3 millions jobs in India – not the US!!

You need to know this about President Obama’s trip to Southeast Asia. He says it's an effort to open up markets to India – the world’s largest democracy – and for the Wal-Mart executives with him, that's true. They want to sell more stuff made in China in India in their retail stores, and are frustrated that Indian law only allows one company to own two retail stores. They're using Obama's prestige to get that law blown up. Additionally, Obama is there selling the only things we still make in the US - military hardware and airplanes. He says that will create as many as 54,000 jobs in the US, because, he says, the Indian consumer market is so large. But we no longer make consumer goods in the US! Meanwhile, the President is also bringing with him more than 200 business leaders – including leaders from Wal Mart. As Wal Mart CEO Michael Duke points – more than 3 million jobs can be created in India if he can get their laws changed. That’s 3 millions jobs in India – not the US. Likewise, Honeywell already operates a facility in India employing 11,000 low wage engineers and scientists. Honeywell CEO David Cote says his company has moved American engineering jobs to India because India has "superior engineering". What they really have is cheap labor. Obama's simply continuing the insane free trade policies of Reagan, both Bushes, and Clinton. And, as long as they continue – your jobs will continue to vanish overseas.

Comments

stonesphear's picture
stonesphear 12 years 12 weeks ago
#1

Thom challenges us here with a complex knot. What does it come down to ? Goods manufactured in China, originating out of the US, for consumption in India. Two franchises or businesses being the limit set by the culture of India. Say what ? Wall Mart and Target ? Weird, weird, weird. You have to hand it to Thom for giving one something to think about. Theory ? Facts? Road work involves inquiring minds.

emberAZ's picture
emberAZ 12 years 12 weeks ago
#2

I am appalled by the trade policies of this country. That I have a job at all is a minor miracle. My children are having problems -- 38 to 42. This country is disintegrating and the people on the right seem to think that's just fine. Between the militarism, the corporatism and the insane tax policies I don't see what chance there is. Happily I'm getting your new book. I wish you well.

downn2 12 years 12 weeks ago
#3

Most don't know the close door button in elevators purposely don't do anything, as they are there just to give the people in the elevation the feeling of being in control. Like the button in the elevator, the Democratic party is there to serve the same purpose.

HenryB's picture
HenryB 12 years 12 weeks ago
#4

Jobs in the United States? Only for militay hardware as long as we can keep the tension between India and Pakistan at high levels. Like having one of our agents scout out the Mumbai attacks. (See 11/8 issue of New York Times) As for Walmart creating 3 million new jobs in India, they'll replace the 6 to 10 million jobs that will be lost by small family owned retailers as Walmart plows them into the ground. Just like they did over here. Gandhi would turn over in his grave.

Airborne855's picture
Airborne855 12 years 12 weeks ago
#5

No doubt one day soon the United States will have only one industry -- guns for hire. We'll be the mercenary nation writ large. With private armies and robots we'll make a killing both figuratively and literally.

southmpls 12 years 12 weeks ago
#6

David Cote is on the Deficit Reduction Commission. When Cote's corp. decided to send its jobs to India, did profits increase? Did Shareholders do better? Higher dividends? When Maytag sent its jobs to Mexico, did washers and dryers become cheaper than they were when they were built in Iowa? Something is awry and the answers are not forthcoming. The offshoring of jobs isn't about seriously intelligent workers. It's about cost cutting. Microsoft does this. Meanwhile, corporate profits are skyrocketing, corporate cash troves are at unprecedented levels, and U.S. unemployment is at 1930s levels. Cote isn't hiring Americans. When will it become fashionable to be a company that does right and does well? It's possible, you know. This theme is off the radar screen, dating back to the 80s. If we can't un-do offshoring of jobs, then we MUST tax the offshoring of jobs to a fare-thee-well. We can't just say "gee that's too bad that we don't have any middle class in America." We have to BE for something. If not for workers, then for whom? I'm really looking for the national conversations on this.

Stroeve, Minneapolis

southmpls 12 years 12 weeks ago
#7

I almost forgot to mention...a moral aspect is mandatory to the national discussion. We cannot simply talk about right versus left or right versus wrong. There are moral equations at every step as we attempt to form a more perfect union in America. To a large degree, the moral argument has been absent since the 80s. JAS, Minneapolis

Robert Jacobs's picture
Robert Jacobs 12 years 12 weeks ago
#8

Jas of Minneapolis

The moral argument has been missing sense the 20's or for that matter sense the beginning of time! It all depends on whether you are virtuous or not! You see Thom believes that virtue is something you vote for... then government does the rest.

Robert

Longville MN

jgoldman's picture
jgoldman 12 years 12 weeks ago
#9

An unintended consequence of Pres. Obama's trip to India is that it clearly illustrates the point you make Thom that except for products that kill people... WE DON'T MAKE ANYTHING IN THE US ANYMORE TO EXPORT! This is an easy bumper sticker sized concept to pitch Americans that touches the very core of our society's biggest economic problem.

