald Socha December 8th, 2009, 2:57 am

There is Obama-mania in Europe. My consult to Obama is that he should run to be the president of the European Union.

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#5

From Loretta:

Loretta December 8th, 2009, 3:49 am

Sorry I offered the wrong link to Thom’s article. The one I gave you was a re-post.

http://www.commondreams.org/views04/0719-15.htm

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#6

From Zero G.:

Zero G. December 8th, 2009, 7:42 am

Lorreta, remember this?

THREATS AND RESPONSES: NEWS ANALYSIS; A New Power In the Streets
By PATRICK E. TYLER
Published: Monday, February 17, 2003
The fracturing of the Western alliance over Iraq and the huge antiwar demonstrations around the world this weekend are reminders that there may still be two superpowers on the planet: the United States and world public opinion.

In his campaign to disarm Iraq, by war if necessary, President Bush appears to be eyeball to eyeball with a tenacious new adversary: millions of people who flooded the streets of New York and dozens of other world cities to say they are against war based on the evidence at hand.

from: http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/17/world/threats-and-responses-news-analy...

One of my largest frustrations, and my first anti-war street demonstration was in ‘67 with my folks, is that the Bush administration managed to completely overwhelm demonstrated public anger.

And I didn’t see Barack Obama as the leader of the anti-war movement. (He did give an anti-Iraq invasion speech.)

What happened? We saw the Bush administration launch pre-emptive arrests of protest groups and leaders, free-speech zones, TV media freeze-outs, etc. Would any news analyst today argue that public opinion represents a balance to corporate/military power?

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#7

Quark December 8th, 2009, 8:01 am

Zero G.,

You echo my sentiments. Millions of people out in the streets around the world didn’t make any difference. I don’t think protests are useful to anyone except FOX Noise. Logistically, what else can be done, though, I wonder? Thom talks about “movement politics.” How, exactly, would this work (or would it?)

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#8

Quark December 8th, 2009, 8:20 am

What do all movements have in common? Is it that there has been someone to get out in front of the parade? Do we need a “leader?” If so, where IS that person?

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#9

From Zero G.:

Zero G. December 8th, 2009, 8:41 am

Abbie Hoffman once observed that “we are all quarterbacks,” and we tend to Disney-fy leaders and history, anyway. Consider MLK, the media would have you believe that he had a dream, won civil rights and then turned over and went back to sleep, not gone on to denounce Viet Nam and economic issues.

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#10

From Zero G.:

Zero G. December 8th, 2009, 8:51 am

Thinking back to the day I saw John & Yoko Lennon w/Elephant’s Memory play to the crowd @ Bryant Park NYC during an anti-war rally.

All we are saying…

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#11

Quark December 8th, 2009, 8:56 am

Zero G.,

You bring tears to my eyes…

But are you saying that we don’t have leaders, we need leaders, or we can force change without a leader?

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#12

Quark December 8th, 2009, 8:59 am

Zero G.,

Personally, I don’t see any person(s) galvanizing the populace the way the people you mentioned did.

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#13

Quark December 8th, 2009, 9:01 am

Zero G.,

I think the sentiment for reform is THERE, on both the left and the right. Who will head the parade?

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#14

From Zero G.:

Zero G. December 8th, 2009, 9:10 am

Quark,

I’m not sure. I am observing that we tend to rely on a leader to absolve ourselves our own responsibilities, we also prop them onto pedestals and then berate them for human frailties.

On a completely different subject, Is particle spin observed in three spatial dimensions a reflection of momentum of saId particle in a fourth?

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#15

Quark December 8th, 2009, 9:14 am

Zero G.,

I was observing that there always seems to have been a “focal point”, if you will, a so-called leader, who gets the “movement” headed in the same direction. I do wish humans were more like the deer in Thom’s story about democracy in the animal kingdom. If enough of us decide which direction to go, we all head off at once, regardless of what the alpha male is doing…

Re: “On a completely different subject, Is particle spin observed in three spatial dimensions a reflection of momentum of saId particle in a fourth?”

I think there is no way to tell. What do YOU think?

DRichards (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#16

Carbon Capitalists Warming to Climate Market Using Derivatives
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601086&sid=aXRBOxU5KT5M

Will the carbon derivatives boom destabilize the economy and lead to another crash?

Zero G. (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#17

Quark,

It is well beyond my math skills, however, from my limited understanding of the equations, there are equivilant solutions which seem to suggest that.

