Daily Topics - Tuesday June 29th, 2010

Hour One: Why are the Republicans so attached to race bating politics?

Two: Who is Barack Obama really? Thom talks to Newsweek's Jonathan Alter about his new book "The Promise: President Obama, Year One" http://books.simonandschuster.com/Promise/Jonathan-Alter

Hour Three: Should we start to worry about Russian Redheads, invisible ink, shortwave radios, wifi cafes and nuclear weapons? Russia Today's DC correspondent Alyona Minkovski will be here

Comments

gerald's picture
gerald 9 years 34 weeks ago
#1

On June 28, 2010 I posted Mary Shaw’s article, http://www.opednews.com/articles/Your-Humanitarian-Work-Cou-by-Mary-Shaw-100628-267.html. I also asked the question, “Is Thom Hartmann targeted for jail?” I said that he is targeted for jail.

Thom Hartmann is a humanitarian and so he is also considered a terrorist. No one should doubt that the goose-stepping neocons see Thom as a terrorist. Why you may ask? Humanitarians want to do what is best for the people and for the common good. Thom does a very good job of informing Numb Nut Americans. Informing human beings is contrary to the will of our federal government, the rich, our corporations, and the devil’s disciples who are overt and rampant in the United States of Hell.

These sources want to keep us begging and stupid. Knowledge is power and anyone who informs us is considered a terrorist because we have now some power. Information is contrary to the goals of the elite and the corporatists who want us to endlessly beg and remain stupid.

Thom needs to sit with Louise and put their home in order as he awaits the gestapo’s knock on the door.

Jeanie's picture
Jeanie 9 years 34 weeks ago
#2

Not that I want to claim him, but John Kyl is a senator from Arizona, not Texas. Remember, we have 2 crazies here.

Maxrot's picture
Maxrot 9 years 34 weeks ago
#3

Republicants are showing their true character. Its revolting.

N

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#4

That's the difference between Arizona and Texas. Arizona has 2 crazies only. :D

Jeanie's picture
Jeanie 9 years 34 weeks ago
#5

Actually, both of our senators are crazy, which is 100%. And the legislature is not much better.

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#6

Here in Austin, people ask me why we don't have a zoo. I explain 'cause we have the legislature.

Jeanie's picture
Jeanie 9 years 34 weeks ago
#7

You are a funny guy, Harry.

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#8

Luckily, I escaped!

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#9

Did ya'll ever see "12 Monkeys"?

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#10

In 12 Monkeys, pranksters released all the animals from the zoo. I plan to do the same with the legislature.

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#11

Dear Jeanie, from the nose up you look like that beautiful Maggie Rodriguez on CBS. Guess you have a heavy beard, huh?

Jeanie's picture
Jeanie 9 years 34 weeks ago
#12

I do earn good money from my parttime job as the Bearded Lady at the circus. So I accept it.

Jeanie's picture
Jeanie 9 years 34 weeks ago
#13

I love that there are some newspeople/bloggers who follow up on statements by Republicans like Jeff Sessions and Orrin Hatch. I only wish national news organizations would show this.

river61's picture
river61 9 years 34 weeks ago
#14

Steve Forbert has an incredible new song out The Oil Song a ballad for these trouble times:

http://steveforbert.bandcamp.com/album/the-oil-song-2010

Maxrot's picture
Maxrot 9 years 34 weeks ago
#15

@harry, 12 Monkey's is a great movie, but the pranksters releasing the animals from a zoo was a misdirection, the Government was concentrating on the wrong group as the cause of the plague, and when it came down to it, it was one determined fanatic that engineered and released the devastating plague. Which is nice that you bring up this movie, because I feel that the moral of the story is keep your eyes and mind open, sometimes its the quiet and insignificant that can bring about the greatest change.

N

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#16

re: 15: dear Maxrot: THAT's the moral of the story? Huh! I thought the moral was: "Never let a green mouse control your dialysis machine!"

Maxrot's picture
Maxrot 9 years 34 weeks ago
#17

Thom, a lot of countries got dragged into WWII, Great Britain was following a policy of appeasement up through 1938. France was even reluctant to do anything that would cause confrontation. More so because these countries had the fresh memory of WWI in mind and were scarred from it. Britain also had, more or less, a guilty conscience of the heavy handed Versailles Treaty. The League of Nations tried, and in some cases was successful in maintaining peace. Its major failure wasn't just the lack of America joining, but also Russia, and Germany was excluded.