I would love to hear Obama lead with 100% commitment and effort to use the levers of government to incentivize and enable the rebirth of manufacturing in America. This would require an appropriate level of protectionist trade policy that levels the playing field considering areas such as environmental impact and human rights. That said, Obama doesn't have the stones to fight the multinationals and the bought and paid for congress. Obama and the dems would need to lead by dismantling the corporate welfare maze benefiting the multinationals so as to redirect subsidies and tax incentives to small business. But... again we have the small sized stones problem. Additionally, Pres. Obama should encourage the proliferation of union membership but he has no appreciation for the contribution of unions who present a counterweight to corporate management's pure profit ethos and protects worker rights.

Bottom line: ain't gonna happen under the leadership of Barrack "Ronnie Reagan" Obama. He's a weak leader, a corporatist, a closet conservative, and a phony.

But given the choices our 2-party system brings us, he's the best we got....

UNLESS.... we click our heels together 3 times and believe that we can beat the odds and say... Russ Feingold, Russ Feingold, Russ Feingold for president.

ArtD's picture
ArtD 12 years 12 weeks ago
#10

No, I don't think this trip of Obama will make any jobs here in the US. Unless Obama comes out swinging and does something different than he has been doing. Make no mistake Obama has done a lot in just two years but he lost most of his base because he forgot us and the Unions. Reagan changed after his first two years and his second term so Maybe Obama will figure that out and change.

sisterearth's picture
sisterearth 12 years 12 weeks ago
#11

Why is Obama letting these people run all over him? He will not win the reelection, I don't think he knows what he's doing!! uuugggh! Walmart execs!!!

WindHarps's picture
WindHarps 12 years 12 weeks ago
#12

It's the same corporate sellout "process" which gave us a Mandate, without a Public Option. Remember that (exposed) "heated rhetoric" over NAFTA with Hillary Clinton? It's the same "ugly mess." Remember him ridiculing the "left" -- after betraying all promises? It's the same level of "regret" -- without accountability. Remember all the "compromise," while seeking bipartisanship (as long as it was Blue Dog and/or further to the Right)? Refusing to implement a foreclosure moratorium in the face of national Enronesque fraud? Praising Jamie Dimon and Fred Smith? The 180 on FISA and Retroactive Immunity? "Looking forward, not backward"? The 180 on a second set of torture photos? What has been the same (and "insane") will remain. And now that there is a new House, another phase has only just begun.

Grandma Jackie's picture
Grandma Jackie 12 years 12 weeks ago
#13

No, the jobs sound like they are for India. In fact tonight on the news Harley Davidson said they are going to build a factory in India. Also heard that Kohler Co. has been trying to build a pottery in India because the climate is dryer than Kohler WI. Oh, it will be the end to the factory in Kohler if that happens. They just laid off 350 and they are working on a contract vote. No, I do not believe that India will bring jobs to the US.

MrXtramean's picture
MrXtramean 12 years 12 weeks ago
#14

As long as politicians keep kissing a$$ with corporations, America loses. I'm going to sound like a Socialist here, but it is in the best interest of the country, the securing and growth of the general welfare, that Congress protect our jobs and promote the pursuit of happiness. Meaning, Congress needs to pass laws that tell corporations they have limits. Limits on pay, limits on out-sourcing jobs, etc. Busniess should be, first and foremost, to lift the nation, not make the most profit for pocket.

No one builds a house and starts with the roof. It's the foundation that supports the whole house. And that base is "the people". If the base is well paid, well educated and trained, then the everything above the base will only be better and stronger. Simple logic: Pay people less, they will spend less and won't buy products and demand decreases. Pay people more and they spend more and that will create demand. As long as CEO's (who's pay increased over 400% during Bush years+) and corporate profits (increased over 140% during Bush years+) and continue to pay workers less, in the end, they will all go out of business or think they must move over seas to operate their business just maintain their profits. But again, if we don't have money/wages in the states, it really doesn't where you out source to, we won't have the money to buy the products.

If Obama can get "them" to buy our mfg goods, great. It will help. But going over there to help corporations further out-sourcing is a stab in the back to the American people who need those jobs. I really like President Obama, the campaigner Obama, but unless he stands firm on who voted him in and why, he's just wasting our time.

patoni123's picture
patoni123 12 years 11 weeks ago
#16

Thom:
I know the phrase "A rising tide lifts all boats" may or may not apply to this policy of the so-called free trade agreements w/other countries. If it is "fair trade" then we will kick any countries ass! The good thing is we need more allies, i.e., India, Indonesia, etc, to counter China and Obama really showed he had cahonas when he blasted the Chinese on their unfair trade policy- he really surprised me! The real problem is the environment. Without a planet to make goods and sell them nothing else matters. I believe this planet is worn out and there is no time left to squabble about anything else. We need to continue to make this our no. #1 priority and not stop until we get the planet headed back in the right direction (if there is time). Of all people you know that! Sadly though It may be too late.

Sincerely:
Robert Fields
Clayton, Ga

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