I bring it up because the LHC has been powered up and is now the powerful collider in operation. I read Warped Passages by Dr. Lisa Randall who seems to believe we may find out with this tool.

Thom once mentioned it as a pigeon alert, when it had a problem at start-up. Dr. Randall isn’t worried about a black hole being formed swallowing all known creation.

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#18

Zero G.,

I'm not worried, either. I think we are already experiencing a black hole.

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#19

Zero G.,

I have been following the LHC progress, too, and waiting for results with baited breath. (Really.)

Zero G. (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#20

I do wish humans were more like the deer in Thom’s story about democracy in the animal kingdom. If enough of us decide which direction to go, we all head off at once, regardless of what the alpha male is doing… - Quark

Well, if we're wishing, I wish we were more like bonobos...

Zero G. (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#21

Quark,

Are you refering to the gravity well at the center of the galaxy, or the black hole of the military/industrial/media complex into which all known resources are drawn? Or other?

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#22

Zero G.,

I love it when you sprinkle your comments with references to theoretical physics and cosmology! Warm and fuzzy...LOL (No really, it's one of my favorite subjects!)

Specifically, I was referring to "the black hole of the military/industrial/media complex into which all known resources are drawn." Not only that, but this black hole is so powerful that it is emitting "energy jets" that are lethal to anything nearby.

It does seem that mankind can't keep itself from hurtling headlong into oblivion.

Zero G. (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#23

Quark,

Then mankind is observing the 2nd law of thermodynamics, the rush to maximum entropy, rather than spontanious organization or intelligence.

Although, Terrence McKenna spoke about the trend towards increased novelty.

Mugsy (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#24

Thom

IT DOESN'T MATTER HOW MUCH PRIVATE INSURANCE COMPANIES COMPETE WITH EACH OTHER.

They make a profit ONE WAY and one way only: BY DENYING CARE. PERIOD.

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#25

Zero G.,

I look at states of being as either created or destroyed. Anything else is interesting.

(Ever since I read Hemingway for the first time, I have attempted to "simplify" to try to get to the heart of an issue. That does tend to leave things behind...)

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#26

Thom,

You should have Shawn Taylor do more speaking on your show. What a lovely voice!

DRichards (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#27

Surprise, surprise, surprise.

Adm Mike Mullen: US is losing war in Afghanistan
America's highest-ranking military officer admitted that US forces were currently losing the war in Afghanistan and said they had 18 to 24 months to turn around the Taliban's momentum.

By Alex Spillius in Washington
Published: 4:29PM GMT 08 Dec 2009
"This is the most dangerous time I've seen growing up the last four decades in uniform," Adm Mike Mullen told audiences of soldiers and marines, some of whom are weeks away from flying to conflict.
"We are not winning, which means we are losing and as we are losing, the message traffic out there to [insurgency] recruits keeps getting better and better and more keep coming."

US commander seeks to quell crisis in 'special relationship' with UK forces
Telling soldiers that he expected to be a tough fight and rising casualties in 2010, he said: "I don't want to be in any way unclear about that. This is what happened in Iraq during the surge and as tragic as it is, to turn this thing around, it will be a part of this surge, as well."
Adm Mullen said the July 2011 date to begin withdrawing US forces is not an end or withdrawal date.
"In the long run, it is not going to be about killing Taliban," he told the marines at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. "In the long run, it's going to be because the Afghan people want them out."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/afghanistan/6762317/Adm-M...

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#28

DRichards,

On one of Rachel Maddow's shows last week, the Taliban winning was made clear. The question is, what does that mean?

Zero G. (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#29

Quark - "You should have Shawn Taylor do more speaking on your show. What a lovely voice!"

Hear, Hear!

Hemingway seems reminiscent of Chris Hedges' feelings towards the pugilists he associated with in Boston.

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#30

Zero G.,

OK, maybe I'm suffering from amnesia. Please remind me or post a link to the Chris Hedges issue of which you speak... :)

Zero G. (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#31

There is more than one Taliban.

Think for a moment, is there one Democratic Party? Here in the good ole' US of A, with internet connections, cell phones, interstate highways.

TICA - This is Central Asia

A motto amonst NGOs in the region to remind one that you REALLY AREN'T in KANSAS anymore.

Think valleyism.

