Is there room in Guantanamo for Faux News?

According to a report from Yahoo!News, the second largest shareholder, the parent company of Fox News, Saudi Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal in News Corp, has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to projects by Feisal Abdul Rauf's, who is planning to build a Muslim community center and mosque near Ground Zero in Manhattan. According to the report the Saudi Prince has directly funded Imam's projects to the tune of more than $300,000." The Saudi Prince's personal charity, the Kingdom Foundation, donated $305,000 to Muslim Leaders of Tomorrow, a project sponsored by two of Rauf's initiatives, the American Society for Muslim Advancement and the Cordoba Initiative, which is building the Manhattan mosque. It seems ironic That Faux News' second-largest shareholder, after Rupert Murdoch, has financial links to the "Ground Zero mosque" while the Faux News Performers talking heads attempt to link the mosque to radical Islamism. Does this mean by Faux News standards, Faux News is a terrorist organization? Is there room in Guantanamo for the Faux News Performer hosts and that companies executives?

Comments

Minny's picture
Minny 13 years 43 weeks ago
#1

There might be enough room for their bodies, but I doubt there is even close to enough room for their egos. Perhaps we should keep pushing this, though. Maybe then they will finally close Gitmo.

cbates's picture
cbates 13 years 43 weeks ago
#2

On the one hand, at first glance it looks like the kind of scandal that could cause shock waves to reach powerful and sinister men in their boardrooms, their true game exposed to the masses. But of course only a tiny percentage of citizens are ever going to hear about it. Why? The usual reason. Journalists in every kind of mass media figured out a long time ago, what kinds of stories are career suicide.

The thing I admire most about Thom is that he hasn't given up. I almost wish I could say that about me. I left the USA to live in a real democrasy and let me tell you it ain't at all like the US's phony imitation. The real thing is grand.

netactivist99 13 years 43 weeks ago
#3

The "anti-bin Laden mosque" is my nominee for how we should refer to the controversial community center. Or maybe the "anti-bin Laden community center." But the latter doesn't have quite the ring to it.

stardustborn's picture
stardustborn 13 years 43 weeks ago
#4

Rather than Guantanamo, I'd like to send Faux News to one of those Secret prisons no one knows about. And then only let them go when every one else who's being illegally held in Guantanamo and elsewhere is freed. Do you think that would help them understand why all prisoners should be allowed certain rights? Probably not!

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