I wouldn't say Wilson fought WWI either, he reluctantly entered the United States in 1917, and the majority of our troops didn't get there to participate until late spring of 1918. Our troops were the tipping point for an exhausted Germany, they knew they couldn't withstand the increasing numbers, and agreed to a peace based on Wilson's 14 points. However, America itself didn't do anything so spectacular that it won the war, it just showed up at the end to help deliver the final blow and enjoy the spoils (not that Germany hadn't blundered into inviting this with its return to unrestricted submarine warfare).

N

scottgee1 9 years 34 weeks ago
#18

Secretaries General of the U.N.

1 Trygve Lie (Norway)

2 Dag Hammarskjöld (Sweden)

3 U Thant (Burma)

4 Kurt Waldheim (Austria)

5 Javier Pérez de Cuéllar (Peru)

6 Boutros Boutros-Ghali (Egypt)

7 Kofi Annan (Ghana)

8 Ban Ki-moon (South Korea)

Gene Savory's picture
Gene Savory 9 years 34 weeks ago
#19

The Russians probably didn't "rear their heads" while Palin was watching.

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#20

"I CAN SMELL THE GULF OF MEXICO FROM MY HOUSE!" - harry ashburn

Maxrot's picture
Maxrot 9 years 34 weeks ago
#21

So is America diverse enough to evolve through this economic disaster.

N

Gene Savory's picture
Gene Savory 9 years 34 weeks ago
#22

The Irish potato famine was largely due to their preference for only one potato of 12 types. No diversity was the result. The railroad barons benefited from the food crisis.

Maxrot's picture
Maxrot 9 years 34 weeks ago
#23

OH GAWD Thom, please don't talk about M. Whitman as though she's already won. Not yet at least, I live in CA, under the guvenator, I can't stomach a captilation to another Republicant Governor right now.

N

Jeanie's picture
Jeanie 9 years 34 weeks ago
#24

I think it is frightening that a company like Monsanto can control much of the food supply or have a huge influence on the food supply, and do so for profit and with no regard for health and safety. Last week, Anthony Bourdain said on this show that he didn't think the government should be responsible for ensuring a safe food supply. Who then? And how come I have to spend a lot more on organic fruit and vegetables for my son because there are mostly only pesticide-laden choices that are available to me? For that matter, how come I have to pay $35 a month on a water filtration system because the water out of the faucet (which we also pay for), isn't necessarily that good to drink. Safe food and water should be rights of the people and not privileges for those who can afford them. If people have the right to guns, they should also have the right to clean and safe food and water.

I am done now.

Gene Savory's picture
Gene Savory 9 years 34 weeks ago
#25

Memetics lead to homogenization of cultures. Some values should die. Diversity isn't everything.

The thousands upon thousands stories of creation have been pared to the point where there are a handful remaining. When those are gone we may make some progress.

Gene Savory's picture
Gene Savory 9 years 34 weeks ago
#26

@Jeanie re water: the English Bill of Rights declared that water is a right of men. There is a long history of riparian rights that is now being shoved aside because corporations, like father, know best.

Read Greg Palast's articles on water privatization in South America.

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#27

re:26: yeah! and the Chinese are now doing the same thing in Africa! They even have to mimic our imperialism!

Jeanie's picture
Jeanie 9 years 34 weeks ago
#28

Gene, I heard (maybe here) that Florida was going to sell water rights to a private corporation right before some disaster (can't remember) and then it fell through because of the disaster. Private corporations (unless non-profit and operating in the public good) should have the right to control a resource like water.

Maxrot's picture
Maxrot 9 years 34 weeks ago
#29

There's no doubt in my mind that we have spies in, Britain, France, Italy, Germany, Turkey, China, Japan, Vietnam, Korea, Austria, Australia, South Africa, Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Canada, .......... heck we even spy on our own citizens, I wouldn't doubt we put spies anywhere and everywhere.

N

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#30

Maxrot, don't forget special forces in Somalia, Pakistan and Iran, as well as secret prisons in what was 128 countries. Obama promised to close them down, but, 'cause its black budget, no way to verify.

gerald's picture
gerald 9 years 34 weeks ago
#31
gerald's picture
gerald 9 years 34 weeks ago
#32

Breaking News!!!