Zero G. (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#32

Quark,

From: Liberals are Useless, Chris Hedges:

I was also at the time a member of the Greater Boston YMCA boxing team. We fought on Saturday nights for $25 in arenas in working-class neighborhoods like Charlestown. My closest friends were construction workers and pot washers. They worked hard. They believed in unions. They wanted a better life, which few of them ever got. We used to run five miles after our nightly training, passing through the Mission Main and Mission Extension Housing Projects, and they would joke, “I hope we get mugged.” They knew precisely what to do with people who abused them. They may not have been liberal, they may not have finished high school, but they were far more grounded than most of those I studied with across the Charles River. They would have felt awkward, and would have been made to feel awkward, at the little gatherings of progressive and liberal intellectuals at Harvard, but you could trust and rely on them.

I went on to spend two decades as a war correspondent. The qualities inherent in good soldiers or Marines, like the qualities I found among those boxers, are qualities I admire—self-sacrifice, courage, the ability to make decisions under stress, the capacity to endure physical discomfort, and a fierce loyalty to those around you, even if it puts you in greater danger. If liberals had even a bit of their fortitude we could have avoided this mess. But they don’t. So here we are again, begging Obama to be Obama. He is Obama. Obama is not the problem. We are.
http://www.commondreams.org/view/2009/12/07

Richard L. Adlof (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#33

@Quark: A leader is the dude or dudette that stands up and walks in front and the people follow. We create our leaders.

brian a. hayes (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#34

what do you get when you mix religion with politics? you get the far right republican party and a country like iran.

Zero G. (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#35

Brian,

Or Israel, or Tibet.

Richard L. Adlof (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#36

@Quark:

To recognize a leader is to acknowledge a human as a force of nature.

A leader is ideas conceived and words delivered. WE focus our intent and a someone steps into the breach and becomes a figurehead.

WE can not stand around looking about for a head to hang a hat on. WE must, through pure force of being, will the universe into the form WE require it to be and know that there is someone to fill those shoes. I have no idea who will assume the role of the individual who struck the match.

WE are the leader, each of us, WE are waiting for. WE, all, need to stand up and be that which folk will follow.

Richard L. Adlof (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#37

@BrianAHayes: Or the Vatican City . . . or Tibet or Israel or . . .

I refuse to surrender to the concept that all religions are autocratic in nature. Yes, humans tend towards the default position of using their belief systems to beat the crap outta other folk BUT that is the reason for the Divine Commandment:

“You shall not carry the name of the deity before you for vain purposes.”

Humans grow and change and assert themselves as they grow and change. Humans will grow up. There is reason to believe that the deity seeks folk that will stand up and treat it as an equal. Yaakov stood up to Adonai and was called Yisrael and was blessed.

We can and must evolve or die.

Zero G. (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#38

Richard,

"Yaakov stood up to Adonai and was called Yisrael and was blessed."

Lot's wife wasn't so lucky. YHVH doesn't always seem reasonable. Hopefully we can incorporate the mythological corpus of humanity without allocating resources and living spaces based on such.

mstaggerlee (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#39

I regard the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as something of a testimony to American shortsightedness. Permit me to explain ...

I've held my current job for just about 17 years, now. The last company I worked for developed special equipment for high-energy physics research. Two projects that we were deeply involved in, starting about 5 or 6 years BEFORE I left that company were the LHC, and its American counterpart, the Super-Conducting Super-Collider (SCSC). Development began on BOTH of these projects at right about the same time. After about 2 years, the SCSC project essentially went away - funding dried up, or (more accurately) was re-directed. This project could have been the source of hundreds, if not thousands of jobs, and could have generated tremendous advances in technology right here in the US. But somehow, it just wasn't "sexy" enough for the USA of the latter 80's. So, the EU got the jobs and the glory, and we get to sit back and eat their dust.

Re: The "Leader" ... It could be you - or me, even. What it's gonna take is someone who's either simply willing to, or desperate enough to, risk EVERYTHING that they have and know, to take up the standard and make a leader of him/herself.

Hmmmm ... on second thought, maybe I'm NOT really a candidate ...

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#40

Zero G.,

Yes, Chris Hedges does sound like Hemingway (the "man's man.") Interesting comparison you made...

Richard,

Yes, the "leader" must jump in front of the already existing parade. If we create our leaders, who do you think they are?

Zero G. (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#41

mstaggerlee,

A guy who opened for the GD on 10/31/80 @ Radio City is now a US Senator.

Barry "the Fish" Melton ran for judge...

Maybe you are a candidate.

Mark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#42

I wonder if Thom means to say that we should disregard the tea baggers’ xenophobia and bigotry—or say that it is an area of “agreement?” Let’s not kid ourselves: These people would not be out there if a Republican was president—or a white Democrat. These people are out there because they answered the clarion call of racist fear, paranoia and scapegoating. Co-opting these tea bag “parties” also begs the question: If the left was not sufficiently motivated to protest the Bush administration’s domestic policies on social, economic, tax, health care and environmental issues, why should we expect them to do so now, even when they have an administration and Congress that may amenable to such pressure? I don’t disagree with Thom that progressives need to “get out there,” but not by “co-opting” tea bag parties. They to need to do their own “tea bagging” to show politicians that the progressive fringe can be just as influential as the right-wing fringe seems to be. Obama clearly needs to see that such influence is real.

We should not kid ourselves: Al Gore was not a “progressive,” but this country would be in a different place if Gore was in the White House instead of Bush. Hillary would not have been an alternative “answer” either, presuming she was electable; as we saw in her response to that Congolese student, she takes “affronts”—even when they are not intended and the fault of an interpreter— highly personally and without governance of her thoughts or tongue, a surefire way to make enemies in Congress in both parties.

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#43

Richard,

Re: "To recognize a leader is to acknowledge a human as a force of nature.

A leader is ideas conceived and words delivered. WE focus our intent and a someone steps into the breach and becomes a figurehead.

WE can not stand around looking about for a head to hang a hat on. WE must, through pure force of being, will the universe into the form WE require it to be and know that there is someone to fill those shoes. I have no idea who will assume the role of the individual who struck the match.

WE are the leader, each of us, WE are waiting for. WE, all, need to stand up and be that which folk will follow."

I feel like a kid asking the simple questions, but what does this mean, in real terms?

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#44

Thom,

Does Peter Defasio have anything he wants us to do to support him (other than contacting our own congressmen?)

Zero G. (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#45

Mark,

There was plenty of protest against Bush policies, granted mostly the war, but it was huge at times. The media mostly ignored them.

The right-wing protests are covered, even sometimes promoted by the media.

I too, have doubts about the tea-baggers, en mass being co-opted into progressive causes, but I do imagine that some memes (ie US OUT of NAFTA, living wages, etc.) might at the least cause cognitive dissonance in some.

Richard L. Adlof (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#46

@ZeroG: Lot’s wife did not express her doubt to the deity; she acted out of doubt and in defiance of other human’s words.

Yaakov told the deity that if it produced, it would earn his allegiance then beat the crap out the deity’s angel twenty years later . . .

Mark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#47

I would like to point out to Thom, Quark and others that Mussolini's idea of "corporatism" was not about putting business men in charge of the government--quite the opposite. Mussolini's father was a "syndicalist," meaning workers in charge by a representational government made-up of workers from different industries. This idea was the bill-of-goods that Mussolini originally sold the Italian people. But what Mussolini ended-up doing was his government taking charge of seperate industries and telling businessmen and workers how they were going to operate. This is very different from corporations taking charge; this is totalitarianism along communist lines. This is in fact close to the Merriam-Webster dictionary's definition of "corporatism."

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#48

I volunteered for the Ross Perot campaign (comprised mostly of disgruntled moderate Republicans, tho I have always been a progressive.)

Richard L. Adlof (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#49

@Quark: In “real terms”, leaders are accidents. There are folk with skill sets that allow them to manage. There are folk displaying/embodying that certain presence of being that folk choose to follow. BUT without the conditions that allow those ineffable traits to be recognized . . . We have a ghost without a reason.

Thom’s observations on movement politics are germane. Where there is passion, there is change. Like the fire triangle we must have oxygen, fuel and a spark.

Quark (not verified) 9 years 40 weeks ago
#50

Mark,

Is it possible that "corporatism" is a term that has evolved to have a meaning more suited to today's situation?

"Corporatism comes to America"

http://www.americanthinker.com/2009/05/corporatism_comes_to_america.html

America Needs To Move Seniors Out of Poverty and to Stop Choosing Between Food & Medicine

Thom plus logo For decades, progressives have been talking about eliminating the cap on the Social Security tax and raising Social Security benefits enough that retired and disabled people can actually survive.

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