I have just received information from deep operatives whom I worked with as a former Republican. There will be one case heard by the activist United States Supreme Court this summer. They will be hearing from the neocons on Thom Hartmann as an active terrorist. With five Mafioso’s on the court you can guess how they will rule on Thom Hartmann.

Diversity

Thom mentioned briefly on diversity in our foods.

Personally, not all food should be genetically modified.

My former high school varsity baseball coach was Greek. A few years back he wrote a book on his daughter who died. He said that Greeks can have a genetic medical problem whenever they only marry Greeks over long periods of time. Nationalities do marry within their groups, such as Greeks and Greeks, Germans and Germans, Irish and Irish, etc. As with foods nationalities need some diversity so that certain illnesses do not surface within specific nationalities.

There are parents who will not attend a wedding of their son or daughter unless they marry a spouse in a similar nationality.

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#33

There were a lot of incestual marriages in the european royal families of the 15th-19th centuries; which explains prince charle's teeth and ears

Maxrot's picture
Maxrot 9 years 34 weeks ago
#34

I would like to know, is there anything we can legitimately do to decrease the power of the SCrOTUS? If so what is it?

N

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#35

re: #34: ask a urologist.

Gene Savory's picture
Gene Savory 9 years 34 weeks ago
#36

Dr. Squint Procto can aid you.

harry ashburn 9 years 34 weeks ago
#37

:D

Bruce Leeroy's picture
Bruce Leeroy 9 years 34 weeks ago
#38

Well I'm an Independent and I live in AZ, and let's be fair about both of our Senators being 100% crazy.

In defense of John McCain, even though I voted for President Obama, McCain,during his bid for president in 2008,visited the Lorraine Motel at the site where MLK was assassinated, and he issued an impromptu apology to a predominantly African American crowd, in the rain, for the vote that he cast in AZ in the 90's against a holiday honoring MLK. Can you name any other AZ politician that has publicly apologized for voting against the MLK holiday?

His apolgy was so repentant and lament-filled until grown men in the audience were brought to immediate tears. Some in the audience could be heard shouting they forgive him on MLK's behalf and that God forgives him for his vote on that fateful day.

John McCain also adopted a child that could pass for an African-American, although she is not.

Sen. Kyl on the other hand, just voiced an all out assault against Jusice Marshall yesterday.Frankly, I have never seen an example by or of Sen. Kyl saying or doing anything that resembles anyone that has even half of a soul.

Therefore, as progressives, we are bound by our high moral ground to judge a book based upon its content, not upon its cover.

Which of these two books would you return to the library 1st?

How To Bring Back A Middle Class

Thom plus logo From the 1930s to the Reagan Revolution, America grew the largest and most robust middle class in history. Along with strong unions, the main driver of that was that people earning more than about $10 million in today's money confronted a top tax rate of 91% until the 60s, and 67% until Reagan came into office.

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From Cracking the Code:
"Thom Hartmann ought to be bronzed. His new book sets off from the same high plane as the last and offers explicit tools and how-to advice that will allow you to see, hear, and feel propaganda when it's directed at you and use the same techniques to refute it. His book would make a deaf-mute a better communicator. I want him on my reading table every day, and if you try one of his books, so will you."
Peter Coyote, actor and author of Sleeping Where I Fall
From The Thom Hartmann Reader:
"Thom Hartmann is a creative thinker and committed small-d democrat. He has dealt with a wide range of topics throughout his life, and this book provides an excellent cross section. The Thom Hartmann Reader will make people both angry and motivated to act."
Dean Baker, economist and author of Plunder and Blunder, False Profits, and Taking Economics Seriously
From Cracking the Code:
"No one communicates more thoughtfully or effectively on the radio airwaves than Thom Hartmann. He gets inside the arguments and helps people to think them through—to understand how to respond when they’re talking about public issues with coworkers, neighbors, and friends. This book explores some of the key perspectives behind his approach, teaching us not just how to find the facts, but to talk about what they mean in a way that people will hear."
to understand how to respond when they’re talking about public issues with coworkers, neighbors, and friends. This book explores some of the key perspectives behind his approach, teaching us not just how to find the facts, but to talk about what they mean in a way that people will hear."